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I have a set of like-new Enve M70 wheels with DT swiss 240 hubs: 100x15 front, 142x12 Rear with shimano 10-speed free hub and cassette.

Is it possible to move these over to my new bike, which has boost spacing and a Sram GX Eagle 12-speed drive train? I *think* I could buy

1) boost spacers
2) Sram driver for the 240 rear hub (although I can't figure out whether this actually works for Sram 12 speed, and which part I need to buy?)

Finally - I this worth doing? Or is it mistake, and I should just sell the wheels and buy a set of Light Bicycle 30mm inner width rims and boost hubs? Pricing wise it would be a wash, and the LB rims would be about 100 grams lighter, possibly more comfortable (if you believe in that), and maybe less durable? But I think LB is pretty good these days.

Thanks for any tips on how to do this - and whether it's a mistake to try.
 

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There are some hack spacers to convert 6 bolt hubs to boost, but they aren't great for the rear.

In the front, you just add 5mm to each side, and a 5mm spacer to the disc with longer screws. It gives you none of the advantages of boost, with the added potential of failures from a weaker disc mount. BUT, it technically works.

The rear is more complex. you cant just put 3mm on each end worth of spacer. You need to leave the casette side as is, and put 6mm on the disc side, and a disc spacer. and then re-dish the wheel over 3mm.

i dont see this being worth doing really. I would sell the wheels and buy proper boost ones.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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I’m running a non boost rear wheel on my pivot boost frame, works great, the spacers are smaller than front boost spacers so it’s usually well within a derailleur adjustment range. There are a bunch of kits on eBay and Amazon for cheap. They work great. There is no re-dishing the wheel, you buy the kits with the equal size spacers.
 

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^^^ I intentionally run a non-boost offset crank with boost rear. Biasing the rings toward the larger cogs works better IMO. I have the clearance between ring and chainstay and chain and tire for it to work.

For a while, Wolf Tooth had a white paper on the advantages of doing so on their website. IDK if they still do.
 

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^^^ I intentionally run a non-boost offset crank with boost rear. Biasing the rings toward the larger cogs works better IMO. I have the clearance between ring and chainstay and chain and tire for it to work.

For a while, Wolf Tooth had a white paper on the advantages of doing so on their website. IDK if they still do.
if you subscribe to that idea (which i do myself) this would make the mod even worse as your non boost crank would become only 'normal' and a boost crank would be extra biased to the little cogs.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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So you don't run a boost chain line. Does the bike have a boost crank?

Interesting that it works. I would have expected problems.
What kind of problems? Adjust your derailleur limit, possibly let a few mm of slack out of the shift cable, and ride on. Building new wheels or buying new wheels just to put on a boost frame is insanely inefficient and wasteful IMO. You can usually get a variety of chainring offsets these days for non-shimano cranks too, but as stated above, this works perfectly, no issues. Already tested it and running two non-boost wheelsets on this boost frame.

 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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Chain line matters, no? The line to the big cog is often already pretty extreme isn't it?
Here's what it looks like in the middle. If there is some slightly elevated chain wear, no big deal I say. 3mm is pretty small and unless there are some extreme circumstances, I don't see there being any issues. Most frames are not going to be exact and a mm or two off is just part of the variance, so it appears to be within the tolerances that work. I've been pounding it uphill too. Ran it hard out in Texas a few weeks ago. If going to super-boost, we'd probably have an actual issue with derailleur range and chainlines.

Bicycle accessory Shotgun Air gun Synthetic rubber Shadow
 

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I have left the drive side as is and spaced the disc side 6 mm. Need a longer axle, a 6 mm spacer with 12 mm inside diameter hole, plus the disc spacer and longer bolts.
You will be able to use same length spoke each side and can end up having a near dishless rear wheel (so some advantage).
Also I used a Roberts axle because I don't trust the super light DT one (single speeders are breaking them without any crazy adapters).
Spacers and stronger axle will add a bit of weight though
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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I have left the drive side as is and spaced the disc side 6 mm. Need a longer axle, a 6 mm spacer with 12 mm inside diameter hole, plus the disc spacer and longer bolts.
You will be able to use same length spoke each side and can end up having a near dishless rear wheel (so some advantage).
Also I used a Roberts axle because I don't trust the super light DT one (single speeders are breaking them without any crazy adapters).
Spacers and stronger axle will add a bit of weight though
Need a longer axle? The bike comes with the axle, shouldn't need anything there. You can, as you point out, order spacers ad-hoc off of Amazon and Ebay, as in specifying ID, OD and thickness, but there are so many kits to choose from it makes no sense to do otherwise.
 
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