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Hi.

I just recently purchased an Interloc Tempest Frame to build a new bike.

The ride quality is great, and the frame hasn't failed me yet.
I don't know about IRD's other products, but if they are the same quality as the frame, it should be good stuff.
 

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Go faster
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IRD has been around since the 80's, when MTB hit the mainstream. I heard they started out making seatposts, which was a design that was lightweight, and didn't slip. I know they made Ti rigid forks in the early 90's. Now, if you go to their website, they have started making as much as possible. I have one of their Cx (crossfire) frames built up w/ one of their stem's, headsets, forks, and rims. The stuff holds up very well. http://www.interlocracing.com/
 

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Old man on a bike
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Just from memory, so I could be wrong, but

I'm pretty sure that, while the brand is still around, the original owners aren't and that they currently do not manufacture their own stuff, it's outsourced (Taiwan I think). I looked at their website recently when researching road/cross frames and it alluded to continuous operation but didn't really say by who, just where they had been located; don't think it said a thing about making the stuff either other than saying they were no longer in the machine shop in the shed mode (but then the name is Interloc Racing Design ). I seem to remember that where I read about the change in ownership and subsequent offshoring it mentioned that for a while they had closed their doors before the company was bought...if I'm mistaken on this I'll personally send Interloc an apology...anyone know?

I do remember winning something from them at a booth at the Revenge of the Siskiyous race back in the early 90's where you got something for accurately guessing the weight of your own bike (a rigid Bianchi Super Grizzly that weighed 26.5 pounds)...can't remember what I won though. Seemed like nice guys though, hope I'm wrong and that they survived all these years intact.
 

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Outsourced

Bikinfoolferlife said:
I'm pretty sure that, while the brand is still around, the original owners aren't and that they currently do not manufacture their own stuff, it's outsourced (Taiwan I think).
I don't know anything about IRD previous initiatives, but their new Tempest (XC / MTB) frame is made in Taiwan....I just built one up for a buddy of mine. I have a Jamis Dragon frame that I built up, and they look like they came from the same factory....same welds, red paint color is identical.

Some weirdness with the Tempest, is the roadie style cable routing, can't say I liked that much, oh well not my bike.

All in all, nice riding steel frame, same as the Dragon.
 

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VEGAN ATHLETE Racing
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I got a buncha IRD parts in a build kit a coupla years ago. All I kept of it was a seatpost and the Hydraulic Disc Brakes (which they no longer make). Seat post is fine, the brakes blow. The hydraulic line has the namebrand "Starbike" on it. That may answer your off shore production question. Oh, and customer service has been less than good.
 

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I'm using one of their 10spd Sport chains on my Campy road bike. Works flawlessly and is alot cheaper than a Campy chain and easier to take on and off than a Shimano chain. If SRAM made a 10spd chain I'd probably use it but the IRD works perfectly fine.
 

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the original IRD

IRD originally comprised the duo of Rod Moses and the late Ray Baldwin. I believe that's correct, their first component was a 2-bolt seatpost. A good post. I'm still riding one of the originals.
Also riding one of their triple clamp rigid forks, the legs of mine are 2000 aluminum, they also made ti legs.
The fork has movable brake bosses. On them is an IRD Rotary brake, a center pull design that uses an eccentrically mounted large roller on one arm to push against a small roller on the other arm, with a potential mechanical advantage of 30:1. Unfortunately this highest possible mechanical advantage is achieved just before the large roller slips past the small one,rendering the brake nonfunctional. So adjusting the pads to prevent this you end up with only probably a wimpy 25:1 or so.
It was the most powerful brake when tested circa '90 or so by Mt. Bike ragazine, surpassing even the WTB rollercam, which really tweaked the WTB folks at the time.
On the back of that same bike is an IRD Widget brake, a sidepull design that predates the V brake by almost a decade. It uses a toggle to vary its mechanical advantage and travel, so it doesn't require a special V brake style lever. I'm using a drop bar with a Modolo road lever and can get 1-finger lockups, and more importantly, way better modulation than V brakes so I don't lock up unless I intend to.
The old IRD made very cool stuff. They had a bike called the Stroker that was designed around I think it was 225mm length Bullseye cranks.
I believe Bigwheel has one, maybe he'll chime in about it.
 

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Yeah, I am almost 100% sure its not run by Rod and the gang outa selma (I think thats where they were from) anymore. They were the best components back in the day. I was riding outa Eugene Oregon in those days and IRD brakes with mathouser (sp?) pads were amazing...loud but amazing. One of the guys from the shop rode the frame with the uber long cranks..it was crazy. I would love to get ahold of some of the brakes/seatpost and especially the forks...mmmMMmmmm.....

Man....I miss the old days....epic rides/polo and hanging at Collins and my favourite shop Cycle-Bi (If I remember correctly)....slobbering all over the Yo Eddy and Merlin Ti bikes...fack...
 
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