Mendocino, CA - You'd be forgiven for thinking that there weren't any untouched, undiscovered stretches of Pacific coastline left in the United States. Forgiven but wrong. Just north of Mendocino, California, there lies a stretch of coastline that still enjoys obscurity and silence - a spectacular area known as the Great Lost Coast. It's an area so rugged that the iconic Highway 1 is forced to turn inland and skirt the region, leaving a stretch of wilderness accessed only by a few dirt roads and hiking trails.

It also happens to be perfect for mountain biking, with butter-smooth singletrack criscrossing the King Range mountains through giant redwood forests, and spectacular ocean vistas providing plenty of jawdropping moments.

The remote nature of the area is what has drawn Sacred Rides Mountain Bike Adventures - rated "#1 Mountain Bike Tour Operator on Earth" by National Geographic Adventure magazine - to the area. Working in partnership with local guides, they've developed an incredible 8-day itinerary that visits the best trails and attractions of the area, including some of the funky coastal towns that dot the area.

"This is one of the west's last remaining wild and remote places," says Mark Baeder, Sacred Rides' lead guide in the area. "It's mindblowingly beautiful and I'm looking forward to sharing our little secret with the rest of the mountain bike world."

The first Great Lost Coast Adventure gets underway on Aug. 18, 2012, with additional departures in September and summer 2013. For more information visit https://www.sacredrides.com/rides/california/lostcoast or call 1-888-423-7849.

About Sacred Rides
Ranked "#1 mountain bike tour operator on Earth" by National Geographic Adventure magazine, Sacred Rides offers small-group singletrack mountain bike adventures and skills camps in 10 destinations worldwide, with a focus on responsible tourism that makes direct, meaningful contributions to local communities. For over 16 years they have wowed mountain bikers around the world with incredible adventures in lands both exotic and domestic.

Source: Mike Brcic