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There are several of us on here who have dealt with the big C and come back to "normal" life. I know there are tons of us who are still dealing with it an need some pick-me-up, a message that life ain't over, and for me it will probably never be the same again, but it just might be better!
After AML Leukemia, endless rounds of chemo, remission, relaps, more rounds of chemo, bone marrow stem cell transplant, and a very lengthy rehab I am riding my bike as much as ever. I ride all three of them (road/mtn/cx) with a lot more people and I see more of the country. I'm slower by quite a bit but there are a lot more people to ride with now. At nearly 40 I am getting stronger, making new personal records all the time (post transplant). Most guys my age are just getting slower. I may get faster for another 4-5 years.
I recently had to change careers for health reasons (you can't really be a plumber with a compromised immune system) and am about to start work as a bike mechanic, and I'm absolutely stoked about it! I'm not going to buy a yat with the money I make but a much better environment. Find a job you love and it will be the last day you ever "work".
Every video in my Vimeo and YouTube channels were made post-transplant (see the links in my sig line below).
I know there are people out there just starting the "bad trip" and really need to read about what is after.

For those of you that haven't read it there is a thread on here of the ongoing, start to present, play-by play, of one of our own MTBRers with AML. It is long but interesting and worth reading if you are on a similar path.
https://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=500278

Anyway, if you have a good story I know I'd love to hear it and I'm sure there some that Need it. How are you kicking ass now?



 

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since 4/10/2009
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I'm there. Just hit 30 3 months ago and am nearly 2 years post-dx. Chemo alone got me into remission, and I've been there ever since.

I'm riding more now than I was immediately before my diagnosis, but then again, I'm in the last year of my master's degree work. At the time of my diagnosis, I was in the middle of field work and I had no time to ride.

I plan to finish my degree by the end of the year and get on with life.
 

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ol'guy who says hi &waves
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Not Me, My Daughter

She was diagnosed with leukemia at age 17.

Bone marrow transplant at 18

Told transplant was unsuccesful and unable to bear children due to chemo at 19

Picture is of her 18 month old son (my grandson) watching his mom playing coed soccer at 23.

She and two other cancer survivors are members of my 24hr mtb race team in June.
 

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I had what some people call the "good cancer". Let me tell you that's a bunch of crap. Thyroid Cancer SUCKS. 2 years post op and I know my life will never be the same. I had full Thyroid removal and I never knew what the Thyroid did until I lost mine. I'll be on medication the rest of my life. I try to pretend I'm 100% back to normal but I know I'm not and never will be.

Two months after surgery I did a charity bike ride to prove to my self that cancer had not beat me. That got me motivated and I bought a nice road bike. A few months later I traded in my Hybrid for a real Mountain Bike and upgraded to a 29er in January this year. I walked into the LBS to return a $12 part and walked out with a new 29er.

I'll be 50 this year. I'm not the fastest guy out there and never will be. I walk around things other people ride right through or over. But I have never felt more alive than I do when I'm out in the woods.

Cancer SUCKS but I don't know if I would be out in the woods if I never had it.
 

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9 lives
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I was diagnosed with stage 3 cancer exactly 1 year ago. I have not stopped riding and have not missed a day of work. DH all last summer, 2 vacation trips including Whiteface Mountain, NY, Mount Ste Anne Que ) Despite surgery, T&C chemo, radiation and all the terrible side effects I kept going.

I am still receiving IV chemo until October this year so we are fitting in a trip to BC Okanagan in June between treatments

Winters put a slight damper on riding here so I took lessons and learned to down hill ski. I will not stop doing the things I love. Or learn new things. My husband has been my greatest support. He's built up a new kick-arse DH bike for me .. can't wait to ride it.
 

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I feel like a cheater here.....

However, I did have cancer a few years ago but it was stage one prostate and it was caught very early. I had my prostate removed, no chemo nor any other treatments were necessary and three years later I am cancer free. I.E. PSA is zero or whatever the lowest reading is (< 1?).

