Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
SS rings and cogs are not ramped or pinned. So could you turn them around periodically to extend the life of your drivetrain? Seems like the backside of the teeth would have little or no wear compared to the side than the side that is biting the chain.
 

·
Out spokin'
In cog? Neato!
Joined
·
14,508 Posts
yup

cwfish said:
SS rings and cogs are not ramped or pinned. So could you turn them around periodically to extend the life of your drivetrain? Seems like the backside of the teeth would have little or no wear compared to the side than the side that is biting the chain.
Yes. Only problem with flopping a chainring is that most of them have chamfered bolt holes. But you can still do it.

--Sparty
 

·
wot no bike?
Joined
·
1,056 Posts
Sparticus said:
Yes. Only problem with flopping a chainring is that most of them have chamfered bolt holes. But you can still do it.
Even just rotating your chainring by a bolt can be helpful as most people have probably noticed that the most-torqued teeth on your chainring show greater wear/burring.
 

·
mudnthebloodnthebeer
Joined
·
585 Posts
Yep, I'm on the "back side" of King cogs on 2 bikes with no problems. Surly and Boone cogs are slightly asymmetrical with regard to the position of the teeth over the base so there might be some minor chainline adjustments to deal with in those cases. Best to do this at the same time you're installing a new chain.

I've also flopped chainrings, but it's a little more involved. Without the chamfer you need to make certain that you have enough thread engagement if you're using 6mm bolts, and some chainring/crank combos might require a bit of Dremel work on the inside radius of the ring in order to clear the drive side crankarm.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top