Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm converting an old yard sale road bike to use as an SS commuter/ grocery getter. I replaced the original 6 speed freewheel with a single 16 tooth BMX freewheel. I figured the chainline between the freewheel and the 42 tooth ring wouldn't line up perfectly, but I thought maybe I'd get lucky enough. Of course I didn't The chainline is definitely off.

So here's the question. I'm getting conflicting opinions on whether I can tinker with the wheel enough to get it the chain in lline--either by using spacers or redishing the wheel or both--or if it's a lost cause and I should just replace it with a new wheel. I'd rather use the old equipment, since the idea was to keep this cheap.

Any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
i just used the five speed freewheel on an old trek 800. take off the two smallest cogs with two chainwhips, remove the rest of the freewheel, then thread back on the 2nd smallest cog. its usually a 17 or 18t, and lines up pretty well with the stock chainring. it works rather well too.

this is what i, and people who know what they are doing with bikes did. there may be other ways. who knows. but this worked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
If you know how to redish your wheel it's the cheapest option.

If you have to pay someone, then maybe a different secondhand wheel may be cheaper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,902 Posts
zasky said:
So here's the question. I'm getting conflicting opinions on whether I can tinker with the wheel enough to get it the chain in lline--either by using spacers or redishing the wheel or both--or if it's a lost cause and I should just replace it with a new wheel. I'd rather use the old equipment, since the idea was to keep this cheap.
To imporve the chain line, you need to re-dish the wheel (or remove the dish) and re-space the axle. If it is an old shimano axle, it pretty easy. For others, as long as it's a threaded axle, it should not be too hard - you'll need to determine if it's metric (usually 10mm) or english (usually 3/8"). Re-dishing may require new spokes, every wheel is different. I've done this to some old higher-end freewheel hubs (ie: a really nice old Dura-ace freewheel hub), they make great SS wheels.

Cheers,

Tom
 

·
Mtn Biker Machinist
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Used to be an adapter

for sale on e-bay that would thread on to the freewheel hub and had another thread further out to put the single freewheel on in the right chainline. I have one on my commuter on an older exage freewheel hub and it works well. I tried to search for one on ebay, but can't seem to find any :confused: good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the help guys. I re-spaced and re-dished the rear wheel, and now the chain line is spot on.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top