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Hi,

Has anyone had any significant ride time on the current Jekyll? Just curious how it is in comparison to the Nomads. I'm an SC fan and currently ride an 03 Heckler and an 06 Blur XC. I ride the Heckler much more than the Blur.

Obvisouly no one has ride time on the new 27.5 versions. But was wondering what people thought about the current versions.

Tried to do a search but couldn't find much.

thanks

jr
 

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I have a 2012 Jekyll and it definitely rides like no other. Converts from an absolute DH shredder to an xc bike with the flow/climb setting on the Dyad RT2. Definitely ahead of it's time, also it's crazy light. My build is nothing special and I'm at nearly 27lbs, could easy get down to 26lbs.

As for the Nomad I can't say I have ridden one all that much I test rode one and it was a nice descender but climbed like a slug. Same with my old LTc, slugged up the climbs. Not too say the Santacruz's are bad bikes, just a bit heavy and sluggish, but they make up for it descending.

I'd go for the Jekyll, especially if you value climbing and weight. Don't be scared of the pull shock either that's the best part! :)
 

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I have both the Jekyll Carbon and it's an awesome bike. I have a Claymore as well and it's definitely a fun bike for jumps, although four feet is probably my max.

I took the Jekyll down to the luge and it felt like WAY TOO MUCH BIKE.

Mountain Biking "The Luge" - YouTube

(Note this is not me.)

Even in elevate mode 90mm the descents felt quite controllable.

The Jekyll's main problem is the 1.5 steerer cannondale uses. If you use a 1.5 fork then your choice of stems are limited. There are 0 degree stems you can buy for the Jekyll but they can be a little pricier than a standard stem.

Some people have complained about the Jekyll's geometry because the stock stem is set at a high angle and supposedly this angle effects things for descents. Personally I haven't noticed the effect on descents but where I do feel the stem is too high would be climbing, granted I don't have Talas on my Jekyll either, but for me when the climbs get steep the bike wanders.

In terms of efficiency the Jekyll climbs very well for a bike with so much travel. When comparing apples to apples I also have a Giant Faith 0 as well and feel that the Claymore is a much better climber even though I'm only running a Float fork. The light weight coupled to the bikes stiff rear end in elevate mode where travel drops to 110mm really improves the bike's climbing capabilities. There are climbs I can complete with the Jekyll in the big ring but I have to drop to the what' the small ring on my Faith using the Hammerschmidt.

It's an interesting question whether or not the Jekyll is a better bike than the Nomad. I like the Nomad because you can swap out the shock and put on a Vivid or CCDB Air.

On the other hand the Jekyll's rear end and shock mounting area looks so much beefier than the Nomad's. The rear end on the Jekyll is solid.

I think another reason to get the Jekyll is that it's just unloved it's so easy to find a Jekyll for 40-50% off. Of course that may happen to the nomad because of the new wheel size.

It's so easy to find a great deal on a Jekyll now especially a Carbon 1. Santa Cruz has always been a cool bike.

You should get what makes you happy but that the end of the day I think the Jekyll will be a better choice because it's a competent bike and it's going to cheaper especially for a higher end carbon 26 wheel model.
 

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I've ridden a Jekyll once, and spent a lot of time on a Nomad. It really depends on what you want. The Jekyll feels better at XC stuff. Pretty light feeling, and climbs decent. But its suspension is pretty lacking when the way back down gets scary. The back end feels very springy, so you have to crank the rebound damping way up, and that packs up your suspension, making it unpredictable and harsh. The Nomad is not a slouch at climbing, but it eats up descents far better than the Jekyll ever could. I've done full-day sufferfest rides on a Nomad, with multiple thousand feet of climbing, and it was not more difficult than it should have been. It climbs better than most AM bikes. But the biggest reason I'd get the Nomad is that it's an absolute beast on technical stuff like rock gardens. It inspires far more confidence than the Cannondale when the trail gets rough, and that is worth something to me, as that is the terrain that I want to be riding. I don't 'seek out' climbs. If you enjoy climbing more than going down and want a bike where you will get to the top quickly, get the Jekyll. If you want to get to the top a minute or so later, but be able to rip back down with complete confidence and high speed, get the Nomad.

Oh, and one more thing to consider. The Jekyll might have that super crazy Fox DYAD shock on it. I'd personally steer clear of that thing. It feels as good as any other shock, that's true. But most shops won't/can't service them if you blow a seal, and you've got to get that custom, ultra low volume DYAD pump to adjust the pressure. Most of my bike trips involve a lot of elevation change, so I use my shock pump a lot. I'd rather have a shock that, if something goes wrong or I forget my shock pump, I have options at any local shop.
 

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On the other hand the Jekyll's rear end and shock mounting area looks so much beefier than the Nomad's. The rear end on the Jekyll is solid.
The way things looks is often not a great indicator of performance. The Jekyll has repeatedly been reviewed as having a solid rear end. Lets not forget that the Nomad C has also been repeatedly reviewed has having a really solid rear as well. I am on my third season on a Nomad C and its rear triangle is stiff and there's nothing flimsy about the shock junction. If there's any flex in either of these bikes it'll be from the rear wheel not the frame design. I think these bikes are both crazy stiff so the decision will be about preference and ride characteristics.
 

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Hi,

Has anyone had any significant ride time on the current Jekyll? Just curious how it is in comparison to the Nomads. I'm an SC fan and currently ride an 03 Heckler and an 06 Blur XC. I ride the Heckler much more than the Blur.

Obvisouly no one has ride time on the new 27.5 versions. But was wondering what people thought about the current versions.

Tried to do a search but couldn't find much.

thanks

jr
I'm in year #6 on a Mk2 Nomad. I ride tight twisty techy forest trails mostly. I travel to Moab and Sedona in the winter for sunshine.

The Nomad is a great all around bike for real all mtn terrain. I climb at the front of the pack with folks on lighter/shorter travel bikes and can bomb any downhills.

I upgraded my rear shock with an Avalanche SSD custom tune and that made a good bike great.

I've ridden my Nomad on XC trails and despite being overkill it wasn't silly.

The new Nomad is more DH oriented and looks like less of an all rounder.

When I bought a new 6" bike recently I went with a Mach 6 which feels like an updated Nomad Mk2. If I was buying another SC bike I'd get a Bronson.

Although the M6 is an improvement over the 2008 Nomad I am rocking - I am pleasantly surprised by how well the old girl compares to a state of the art 2013/14 bike. If I find a good deal on a Mk2 Nomad C I'm going to score it and upgrade my Nomad with some nicer parts.
 

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2 words Jerome Clementz! If that guy can take a 26" wheel Jekyll to victory then that just says how capable the bike is but are you enough rider for a Jekyll? Silly statement I know.

I've owned a Jekyll 3 for nearly 2 years and only just got rid! But only replaced for a 2014 Scott Gambler.

My Jekyll had every thing replaced except the rear shock and frame, Lyrik fork transforms it into a proper weapon and Fox are going to be offering a new tune for older RT2 Dyads so will be even better.

Sorry not had any time on the Nomad so I cannot put in a comparison? But the Jekyll is far more bike than you really need but it's there when things do get tough and techy.
 

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In all fairness though, Gerome Clementz could win on any bike he wanted, as long as the bike holds up. The guy is a beast. And if he breaks or fatigue a frame, no big deal. It just has to last one race. Those guys also get custom valving, linkages, custom frames, factory parts, the works, so they are hardly the same as the bikes mortals like us could afford. The most severe example of this is Cameron Zink. Dude rode the Rampage on a Walmart brand bike last year.
 
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