Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a new pair of Crank Bros Candy C pedals and a pair of Shimano MT70 shoes. I am pretty sure I installed everything correctly and I am having a heck of a time trying to clip into the pedals. I can clip in holding the shoe in my hand, but in a half hour of trying I was only able to click in handful of times (this is just one shoe at a time). I did use the shims, and there doesn't seem to be any more significant trend interference. I have tried following the instructions for all the possible ways to click in.

I thought these were supposed to be easy to get into. Any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
I use the Candy's on my commuter as well as several others in the eggbeater series on my fs. They should be pretty easy to clip in. How is the angle of the cleats on the bottom of the shoe? Sometimes, you need to adjust those to be able to clip in. Also, sometimes you have to roll the inner part of the pedal using your shoe to get to the part of the spring where the cleat can clip in.

I hope that helps, but I am betting some others will have better ideas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
I have the candy bros. Smarty (similar to yours but less expensive and, evidently more cheaply made) and am still new to clipless. My best advice, practice, practice, practice(Preferably on grass or in a trainer). I had a ride a few weeks ago where I couldn't clip in for almost the whole 5 mile loop(had one side sometimes, but both only once). I am new to clipless too and hadn't ridden in a few weeks so going on the trail was probably a bad idea but... When I got home, I put my bike on my trainer and practiced for about an hour of clipping in and out. When on the trainer(or with your brakes on while standing), I really focused on trying to feel the front of the clip push forward and then pushed my foot down. I hear it gets to be second-nature but, again, I'm still new! The last two rides I have had very few problems. I did switch back to flats to try for a day and went right back to clipless. The added power from upward motion was too good! Good luck and keep practicing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
mwmtb said:
I have the candy bros. Smarty (similar to yours but less expensive and, evidently more cheaply made) and am still new to clipless. My best advice, practice, practice, practice(Preferably on grass or in a trainer). I had a ride a few weeks ago where I couldn't clip in for almost the whole 5 mile loop(had one side sometimes, but both only once). I am new to clipless too and hadn't ridden in a few weeks so going on the trail was probably a bad idea but... When I got home, I put my bike on my trainer and practiced for about an hour of clipping in and out. When on the trainer(or with your brakes on while standing), I really focused on trying to feel the front of the clip push forward and then pushed my foot down. I hear it gets to be second-nature but, again, I'm still new! The last two rides I have had very few problems. I did switch back to flats to try for a day and went right back to clipless. The added power from upward motion was too good! Good luck and keep practicing!
Not just that, but maintaining a constant power while out of the saddle is my number one reason for having my clipless. Practicing is important to get a feel for it. I remember it took me 15 minutes to just get one of my shoes in on a spin bike. After that I was flying!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
You might need to trim some of the tread from the bottom of your shoes the part that sits over the platfom of the pedal. I had to do it to my Sidi's. I used and Xacto knife and it worked well. These are the easiest pedals to clip in and out of that I have used. I rode Time pedals for years then switched to the Candy SL's as of two years ago and love them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,381 Posts
take your shoes (off your feet) and try to snap it in ... look where its hanging up and fix it :)... xacto knife like the last guy mentioned is likley the solution...

enjoy the new found power and stability with your new pedals :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
trimming the tread a little helped me,still isnt 2nd nature yet but getting better every ride.

before i got mine i kept hearing the horror stories of getting out,im glad i don't have that problem...it's getting in that was rough for a bit. i'm shure i'll have my (i could'nt clip out and bit it) story . i'll keep y'all posted on that one .

the power is amazing ,and with me just getting back into it i need all the help i can get:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,995 Posts
It took me a few hours to learn how to clip in and out effortlessly - at first it seemed impossible (literally), but once I learned the body mechanics, it became pretty much second nature.

I learned on pavement (dumb move). I suggest leaning against a wall while you learn.

Definitely check to make sure your tread is not in the way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,381 Posts
back in the day we rode with toe clips... so the lingo was clipless as you rode without the clips around your foot... ironic as you "clip in" with clipless haha

there are some good threads on the subject if you search...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
This is a clipped pedal:



The clips that you are referring to on the bottom of the shoes are called cleats. Make sure that when you do get a clipless setup, that you make sure to get quality shoes because those will have to last you a longer time then the pedals, and it makes a great difference in feel/comfort.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for all the advise. I practiced again and I am starting to get the hang of it. I think a bit more practice and I will try to take the bike out for a ride. I guess I wasn't expecting the clicking in would take practice. I t was the clicking out that I was worried about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
When I first switched over to the clipless pedals - Crank Bros EggBeaters, I tried learning while stationary, leaning against a wall, in the garage. Bad move - Had a bruised knee for weeks.

After looking online here at mtbr.com, I found a simple piece of advice: DON'T THINK ABOUT CLIPPING IN, JUST DO IT

It was amazing... as soon as I no longer concetrated on clipping in, and instead just started pedalling, it became so much easier to get locked in. Sure, I still had to line up the cleat with the clip, but the simple motion of pedalling will clip you in 95% of the time.

Hope this helps...

Peter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
Part of what makes the Candies the Candies is that the eggbeater-like bit in the middle spins around inside the rails. If it is spun so that you are in a less-than-ideal position over the eggbeater, you won't be able to get in. The thinking around that free spin is that the eggbeater ought to respond to you standing on it by spinning around to the correct position. The problem is, sometimes brand-new Candies are a little stiff, and don't like to spin. Plus, the spring is at its strongest when brand new.

The solution is, as everyone else has said, to practice. Not only to coordinate your feet, but to break in the pedals. If you reach down and find that it's NOTICEABLY difficult to spin the innards, you can apply some light lube like tri-flo, and the spin it around by hand to work it in. I had the exact same problem as you did the first time out, and I've been using clipless for years. The above solved my problem. When my girlfriend went to Crank Bros, it solved her problems, too.

Enjoy your pedals!
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top