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I see alot of Cannondale Lefty forks for sale. I thought these were the forks to have. I was under the impression they are really good. I am conciderring purchasing the project 321 package. What am I not aware of about the Cannondale Lefty that everyone else is? I weigh 300 pounds so I was thinking of a 40/36 spoke disc wheel set with the Lefty speed shock and all the manucia that makes it turn key ready. Please fill me in as I am all ears!
 

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Is it time to ride yet?
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IMO of course, the Lefty is the fork to have so to speak. But remember that not all lefty shocks are the same over the years, which it's why you may see many for sale as people upgrade to a newer generation and sell their old one. Some are built for short travel xc bikes while others have much more travel for all mountain bikes. As peoples needs change then possibly so does the lefty they need on their bike.

The general needle bearings have remained virtually the same until the 2013 models but the internal dampening circuits have evolved dramatically over the years. Some are air sprung (easily adjusted for your body weight and is a lighter weight shock) while others have internal springs inside which must be changed out to adjust to different rider weights. (which might not be possible at your current weight)

Some models have very good small bump compliance while others did not based on internal valve dampening. Some models had externally adjustable compression and rebound controls while others must be opened up to make dampening adjustments.

Some have lever actuated lock out valves (DLR), some push button (PBR), remote lever lock outs (XLR) and there was even an electric actuated lock out system years ago (ELO). Older lock out circuits were completely locked and can be damaged if left locked out on extremely rough terrain where newer lock out valving is very firm but will "blow off" if a certain pressure threshold is reached to protect shock internals.

Besides valving changes there have been changes to the body design including forged one piece steering stems and lower legs along with carbon body tubes to reduces overall weight of the lefty.

There are many more differences between leftys sold over the years not listed that may cause a lefty owner to sell their current one for a model that will meet their current needs, so don't be afraid to see many up for sale as it is just evolution of an amazing product.

Just do your research on leftys before buying one for your project as the cheapest one you find may not meet your specific needs.

Good Luck! :thumbsup:
 

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Hybrid Leftys aren't real
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At 300 lbs, you'll want top consider a few things.

Avoid carbon Leftys, hands down. The alloy forks have better overall chassis stiffness.

I'd also consider an older fork, perhaps a Max 140 from the 2005 era. The newer OPI lowers have lost stiffness relative to their older cousins. Still stiff forks, but weight loss that the market compels, does lead to stiffness reduction.

If you were 220, I'd still counsel for an older fork for increased stiffness, but a 300? You'll really appreciate it.

They are new enough however, that you can drop modern guts into them, which is nice also, in your weight range, as finding the brown spring you'd need, will be tough, and the newer ones are air sprung, much more tunable for your needs.

Woodman makes 36 hole Lefty hubs, not sure if anyone else does. Frankly? I have one in the case at the shop that I'm no longer using. So if you end up with a fork, drop me a line, I'll get it to you for a reasonable price.

They are great forks. You may see an uptick in for sale ones due to the new design forks coming into stock, many of us geeks just want the latest and greatest.... ;)
 

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Hybrid Leftys aren't real
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Are You really don't recommended to buy carbon lefty? I also wish to buy alloy PBR 2013, but my friend sell almost new carbon XLR 2012 for 800$, and I strongly think about it :madman: What would you do in my place?:)
If you weigh less than 200lbs, and don't mind a tiny bit more flex, go for the carbon.

Heavier? I'd go alloy.

Carbon isn't bad, I'm not saying don't buy it. I work on hundreds and hundreds of forks a year. I see the carbons come in, and every time it's a heavier rider, I'll see decent wearing of the ano on the inner leg in the front as the fork flexes enough to created heavier contact with the bushing inside the upper leg. They work fine, don't break, but that flex isn't present in the alloys at any rider weight.
 

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Ok,thanks, I'm about 190 pounds, decided, will wait new alloy lefty :) What's about lockout type, PBR/XLR, what's more reliably?
 

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Of course that's true of any product.

Out of interest I did this:

Googled "Cannondale Lefy problems" = 96000 hits.

Rockshox Reba problems = 57800 hits.

Rockshox SID problems = 46800 hits.

Manitou Minute problems = 453000 hits. :D

Just saying - I have had my Lefty fail twice, Cannondale techs down here (Australia) seem incompetent as it's never been rebuilt twice. And a work colleague has the same fork (Speed 110) and his has blown up twice too.

I think it's fair for a prospective buyer to hear all points of view. And my point of view is that my Lefty has been not only the most unreliable fork I have ever owned, going back to the early 90's, but the most unreliable bit of MTB gear I've ever used.

Which is a real shame as I love the way it feels when it's working and the Lefty tracking and stiffness that folks rave about is 100% true.
 

