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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys! Long time reader, first time poster.
BAsically, I was wondering about the housing for the cables (RB, F&B derailers) that run bare along my top tube. (Brodie Cyclone)
First, I don't understand why they would set the bike up with full housing, but then leave the cables bare along the top tube like that.
And secondly, should I not be concerned about contaminates getting into the housing from that point?
Thirdly, if so, What's the best/easiest way to seal up those cables and protect them from the elements?
Thanks, TheChief.
 

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Old man on a bike
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I'm not familiar with your bike but am a bit confused as you say the bike was set up with full housing runs, but then you contradict yourself by saying it's got an interrupted housing run. Or does the bike have cable housing guides that can work with either method? Interrupted housing runs indeed can allow more contaminates into the system; I'm a big fan of full housing runs. You can still install full housing runs even if you have guides dedicated to interrupted runs by bypassing them, modifying them or using housing guides that fit into your existing guides. As it took me a second, thought I'd mention that usually front and rear are referred to as F&R rather than F&B; assume RB is for rear brake?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply, although other than the lecture on my use of abbreviations, it doesn't really answer my question...Sorry for the confusion. Since I'm relatively new here, how about I just give you a link to a picture of the bike and you can see what I'm talking about? (click enlargement).
http://www.brodiebikes.com/2006/2006_bikes/cyclone.php#
As you can see, it's fully covered Except for the top tube.
1.Any ideas why they'd do this? (I just figured there's got to be a reasonable explanation).
2.What's the best/easiest way to cover-up and protect that bare area of cabling? Do I have to run all new housing top to bottom, (ie, T-B) ;)
 

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Usually do it to cut down weight is one reason I always hear. Doing the intermittent outer housing also alllows manufacturers to make sure the cabling bends are proper for the frame/suspension design, if that makes sense.

Running full-length outer housing is certainly ideal, but some frame designs make this impractical for any number of reasons.

I'm not familiar with your particular bike, but I don't see a reason you couldn't run full-length housing over the top tube at least. That being said, it's easier said than done. The cable housing guides on your frame (most likely) are not designed to run outer housing all the way through them - they taper at the end to a size such that just bare cable goes thru. You can either drill out the guides to widen them (I did that), or there are aftermarket bolt-on cable guides that attach to your existing ones which accomodate outer housing. Or you can just zip-tie the housing to your frame. All varying levels of "cleanliness" in terms of eye-candy.

Another option is to use Avid Flak Jackets - they have a mini outer-housing "straw" tube that fits over the exposed cable sections to prevent contaminants getting in. They work very well, and then you don't have to modify anything on your bike or cable routing.

Flak Jackets are probably your best bet for starting out... If you search the forums here for "Flak Jackets" or "full-length housing", you'll get a lot of good ideas on how-to (pics and tips). The Flak Jackets come in both a brake set and derailleur set packages - you'd need both ofcourse, but the packages together give you everything you need to do the entire bike (cables, housings, ferrules, crimps).

Happy hunting!

Cheers, Chris
 

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ChiefHugeNutz said:
Thanks for the reply, although other than the lecture on my use of abbreviations, it doesn't really answer my question...Sorry for the confusion. Since I'm relatively new here, how about I just give you a link to a picture of the bike and you can see what I'm talking about? (click enlargement).
http://www.brodiebikes.com/2006/2006_bikes/cyclone.php#
As you can see, it's fully covered Except for the top tube.
1.Any ideas why they'd do this? (I just figured there's got to be a reasonable explanation).
2.What's the best/easiest way to cover-up and protect that bare area of cabling? Do I have to run all new housing top to bottom, (ie, T-B) ;)
That was a lecture? I did answer your question, but that doesn't mean you asked the right question to get the answer you were looking for or comprehend it. :rolleyes: The photo isn't all that great in the link, but it does look like you have interrupted housing runs (not full housing) on the top tube. Why Brodie did that I couldn't tell you, did you try asking them? Many bikes come that way, and many bikes come with cable/housing guides only for interrupted runs.

Like Chris130 sez otherwise...or you could just try to see if you can get a cable liner like this http://www.bikeparts.com/search_results.asp?ID=BPC105249
 

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ChiefHugeNutz said:
... Since I'm relatively new here, how about I just give you a link to a picture of the bike and you can see what I'm talking about? (click enlargement).
http://www.brodiebikes.com/2006/2006_bikes/cyclone.php#
As you can see, it's fully covered Except for the top tube.
1.Any ideas why they'd do this? (I just figured there's got to be a reasonable explanation).
2.What's the best/easiest way to cover-up and protect that bare area of cabling? Do I have to run all new housing top to bottom, (ie, T-B) ;)
I see a bare run of RD cable on the seat stay, too. This is the "normal" way cable stops are setup. Using full length housing (especially for the derailleurs) is fairly rare on mid-high end production bike. It use to be that housing had a lot of compression so using less housing made for better performance. This is no longer the case but the tradition of using cable stops continues.
 

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another option is to get the xtr cable kit, the jackets are filled with special grease and the end caps are 2 part and fit tightly around the cables (unless you're submerging the bike I dont see how dirt or water can get in these. I've seen the kit on ebay for $14. the flak jackets only give you enough cable for 1 full length run per package so they get pretty expensive
 
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