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I'm picking up a Ripley AF tomorrow at a shop and wondering what I should look for. First, due to the supply shortages, I'll make sure the build kit matches up. Will check for any damage due to shipping (seems unlikely). Will put pedals on, have the tires, shock and fork, seat post, set. Then will take it out for a quick parking lot spin to make sure it feels right - testing the shifting, brakes, dropper.
Then will buy, take a picture of it without a spec of dirt, and take it to a nearby trail and break it in :)

Seems to cover it, but anything else you do when buying a new bike?

Oh yeah, I'll also take a pic of the serial # just incase the bike is ever stolen / lost.

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Confirm it's setup tubeless, figure out which sealant was used.

Set the seat height correctly. Adjust the cockpit .Write down your shock/fork psi. Write down the serial, immediately make a bikeindex account & save it to your profile.
 
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If you have the ability to buy a extra chain, do it.

When I purchased my HD, I picked up a chain, a few tubes, an extra tire and some pads. I'm not tubeless. I have all the parts for it, but never cared. Frame protection is optional.

At this point, there isn't much that will keep you from riding, and if something does happen, you'll be covered.
 

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Usually, for good shops, under non covid situation, all accessories you buy that day should have a small discount. Free water bottle with the shop name printed on it should be standard. The shop I worked at as a kid offered all these and a cage to go with it.

Now is a different time of course.
 

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Consider applying RideWrap or alternate frame protection before hitting the trails. As you stated, the bike will never look as pristine as it does today.

Also consider ordering replacement parts now: rotor, complete drivetrain (cassette, chain, chainring, rear der), brake pads, and tires. Lead times and just plain availability of these items is not what it used to be...

Edited to add: take a photo of your receipt with your phone while at the shop. Most warranty registrations (and claims) require proof-of-purchase.
 
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Yep, ask what they can do on accessories when buying a bike. I‘ve seen both ways this year, got a credit towards the store and some stuff thrown in pedals and bottle cages. Another shop, nothing, which surprised me being a return multiple bike purchase customer, and in the past they did offer 10% of purchase towards accessories. But, different days for them I guess, and they do offer free lifetime basic tuneup, so I guess that’s something. I’d ask the shop about that as well, if you need that.

enjoy that bike!
 

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If you know your preferred bar width you can have them trim it down. It comes with a 780mm bar, so a good place to start if you are on a large, but if you are on small or medium you could trim it down a little depending on your preference.
 

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As for setting up the suspension, a good place to start are manufacturers settings, which you can generally find on their website. You height is easy, but your weight is you and all your riding kit. Take these figures with you and have them set it up. Then get them to check the sag (with you on the bike) to make sure it's in the recommended range.
 

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damn, shops do all of this. I've always just done it myself.
In my experience some shops will sit with you when you pick up a bike and go over the entire setup. Other shops will hand you the bike and a baggie with some bits and pieces and show you the door.

Also my life mantra is "If you don't ask, you don't get". This applies to everything.
 

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I'm picking up a Ripley AF tomorrow at a shop and wondering what I should look for. First, due to the supply shortages, I'll make sure the build kit matches up. Will check for any damage due to shipping (seems unlikely). Will put pedals on, have the tires, shock and fork, seat post, set. Then will take it out for a quick parking lot spin to make sure it feels right - testing the shifting, brakes, dropper.
Then will buy, take a picture of it without a spec of dirt, and take it to a nearby trail and break it in :)

Seems to cover it, but anything else you do when buying a new bike?

Oh yeah, I'll also take a pic of the serial # just incase the bike is ever stolen / lost.

Admin edit: photo for front page feature
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Step 1: Check availability.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I like to take it home and show it my other bikes. Make it a little jealous, and make sure it knows it's not the only game in town.

That has always worked well for me.
I tried this but it's not going over well. My new bike feels fantastic, the infatuation is intense and I have a feeling the love will continue to grow. My old trail bike is feeling used and abused, and feels our days together are limited (they are). I was a little rough on her, but we had so many great memories and experiences together. It's always sad to get rid of something you've loved especially one that has been so much fun but I just need to end it quick and move on.

My road bike is depressed and hasn't been outside in months. She knows I'll eventually take her out (when the trails are closed) but she wants out.
 
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