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Sorry mate, just done a search for "Cannondale Lefty Problems".

Most of those hits are simply talking about Lefty's.

The top hit is a someone having some issues with an ex-demo bike from back in 2010.

I'm sure that everyone will agree that Leftys (like any other fork) have had their fair share of problems. However, leftys have massively evolved and improved since then.
 

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Of course that's true of any product.

Out of interest I did this:

Googled "Cannondale Lefy problems" = 96000 hits.

Rockshox Reba problems = 57800 hits.

Rockshox SID problems = 46800 hits.

Manitou Minute problems = 453000 hits. :D

Just saying - I have had my Lefty fail twice, Cannondale techs down here (Australia) seem incompetent as it's never been rebuilt twice. And a work colleague has the same fork (Speed 110) and his has blown up twice too.

I think it's fair for a prospective buyer to hear all points of view. And my point of view is that my Lefty has been not only the most unreliable fork I have ever owned, going back to the early 90's, but the most unreliable bit of MTB gear I've ever used.

Which is a real shame as I love the way it feels when it's working and the Lefty tracking and stiffness that folks rave about is 100% true.
If it has been so unreliable all these years then why do you bother with it? If I had a piece of bike equipment that continually gave me grief I wouldn't hesitate to look for an alternative, especially when it comes to MTBing, the last thing I'd want when heading for the hills is a fork that I don't trust..

Regarding your google search, I'd imagine the majority of the 'Lefty problems' would simply turn out to be people's misunderstanding of them and how to look after them. Like the bearing reset procedure, in the earlier models it was an issue as the damper had to be removed to perform the reset, whereas modern Lefty's are so much easier to look after and maintain due to the split rings above the damper.

I've been riding MTB's for the best part of 25 years. In that time I've tried, tested & serviced forks from all the major manufacturer's - Manitou, Marzochhi, Fox, Rockshox. Some have been ultra reliable while others not so much. Rockshox have always been one of my favourites but I've serviced brand new RS fork's, right out of the box, that have had no oil in the damper or oil bath so its not just Lefty's that fall into the trap of unreliability.

I've been riding a Lefty of one kind or another for about 5 years now and I'm happy to report that they have been the most reliable forks I have used yet. I own an original 2001 Lefty that is still going strong after 11 years of use. Its old, ugly and very heavy but it has been well cared for & regularly maintained and IMO, in terms of suspension performance, it still out-performs any 100mm fork in its class hands down.

I suspect the problem with your fork is with the mechanic that maintains it... not the actual fork itself..
 

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bright path native
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All forks have issues, except maybe a rigid, but the 2008 Carbon Lefty has been the most reliable front end I have had while not running a rigid. Except until lately when the bottom half of the fork acquired a massive amount of side to side play. Sent it off to get worked on and am hoping it is salvagable!?

Sorry Mendon Cycle Smith, wish I found you for the repair. You seem to know your stuff when it comes to the Lefty!
 

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Hybrid Leftys aren't real
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All forks have issues, except maybe a rigid, but the 2008 Carbon Lefty has been the most reliable front end I have had while not running a rigid. Except until lately when the bottom half of the fork acquired a massive amount of side to side play. Sent it off to get worked on and am hoping it is salvagable!?

Sorry Mendon Cycle Smith, wish I found you for the repair. You seem to know your stuff when it comes to the Lefty!
They will fail without routine service, just like any other high performance product.

Likely just some bearing cages gave up the ghost. Should be an easy fix.

As long as someone competent is doing the job, no worries, glad you're happy with it!
 

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From what I understand, newer Leftys, 2008 to current are completely rebuildable even with some of the newer technology as long as there is no structural damage to the two main tubes. Is that pretty accurate?
 

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True, all Leftys as far back as 2005 can be rebuilt and upgraded to the new style dampers. The only odd balls are the Fox Terraloggic/Inertia Valve versions.
 

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bright path native
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Right on, I'm hoping a little TLC will get mine back on the trail, plus it's cheaper than a ponying up for a new one. Even though the new ones look killer!
 

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I have one of the Terralogic Lefty's, they were produced for just one year back in 2006

I downloaded a Lefty fork guide that says the Terralogic damper can be 'upgraded' or swapped out for the Fox RLC damper

Therefore, I can only assume that if Fox RLC's dampers can be upgraded to PBR / XLR, that the same thing can be done to the Terralogic fork with some internal changes & possibly a new OPI lower leg..?

I am only guessing though.
 

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Sorry about the Terraloggic. It used a special inner leg that is not compatible with PBR and XLR. The leg can be replaced with a newer OPI and then upgraded to PBR or XLR. Being that it uses a carbon outer, the dollars should add up versus buying a complete alloy Lefty.
 
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