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I want to convert to the Carbon Belt Drive. I currently have a Salsa Juan Solo that has carbon seat stays that are connected to the dropouts via a bolt. I want to remove this bolt so I can install the belt. Is there any reason why I shouldn't do this?

BTW, has anyone tried a belt drive?

http://www.carbondrivesystems.com/overview.php
 

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aka baycat
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I know on the Spot bikes there is a rocket tensioner, that a possible problem with throwing a belt drive. Do not have the appropriate dropouts?

And the cogs and belt seem to take up a lot more 'room'. Read some frame builders blog posts who had to get a bit creative fitting it all in there.
 

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Loved my old Solo- wish I hadn't sold it.
I tried once to get one of those rear bolts off. Not sure how they are installed, painted on or Loc Tite. Either way I'm pretty sure you'd have to trash the bolt to remove it so find a replacement before hand.
 

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It just might work!

I am not familiar with your frame, but looking at the picture, it might work. The only problem I can see is it might be hard to stretch the seat and chain stays apart enough to get the belt in there. I would try it out first before buying anything! You have an EBB, so tensioning should be no problem. Also, as Baycat said, chainring (beltring?) clearance my be an issue.

Mark
 

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Measure the chainstay length first. There's still a limited range of cogs, and with belts coming in 3 or 5 tooth increments, you want to be sure that the belt drive will not only fit, but also allow you to fit the right ratios.

By my calcs you can fit a 55/32 with 122 belt, 50/28 with 118 belt, 60/32 with 125 belt. This is based on the published chainstay length of 429mm and assuming there is 10mm of movement either way, but minus a small margin at the front.

Don't rely on this, measure it yourself, and check the handy charts that Gates or Nicolai provide.
 

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Schipperkes are cool.
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Here is the problem with the idea:
There is No way to minutely adjust the rear axle to achieve the perfect belt line to keep the belt On both cogs.

I've had that discussion with Frank, Taylor & Gavin and all agreed at different times that an EBB is not enough.
 

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banks said:
Here is the problem with the idea:
There is No way to minutely adjust the rear axle to achieve the perfect belt line to keep the belt On both cogs.

I've had that discussion with Frank, Taylor & Gavin and all agreed at different times that an EBB is not enough.
I do not understand this post at all. Having the axle not move would seem like a good thing to me! The great thing about an EBB is that you can slide it side to side to get the perfect beltline for this frame. So how do they adjust the beltline on the Spot bikes? I suppose they use the two tensioners on the dropouts? If that is the case, then you are not really adjusting the beltline, instead you are adjusting the cog to be parallel to the chainring. Maybe that is what you are talking about?

In any case, I think sliding the EBB left or right would work just fine.

Mark
 

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bikeny said:
In any case, I think sliding the EBB left or right would work just fine.
+1. Why wouldn't this work if you slide it left or right to align the beltline? Isn't that what ebb's are for on top of chain tension adjustment?

I want a belt drive, but I DON'T want a Spot frame for my own reasons.
 

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+2

I thought an EBB would be the perfect tool for belt drive because of the lateral adjustment possibilities.

Is there some question as to an EBB's ability to hold the tension?
 

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Velobike said:
+2

I thought an EBB would be the perfect tool for belt drive because of the lateral adjustment possibilities.

Is there some question as to an EBB's ability to hold the tension?
It's not about the EBB being unable to hold tension, more about the subtle adjustments to wheel alignment needed to keep the drive belt running centrally on the two pullies without it trying to run against one or other of the flanges.
With track ends and chaintugs (or sliding, vertical drops) it's no problem to do as the wheel can be angled very slightly, but with fixed vertical drops and an EBB you can't - and you have no way of knowing whether the frame is aligned sufficiently accurately for this to be unneccesary until you try it of course.
All this is mentioned as being part of the setting-up procedure in the original post.
 

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ah, so if you have a poorly constructed or hard-used frame the axle of the BB may not be parallel to that of the rear axle.

Ok, then that can be checked by measuring it. Be a bummer to discover your expensive frame is squint :)

Moral of the story, don't order your belt drive bits until you're done a bit of careful measuring.
 

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I suppose that if you could tension the belt by means of an EBB, then you could always take a file to the dropouts and take a gnat's cock off one side or the other until the belt ran how you wanted it to. If it was running too far out on the rear wheel pulley and too far in at the crank, then take a tiny bit off the non-drive side dropout for example.
Maybe a bit "trial and error-ish" for some peoples liking, but I can't see why it wouldn't do the job. After all, you'd only need to do it the once.
 

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Andy R said:
I suppose that if you could tension the belt by means of an EBB, then you could always take a file to the dropouts and take a gnat's cock off one side or the other until the belt ran how you wanted it to. If it was running too far out on the rear wheel pulley and too far in at the crank, then take a tiny bit off the non-drive side dropout for example.
Maybe a bit "trial and error-ish" for some peoples liking, but I can't see why it wouldn't do the job. After all, you'd only need to do it the once.
I like your thinking.:thumbsup:

If you didn't want to butcher your frame, you could do this to the rear axle which has less consequences if you get it wrong, and the parts are replaceable.
 

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I was just about to edit my post to suggest the same thing, but now I don't need to...;)

Yes, it would be even easier to file a bit of a flat on the wheel spindle - you'd just have to make sure that it was located in the right position if the wheel had been removed/refitted.
 

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Hmmm if you're using a cassette hub playing around with the chainline should solve any issues with the belt not running completely straight. Looking at it i think that the lateral flex of the belt should provide enough flex to compensate a small misaligment.

But why arent there ridges on both sides of the cog/ring? That should solve the minimal aligment issues. Or did i miss some basic fact about the system?
 
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