Like I said, I feel like I'm cheating to even consider myself a cancer survivor but I suppose I am.

The biggest problem was a damned foley bag for three weeks and three months to recouperate but no big deal in the end. I'm still having some reconstructive surgery to take care of after effects of the prostate removal but, again, they are not a big deal and I'm fortunate to have a good health insurance plan at work so everything is covered.

Lets just say that up until the last "reconstuctive surgery" a week ago, I really appreciated a good pad in my bike shorts. :thumbsup: Seems that the fourth time on that type of surgery is the charm.

FYI. I'm 61 now.
 

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Neuroblastoma when I was 2 months old. Pretty much disappeared by the time I was 3 or 4. I am now 32, married with 3 children. I know I am lucky and am thankful even though I can't really remember any of it, but I still get said knowing how many aren't that lucky. I guess all we can do is live our lives as best we can.
 

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the moon master
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good thread. i lost my aunt to cancer about 5 years ago. my fiancee is a survivor, and kicking butt on her mountain and road bikes now...i'll see if she has anything to add. stay strong, folks.
 

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Yes, d_m_b's fiancee does have something to add

Wow. This is a good thread, you all rock, thanks for starting it fullsailbiker!
I was diagnosed at 21 with a softball-sized tumor called a primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Had chemo, surgery (got a kick ass scar), and radiation. Right after remission I was up for any challenge - I did the polar bear plunge a few years, took spontaneous road trips, performed in a burlesque show...haven't done any of that in a while though.
I didn't start riding until years after remission. d_m_b is responsible for getting me hooked on mountain and road biking. I love going out riding just us or a big group. I am much more active overall than I ever was pre-cancer. I can't believe I'm almost at 7yrs remission!!
Cyclelicious, you are especially bad ass considering you are riding while still going thru chemo! I love it!
Fred-da-trog, I hope I am as lucky as your daughter, we will see.
tjchad - sorry to be a downer, but cancer has only gotten more curable for certain age-groups. Survival rates for 15-35 yr olds have not improved in 30 yrs. Sucks, but a little awareness goes a long way. So support your charity of choice and keep kicking butt!!
 

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since 4/10/2009
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BottledZen said:
Survival rates for 15-35 yr olds have not improved in 30 yrs. Sucks, but a little awareness goes a long way. So support your charity of choice and keep kicking butt!!
I've heard the upper end of that scale extended to 40.

Regardless, in light of that info, it really is awesome to see so many young adult survivors kicking @$$ and taking names.
 

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Great topic. I just passed my 20 year anniversary since I was diagnosed with Hodgkins in 1991. I was 13 years old a that time. The chemo and radiaiton drained my energy so much I wasn't able to ride much during that time. I remember how bummed I felt when my scout troop took off for a Moab trip and I couldn't go. After 12 cycles of chemotherapy, a catheter in the chest and a month of radiation I was in remission. When I was a teenager it made me uncomfortable to talk about the whole experience but now I am open and grateful to have experienced what I did.
 

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humber river advocate
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cyclelicious said:
I was diagnosed with stage 3 cancer exactly 1 year ago. I have not stopped riding and have not missed a day of work. DH all last summer, 2 vacation trips including Whiteface Mountain, NY, Mount Ste Anne Que ) Despite surgery, T&C chemo, radiation and all the terrible side effects I kept going.

I am still receiving IV chemo until October this year so we are fitting in a trip to BC Okanagan in June between treatments

Winters put a slight damper on riding here so I took lessons and learned to down hill ski. I will not stop doing the things I love. Or learn new things. My husband has been my greatest support. He's built up a new kick-arse DH bike for me .. can't wait to ride it.
kicking a$$!!!

 

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April 2nd will be my four year anniversary of being diagnoised with stage 2 testicular cancer. I remember it well as we celebrated my daughter's first first brthday the previous day. Although I am now unable to have any more children I am grateful for what I have and I am riding harder and more often than ever.
 
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