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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My fiance and I want to get into biking and I am looking for a cheap, but decent set of starter bikes. I came across these two on the local CL. It is honestly more than I want to spend, but from what I have seen Cannondales seem to be a good quality bike. They didn't give any specifice, so I can't determine what model they are to research to make sure it is worth the price.

Any help and opinions are very much appreciated:thumbsup:

http://cincinnati.craigslist.org/bik/2150744757.html

Thanks,
Mitch
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Here is the info from the add so you don't have to use the link if you don't want.

Cannondale, His ans Hers - $200

I have a set of His and Hers Cannondale Mountain Bicycles. I am selling each for $200 or both for $350. Great condition ready to ride.

Thanks Again!
 

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R.I.P. DogFriend
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Those look to be at least pre-mid-90's bikes (old school Cannondale logo, five bolt cranks, cantilever brakes and quill stems), but look to be in good condition. They would be good for path rides and fire roads that are not too steep. As for true trail duty, there are more suitable bikes out there, but you could ride easier 'trails' on them if you wanted without too much trouble.

If they are in decent condition, I would rather have them than a comparably priced department store bike. JMHO.
 

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$200 sounds pretty steep to me. Its hard to tell from the pics but I would guess that's an entry level to mid level bike from the early 90's. Probably less than $500 new back then. I would look for something much newer for $200.

The main problem with that bike is when you start replacing parts you will be replacing alot. If your brakes go out it will be hard to find caltilever brakes that work good now. So you say i'll convert to v-brakes, they are only $10 a set. Well now you have to change your brake levers too. Well they are probably part of the shifter so you have to replace that too. Then your looking at 9 speed shifters so you say i'll conver to nine speed. Then you have to replace your cassette, chain, front sprockets, etc etc. Everything thing on that bike is out dated compared to todays standards. Just something to think about.
 

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I've seen those on Craigslist, $200 is very steep for each. You can get a brand new Giant Boulder or similar bike for not much more (I think like $269 each) and that would be a comparable bike to what's on Craigslist, just muuuch newer.
 

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Well it's nice to see that CO doesn't have the only people on crack when it comes to old bike prices. :)
$200-250 for the pair wouldn't be too bad of deal. Cdale frames from that era are US made and alot of the time were the same as the higher end bikes, just had different components. However, it's like Brent said above...fixing old bikes is now a "give a moose a muffin"* proposition. There really aren't quality 7spd parts anymore aside from vintage hunting. Check the brakes to see if there is a plastic housing over the spring. If so, it's probably cracked and letting the brake drag and you have to replace the brake. Small parts are not available (thanks Shimano). Plus side is there are decent canti's available at good prices, thanks CX.

*Sorry, if you don't have kids the "give a moose a muffin" reference is a story about one thing leading to another.
 

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DSFA said:
$200-250 for the pair wouldn't be too bad of deal. Cdale frames from that era are US made and alot of the time were the same as the higher end bikes, just had different components.
Those are M200...about 1995. I remember that color and remember those models. Their base model frame that years was US made as all C'dales were back then but there is nothing special beyond that (low end Trek and even Huffy was US made back then). It is NOT the same frame as their higher end bikes, not even close. It's a strait gauge 6061-T6 aluminum frame with Altus and Acera-X components. For riding bike paths they would be fine, I wouldn't buy one thinking your going to do much else. They look like they're well maintained and I would consider them better than what you can get for $150-$200 new as long as you don't think you'll be upgrading much (especially the fork, since a 1" threaded suspension fork that works with cantilever brakes is non-existent these days).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wow, thanks for all the helpful responses! As it turns out, I just got an email from the seller, and they are gone. You all have given me some usefull information, and some more direction, so all is not lost.

sasquatch rides a SS said:
I've seen those on Craigslist, $200 is very steep for each. You can get a brand new Giant Boulder or similar bike for not much more (I think like $269 each) and that would be a comparable bike to what's on Craigslist, just muuuch newer.
Are Giants decent bikes for starters. I have seen a decent amount of Boulders and Rincons in the 100 range. What do you guys think about those?
 

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Boulders and Rincons are very much entry level mountain bikes. They will get you out there and riding. If you are the type to push limits and ride a lot, you may find yourself looking for more after a bit. But that is what an entry level bike is supposed to do. It gets you out there to see if this whole scene is something you'd like to do often. If it is, then ride your entry level bike, replacing only what breaks with modest replacement parts, saving your sheckels for something nicer down the road when you figure out exactly the type of bike you really want.

If you and the wife/gf are just looking for some occasional exercise, they will get the job done reliably.and economically.

If you are riding real MTB trails, a real MTB is the way to go. But if you're actually just 'path' or dirt road riding, a hybrid will also do that just fine and you (and/or your wife/gf) might prefer the slightly more upright riding position of a hybrid vs. the more agressive and leaned forward riding position of a mountain bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
jeffj said:
If you are riding real MTB trails, a real MTB is the way to go. But if you're actually just 'path' or dirt road riding, a hybrid will also do that just fine and you (and/or your wife/gf) might prefer the slightly more upright riding position of a hybrid vs. the more agressive and leaned forward riding position of a mountain bike.
Thanks for the advice. We are also interested in getting something for our 2 year old son to come along also. From what you mentioned about the more upright position of the hybrid, that may be more what we are looking for. What is the consensus of riding light MTB trails with a child carrier? Is is acceptable or tolerable?

I imagine we are mostly going to be occasional riders, but I have a feeling I may want to take on some more difficult trails. I also enjoy my Jeep and dirt bike, so this is right up my alley, just more work.:D
 
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