Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
sorry if this is a silly qn, but i'm hoping to ride a little easier on the road. doing this for my wife actually as we're planning a 100km road trip.


the qn is will the 9 speed cassette fit like a glove for the mtb? also, by changing to the road cassette,


Is it a must to change into a 9 speed road rear d? (i am hoping not as it will increase my expenditure. also, my mtb xt rear d works perfectly now)


thks guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,536 Posts
With a road cassette you are only gaining different gear ratios and a smaller change in between gears. Your highest gear will still be an 11 or 12 tooth cog. If you keep the same or very similar gear ratios, you will not go faster.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,633 Posts
frenchbulldog said:
one more question..

may i know what are the pros of changing into a road cassette?

it will enable the rider to ride faster and more efficiently on the road?

is this right?
the pros are you are forced into using a higher gear when climbing....meaning you go faster up hill.....

as far as road.....slick tires will be a bigger benefit.....that and a skinsuit ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,878 Posts
you're not really gonna go any faster because you biggest gear is still only gonna be 44-11, thats assuming that your cranks have a 44 tooth big ring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,033 Posts
emtnate said:
It will be harder while climbing, but, assuming the rider can keep up, they will go faster.
a mountain cassette will have basically all the gears a road cassette will, plus more. wont go any faster at all, it'll just be harder.

its just for weight.. if its dead flat you can get into the cadence thing.. but its still mostly weight.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,633 Posts
One Pivot said:
a mountain cassette will have basically all the gears a road cassette will, plus more. wont go any faster at all, it'll just be harder.

its just for weight.. if its dead flat you can get into the cadence thing.. but its still mostly weight.
ummm.....as a general rule, harder=faster when climbing....ya goof :p

and no, it is not just for weight savings....:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,536 Posts
One Pivot said:
a mountain cassette will have basically all the gears a road cassette will, plus more. wont go any faster at all, it'll just be harder.

its just for weight.. if its dead flat you can get into the cadence thing.. but its still mostly weight.
Correct - the comment was in jest in reference to CHUM's response. If you are forced to climb the hill with a 26 tooth cog as opposed to a 32, and can keep up the cadence, it stands to reason you will be climbing faster and pedaling much harder.
 

·
Just Joshin' ya!
Joined
·
1,980 Posts
A road cassette on a mountain bike (unless you are downhilling or really trying to save weight) does not make any sense because you already have those ratios on the MTB cassette plus you have lower gears for climbing. The big difference between road gearing and mountain gearing is in the front chain rings. The biggest chainring on a mountain crankset is 44 teeth, the biggest chain ring on a road crankset is 53 teeth. The bigger chainring on the front is what allows for a roadbike to go a further distance than a mountain bike with one pedal stroke in its highest gear.

I downhill with people who run road bike cassettes on their downhill bikes because it allows for one to easily run a short cage derailleur with no worry of tearing off the cage. Other than that, I have heard of of XC racers who run a road cassette because they are so strong, they don't need the climbing gears so they save weight.

Unless you are going to get bigger chainrings up front, it won't make a difference.
 

·
Bicyclochondriac.
Joined
·
14,894 Posts
frenchbulldog said:
sorry if this is a silly qn, but i'm hoping to ride a little easier on the road. doing this for my wife actually as we're planning a 100km road trip.

the qn is will the 9 speed cassette fit like a glove for the mtb? also, by changing to the road cassette,

Is it a must to change into a 9 speed road rear d? (i am hoping not as it will increase my expenditure. also, my mtb xt rear d works perfectly now)

thks guys!
Yes, the cassette will fit, but why do you want to do it? What benefit do you hope to gain?

You will get closer spaced gear ratios, but will also loose your lowest gears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,762 Posts
There is one other benefit...

to a road cassette. Others have mentioned it but none have expounded on it. That is the closer gearing. In road riding cadance (the rpm at which your turn the pedals) is everything. The faster the cadance the faster you go, and the goal for most riders is to maintain their best cadance throughout the ride. The closer ratios in the rear allow them to fine tune their gear ratios to maintain their best cadance. Many hardcore roadies will even have a couple of different rear wheels set up with different cassettes for different conditions, flat, hilly, etc. And professional sponsored racers will even have several different bikes set up for different stages of a race, think Tour de France and the like.

However, with a heavier mountain bike there isn't much of an advantage to it. If your goal is to go faster on the flats with an mtb, your best bet would be to go with larger chain rings up front. With a modern (within the last 3 years or so) XT front derailleur and a long cage rear der, you should be able to go with a 46 to 48 tooth big ring and mated to an 11-32 cassette with no problem. Just make sure that you bump up your middle and small rings the same amount as your big ring, i.e. if you go with a 48T big ring, bump you small ring to a 26T and your middle to a 36T to maintain the your minimum and maximum capacities of the front derailleur. It'll preclude any shifting problems up front.

Bottom line is, you can make the MTB faster, just not through fiddling with the rear.:thumbsup:

Good Dirt
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top