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The Lefty rules.

sky84 said:
what are the advantages and disadvantages of having a left fork then non left. for example jekyll 600 has regular fork, and jekyll 800 has left fork.
Quicker tube changes. Truer steering, particularly in the long run. (needle bearings instead of bushings.) American made. (If that matters.) Better damping than most. Questions?
 

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hm....thanks for your advice. this is kinda off the subject but well i'm deciding between jekyll 600 disk and jekyll 800, both are same bikes except the 800 one is leffy. i'm not an expert in mtb; however, just for my type of bike riding (some steep climbs, rock gardens, xc county, etc....) which do you think will be better for my type of riding?
 

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That depends on you.

sky84 said:
hm....thanks for your advice. this is kinda off the subject but well i'm deciding between jekyll 600 disk and jekyll 800, both are same bikes except the 800 one is leffy. i'm not an expert in mtb; however, just for my type of bike riding (some steep climbs, rock gardens, xc county, etc....) which do you think will be better for my type of riding?
The Lefty is sweet. It is a great match for the Jekyll frameset. There is a reason that the Lefty is on the Upper end Jekylls.

If the extra $ are not an issue, go for it. The 800 also gets hydro brakes, if I remember right.
 

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I had the same decision about a month ago and went with the 800. For the extra few hundred bucks, I thought it was worth the better fork and brakes. Also the 600 Disc isn't cheap either.

This is my first mountain bike, so for what it is worth, I really like the ride on the lefty.
 

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I love my 800

I bought a Jekyll 800 a month ago and I really like the bike. The front shocks front and rear are great. The only thing I am working to change is a new set of lighter tires and add Stans.
 

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Lefty

another vote for the lefty. i have been riding a lefty for almost 4 years and it is by far the best fork i have ever used. it still amazes me how many times it saves my butt during a ride. i rode a friends bike with a marzochi (another good company) fork on it, and i almost killed myself because i was used to the lefty and how it tracked.

the only real way to appreciate it is to ride it for a while and then go to something else for a ride. after that you will never go away from it!

Just my $.02 :D
 

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I had my first ride on a Lefty DLR-equipped Scalpel the other day and coming from a normal fork, I noticed a slight amount of assistance & resistance when cornering. When turning left, the fork assists you and when turning right, there is a little resistance. I assume this is because there's an unequal amount of weight on either side of the wheel. It took me a little while to compensate, but it's not hugely noticeable and the feel of the fork is fantastic.
 

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Lefty

mtbykr said:
another vote for the lefty. i have been riding a lefty for almost 4 years and it is by far the best fork i have ever used. it still amazes me how many times it saves my butt during a ride. i rode a friends bike with a marzochi (another good company) fork on it, and i almost killed myself because i was used to the lefty and how it tracked.

the only real way to appreciate it is to ride it for a while and then go to something else for a ride. after that you will never go away from it!

Just my $.02 :D
Exactly right!!! I have a Carbon Fiber Lefty DLR on my '03 Scalpel and a Lefty MAX TPC+ on my '04 Jekyll and wouldn't trade for either.
 

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ReflexPoint said:
I had my first ride on a Lefty DLR-equipped Scalpel the other day and coming from a normal fork, I noticed a slight amount of assistance & resistance when cornering. When turning left, the fork assists you and when turning right, there is a little resistance. I assume this is because there's an unequal amount of weight on either side of the wheel. It took me a little while to compensate, but it's not hugely noticeable and the feel of the fork is fantastic.
If it's on a scalpel with narrow bars and dual control shifter/brake combo, it's probably the wires that are getting in the way of your steering... The Scalpel are pretty hard to set up with narrow bars and the lefty... I had a lefty Ti on my Cannondale F1000 Woody two years ago and miss it a lot... I love my Manitou Minute fork this year but i will go back to the Lefty MAX next year with the Prophet!

And to return to the original topic: Go for the lefty if you can afford it, you'll never regret that move! Plus, you'll get Hayes hydros instead of the Avid mec discs... Really worth the upgrade!
 

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Mmm.. The cables seem to have ample slack and I have a riser bar cut down an inch on either end and Rapidfire shifters. I do have a longish stem though which could be amplifying the feeling (as I said though, it's only very slight). Any physics degrees out there? Is it something to do with the gyroscopic forces applied as the wheel is turned or is it just my imagination?
 

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ReflexPoint said:
Mmm.. The cables seem to have ample slack and I have a riser bar cut down an inch on either end and Rapidfire shifters. I do have a longish stem though which could be amplifying the feeling (as I said though, it's only very slight). Any physics degrees out there? Is it something to do with the gyroscopic forces applied as the wheel is turned or is it just my imagination?
Sorry Reflex - it's all in your imagination (or some dodgy headset bearings, or your wheel is incorrectly dished...).
No 'regular' fork will balance evenly either - usually spring in one leg and compression in the other, so for the most part, each leg is working against the other (spring in one and oil in the other) when it counts anyway.
There are gyro forces at work (spin a wheel, hold it by the QR and twist to check) but relatively, it's negligible.

I'd check your dish (put a wide ruler down the hollow stem and check it's relationship with the rim - tyre off is easier) or that your bars are centred.
 

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Are you sure? Consider this.. Hold the bike by the saddle perfectly upright and push it along. The front wheel will slowly turn to the left. Leaning the bike slightly to the left will result in the front wheel turning to the left almost immediately. Leaning the bike slightly to the right (thus compensating for the extra mass on the left of the wheel) results in the front wheel staying straight, but leaning it further still will result in the front wheel eventually turning to the right. Don't you think this same effect will apply when you're on the bike turning into a corner? My 'standard forked' bike would track straight when pushed along in a perfectly upright position.
 

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ReflexPoint said:
Are you sure? Consider this.. Hold the bike by the saddle perfectly upright and push it along. The front wheel will slowly turn to the left. Leaning the bike slightly to the left will result in the front wheel turning to the left almost immediately. Leaning the bike slightly to the right (thus compensating for the extra mass on the left of the wheel) results in the front wheel staying straight, but leaning it further still will result in the front wheel eventually turning to the right. Don't you think this same effect will apply when you're on the bike turning into a corner? My 'standard forked' bike would track straight when pushed along in a perfectly upright position.
yep, I'm sure. If your wheel is aligned correctly then it doesn't matter how it is actually held there. If your bike turns, I'd say your dish is not perfect. Have a look at a few motorbikes - they're not symetric at all usually, particularly at the rear.
The forces at work during cornering are magnitudes above the minor weight of the shock, thus rendering it negligible (when travelling at any sort of speed). You'll also find that your body weighs more on one side than the other, possibly more than the weight of the shock too.....
Very few riders can corner equally as well both sides - it's one of those skills to practice.

Just a question to illustrate - when you apply a disc brake does it pull you to the left?
 
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