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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hydraulic brakes are new to me so please take it easy!! I just replaced the rear pads on my Juicy 7's, to push the pistons in I had to open the bleed screw and let some fluid out. As a result the brake lever comes fairly close to the grip when braking. Can I top off the reservoir to replace some of the fluid that was lost (which wasn't a lot) to make the lever firmer? Yesterday I purchased a bleed kit but I’m hesitant to use it because I’ve never bleed brakes before. I'm leaving for North* tomorrow and don't want to mess anything up. Any suggestions?
 

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No, that's not phonetic
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There are a few strange things going on here. First off, you should be able to push the pistons in without removing fluid from the system. I guess you must have really had way too much fluid in there. Secondly, you can have bubbles in the reservoir without it leading to spongy brakes (pulling the lever to the bar). So when you removed fluid from the res, even if you introduced air, it should not have automatically changed the feel at the lever. You need to get air beyond the reservoir and into the lines for the brakes to feel soft. One thing the res does is provide a place for bubbles to escape to and so not offer a compressible void between the master and slave cylinders.

Assuming that you did indeed get air in the lines (which it sounds like you did), I think it would make a LOT of sense to bleed the system. It is not that hard and the Juicy bleed kit comes with good instructions. It's pretty painless. Just do it. You have already "messed things up" :) so it's time to fix it.
 

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Dirt Deviant
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Bleeding brakes is a snap. If you find the instructions unclear, just search YouTube for an instructional video.
It usually takes me about 5-ish minutes per brake to bleed. It's rather easy. If you can change your pads, you can bleed your brakes.
Get out all the tools you will need, and read over the instructions a couple times while looking at the brake system on your bike, and when it all makes sense, go for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Then I'll give it a shot! The bleed kit came with brake fluid, how many bleeds should I get out of it? Im assuming its enough for both brakes, should there be enough left over for a second bleed? Thanks for the help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
One more question and I know its a dumb one. Do I let the old brake fluid out of the system before I start. Or is it pushed out when I push the new fluid into the caliper.
Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
jahguideini said:
One more question and I know its a dumb one. Do I let the old brake fluid out of the system before I start. Or is it pushed out when I push the new fluid into the caliper.
Thanks.
Can anyone tell me. I've watched the video and read the directions but neither explain this.
 

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Bleeding removes air from the system. The new brake fluid will replace the space air was taking up. You don't need to worry about the old fluid, your just removing air and topping off the system.
 

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jahguideini said:
Can anyone tell me. I've watched the video and read the directions but neither explain this.
Yes you should bleed out the old fluid. DOT fluid absorbs water over time which leads spongy levers under long hard braking conditions. Water turns to a compressible vapor when the brakes overheats. DOT fluid is cheap and readily available at auto stores so there's no need to crimp on it.

You also can't tell if you got all the air bubbles out unless bleed out the old fluid.
 
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