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170mm going up for sale soon. 165s arrived.

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Condition, early or later version, and price?

I really need some 165s but another set of 170s might come in handy.

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Condition, early or later version, and price?

I really need some 165s but another set of 170s might come in handy.

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Not sure which edition really. Bought new direct last early summer. Condition is very good. I need to clean them and get a good look at them.

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What’s the difference between generations?
They changed the bolt in some significant manner. They wanted $50 to send me the updated part. Apparently the older versions (I ordered my cranks about 22 months ago) users had some issues getting there main bolt out. I don't see any issues however.
Some lightweight 165mm cranks are really the only thing my wife's bike needs. She doesn't need the quality of the Eewings, but I can't locate any cheap 165mm light GXP cranks.

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They changed the bolt in some significant manner. They wanted $50 to send me the updated part. Apparently the older versions (I ordered my cranks about 22 months ago) users had some issues getting there main bolt out. I don't see any issues however.
Some lightweight 165mm cranks are really the only thing my wife's bike needs. She doesn't need the quality of the Eewings, but I can't locate any cheap 165mm light GXP cranks.

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They went from a TI bolt to stainless and changed the size of the hex wrench needed. People were not applying ample TI prep and we're having a difficult time removing the bolt.

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They went from a TI bolt to stainless and changed the size of the hex wrench needed. People were not applying ample TI prep and we're having a difficult time removing the bolt.

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Gotcha - thanks for the scoop.
 

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When you say “use mont a GXP rotor incorrectly,” I’ll assume you meant to say “use/mount a GXP chainring incorrectly.”

Assuming that’s the case, the answer is no. To your point, they only mount one way. And in the case of the eeWings, they mount 180 degrees “upside down” from the way they mount on a SRAM DM crankset. Most of the time the only issue might be covering up some branding/logo on the chainring (which will end up behind the crankarm). Big deal.

The bigger deal for me was:

1) unlike RF cinch, you can’t flip a ring to achieve opposite offset for different chain lines. Flipping round cinch rings works great, but honestly I have no idea what it would do to oval ring clicking. I never tried, and never would.

2) to rectify my bike’s need for a +3 - +4 mm positive offset (not the typical -3mm boost or -6mm traditional chainline), I ordered and installed a Wolftooth CAMO spider SRAM DM. This:



And it does not work with the eeWings. Because Cane Creek opted to make their SRAM DM bolt pattern 180 degrees opposite the way SRAM aligns theirs (ostensibly “the standard...?”) One of the CAMO ring bolts is behind the crankarm and causes the spider to bend. Which causes the chain to come off of your singlespeed when putting down power. Which causes your knee to slam into your stem. Ask me how I know.

I wish the eeWings had worked for me. I’d still be running them. Albeit, still being annoyed with the copper antisieze mess.
Problem solved:

https://www.oneupcomponents.com/collections/switch/products/switch-sdm
 

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why would it matter if the bolt pattern is upside down? it's a four arm spider.... the issue with the camo spider was that the bolt on the fifth arm interfered with the crankarm, right?

they make a 0mm offset... is that not enough?
 

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why would it matter if the bolt pattern is upside down? it's a four arm spider.... the issue with the camo spider was that the bolt on the fifth arm interfered with the crankarm, right?

they make a 0mm offset... is that not enough?
Cool, just looked at the Switch spider and you’re right - the four bolts are positioned so nothing would be behind the crankarm.

So one problem solved for some (probably most).

My problem was with the Switch offset options. I needed the +4mm Wolftooth Camo spider. 0mm wouldn’t clear the chainstay yoke on my bike.
 

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Well hopefully it's not Crank Brothers, Kooka or Race Face...
 

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Nope. The bolt pattern is still upside down. And OneUp doesn’t make a positive offset spider.

There’s a way better titanium crankset option coming. Stay tuned...
Yah, curious as well. Either way, the Eewing market turned out to be a way bigger success than I could have ever imagined.

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Alloys of Titanium and Aluminum have vastly different properties and are not comparable, however Titanium is not lighter than steel, its often stiffer allowing the use of less material which results in lower weight - however there are major drawbacks - all metals fatigue and titanium fatigues roughly 60% faster than stainless steel where its used to save weight.

A great example is motorcycle exhausts - if you buy a stainless steel exhaust its expected to last 5 years, Titanium exhausts are expected to last 2 years.

While cranks wont suffer the same heat cycles they will suffer vibration, abrasion and numerous weight cycles as you load and unload them.

I would stick to modern Aluminum cranks as they are usually just as light and have a lower replacement cost - also its easier through modeling to make the design superior.
 

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Alloys of Titanium and Aluminum have vastly different properties and are not comparable, however Titanium is not lighter than steel, its often stiffer allowing the use of less material which results in lower weight - however there are major drawbacks - all metals fatigue and titanium fatigues roughly 60% faster than stainless steel where its used to save weight.

A great example is motorcycle exhausts - if you buy a stainless steel exhaust its expected to last 5 years, Titanium exhausts are expected to last 2 years.

While cranks wont suffer the same heat cycles they will suffer vibration, abrasion and numerous weight cycles as you load and unload them.

I would stick to modern Aluminum cranks as they are usually just as light and have a lower replacement cost - also its easier through modeling to make the design superior.
Titanium is 45% of the weight of steel.
Titanium has a fatigue limit of 800MPa, whereas steel is 700MPa. (But those are generic numbers. Actual figures applicable to the allow of Eewing cranks may be different, as well as different alloy of steel. But this is just a cursory comparison.)
 

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Alloys of Titanium and Aluminum have vastly different properties and are not comparable, however Titanium is not lighter than steel, its often stiffer allowing the use of less material which results in lower weight - however there are major drawbacks - all metals fatigue and titanium fatigues roughly 60% faster than stainless steel where its used to save weight.

A great example is motorcycle exhausts - if you buy a stainless steel exhaust its expected to last 5 years, Titanium exhausts are expected to last 2 years.

While cranks wont suffer the same heat cycles they will suffer vibration, abrasion and numerous weight cycles as you load and unload them.

I would stick to modern Aluminum cranks as they are usually just as light and have a lower replacement cost - also its easier through modeling to make the design superior.
I respect that you have real life experience with actual constructed 'things', but your conclusions about material properties are just wrong. You could just look this stuff up on wikipedia: density and young's modulus. You'll also find that density and stiffness don't change 'much' with choice of alloy.

Probably you'd be better off drawing conclusions of material properties from properly designed things - like for example airplanes - and not from motorsport exhausts. As colin chapman said: "Any car which holds together for a whole race is too heavy."

So:

Titanium *is* lighter than steel. Steel is almost 2x denser, aluminum is half as dense as titanium.

Titanium is also not stiffer than steel. Steel is ~200, titanium is ~100, aluminum is ~70. That is the fundamental property of the material. You'll find that for stiffness and durability the shape matters at least as much as the material.
 

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As I pointed out from the start alloys and you just made my point, titanium is half the weight at half the stiffness, therefore without additional alloys using steel is the same results for less cost as a pure material. I could go on but having someone refer me to Wikipedia when I was taught about materials from an uncle that worked on most of the black planes and modern guided munitions, I’ll stick with my real world experience.
 

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As I pointed out from the start alloys and you just made my point, titanium is half the weight at half the stiffness, therefore without additional alloys using steel is the same results for less cost as a pure material. I could go on but having someone refer me to Wikipedia when I was taught about materials from an uncle that worked on most of the black planes and modern guided munitions, I’ll stick with my real world experience.
I would also stick to your uncle's opinion. What an awesome resource.

Perhaps our conflict is due to the difference between what you meant and what you wrote?
 
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