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Retro Grouch
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Although I have a Camelpak I don't use it much; never on a road bike ride and on my mountain bike primarily on 4+ hour rides; I just don't like to have to maintain a camelpak. I have read some posts by younger riders that can't imagine why bike manufacturers even build water bottle cage bosses anymore into their bikes.

While were on the subject, how about bike packs? You know, the wedge pack that attaches under the seat. I have road for years without one, but by wife gave me a Surly wool jersey for Christmas and anything heavy in the rear pocket makes the jersey stretch out. So, now I've added a bike pack for my Co2 cartridges and tools. How about you?
 

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I really like my Camelback. I don't use water bottles anymore, and everything I want to take along (tools, inner tubes, camera, food, rain jacket and trousers) just fits into the Camelback as well. No bike packs, no jersey pockets full of rubbish, I love it.

I only put water in the Cb, though. It helps to limit the cleaning requirements. For really long rides, I may take a water bottle filled with my favourite: mocca-flavoured soy milk :)
 

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I just got back from my first ride without a camel back in about a year and it was great to have that weight off my back . I just have to get used to the mud on the mouthpiece of the bottles now .
 

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I also use a Camelback for the most part, but will use a bottle with an electrolyte/carbo drink for 3+ hr rides. Maintenance is easy since I only put water in the Camelback; I just do a quick rinse at the end of my ride, and place bladder in the freezer. When I am ready to ride, I rinse out again, and fill with filtered water. No bad taste, and haven't had any mold or nasty growth for over 2 years with this method. I currently don't have water bottle cages mounted on any of my mountain bikes.

As far as bike packs go, I have never used one, but they look intriguing. How much can you carry in one? My road bike is only used as a commuter, and with the heat here in Phoenix, panniers are the way to go for carrying any thing substantial. A pack just leaves me too hot and sweaty getting to work no matter how easy I take it.
 

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PSYCHOLUST
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I had a camelback for years and I loved it. Tools, tubes and lots of water for long hot rides.... I did get irritated with trying to keep it clean. Nothing worse than grabbing the camelback to head out and seeing those little black spots of mold in the hose. a 30 minute delay as I bleach the innerds clean.
I started using water boittles agian a couple oif years ago and after walking out with a flat, started using a seatbag with tube/C02/ multi tool ect. and have left the camelback hanging in the garage.
 

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Occasionally engaged…
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I'm a water bottle guy, but for really long rides I use a 1 liter Platypus bladder w/ hose in the center rear pocket of a strong lycra jersey. I don't mind stuff in pockets of jerseys that have robust lycra, but if they're saggy pockets I can't abide that. I want nothing around my waist or shoulders, so no packs for me. I've ridden unsupported century road rides on two large bottles, a 1 liter bladder, and a few power bars (when it was cool). I love wool jerseys, but only use them when I don't need to carry a bladder. For the life of me, I can't see how any singlespeeder who has to stand up to climb can stand to have a water pack swinging around on their back, let alone interfering with sweating and ventilation. But clearly, many who ride farther and faster than I do can deal with it...

Because I don't use a back or waist pack, I do use an under-the-seat tube and tool bag -- usually good for two 16g CO2 cartridges, two 35x700c tubes, and a multi-tool. I've probably break into the seat pack once a summer, but it's nice to have the peace of mind that comes with being prepared. For the local mtb x-c race series, I pull the bag off so my bike looks faster. For 100k and 100 mile races, it stays on.
 

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If I'm doing laps in a 24 hour race of approx 1 hour and it's cool weather where I won't need to hydrate much on course, I'll use an under seat pod for patches, tyre levers, clip pump to bottle mounts and take a 3/4 empty bottle on the frame. When I want to be quicker then the less I've got on my body the better.

For all other riding, the whole lot goes into a camelbak which takes a quart of water, pump, multi tool, chain links and joiners, tyre levers, patches, mobile, wallet, car keys, spare tube, a banana and some form of confectionery for a quick energy hit.
 

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This is the great dilemma in my life. I've use both. The convenience of the camel back (esp for multiple bikes) is hard to beat. For short races I've gone with water bottles. Endurance racing I've used the camelback. It's nice having the weight off the shoulders, but too much on the bike gives it a bit of a sluggish feel too. Ultimate setup is water bottles, tube and repair stuff in the jersey pockets. For cold weather rides, I always use the camelback for clothes storage.
 

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Camel Back Podium Bottles.

Cheep plastic imparts harmful things/flavors into water.

PF
 

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I use water bottles because I don't like the backpack around my shoulders business. I don't use a seatbag though. I wear a small mountainsmith lumbar pack with tools/food/phone and keys. I got so much junk in my trunk that I don't even feel the lumbar pack hangin off my booty.

I do bike really close to home and mostly 3 hours or less. I guess if i were going on an all day ride I would probably have to suck it up and wear my Camelbak.
 

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SSolo, on your left!
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Orkje said:
I really like my Camelback. I don't use water bottles anymore, and everything I want to take along (tools, inner tubes, camera, food, rain jacket and trousers) just fits into the Camelback as well. No bike packs, no jersey pockets full of rubbish, I love it...
X2, but I use my bottles for water only, the electrolyte stuff goes in my Camelbak...easy to rinse out and then store in the freezer between use. This keeps mold from growing in it. All my parts tools, clothes, camera, pump (no dang CO2 limited use and heavy...sell you mine it's in great condition!), etc. are in one easy spot...my Camelbak and it adds back protection if I crash.

On long rides and in hot weather I carry at least one (two in summer) bottles of water only on my bike frame cages.
 

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Soma water bottles (no plastic taste).
Jandd seat bag for tools and tube.
Camelbak used only for epic all day rides where two water bottles aren't enough - I don't like having anything on my back when the bike can carry it. (Which is why I don't understand the popularity of messenger bags for commuters when you could carry your stuff in a pannier on the bike).
 

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Camelbak = long rides/variable weather to carry food, layers, and occasionally beer.
Water bottles = relatively short rides.

Love the free feeling of not having a pack on my back.
 

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WNC Native
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Camelback at all times. I will add a bottle with hammer nutrition mix on longer rides.
Simple reason, We have horses on our trails and I rather not get sick from the parasites.

I use a larger Camelback most of the time, but will switch to one of the small ones for short races. Any tools or tubes are in my Camelbacks. That way I don't have to setup a tool bag for each bike, or switch stuff from one to the other.
 

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used to always wear a camelback. Nowadays it's a water bottle and wedge under the seat. Very liberating to have the weight lifted off my shoulders.
 

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I have red hair
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rides under 2 hrs = 1 bottle w/ water, 1 bottle w/ Hammer HEED, 1 Hammer Gel

rides over 2 hrs = 1 Dakine/Nalgene pack (70 oz), 1 bottle w/ HEED, 2+ Hammer Gel

The Dakine pack I use also holds all the essentials - tube, patch, cartridge, food, camera, etc. I prefer the Dakine pack over the Camelbak because of the bladder system, it has a detachment system so you can take the hose off easily to fill/empty and have found the storage compartments to be a lot more useful than on my previous Camelbak brand water packs. I also live and die by the Hammer Nutrition products - good stuff
 
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