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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm running a Stumpjumper Evo with Purgatory rear and Butcher front. I find the rear tire skittish when cornering and it has let me down several times. I know I'm part of the problem, but have lost confidence in the purgatory. My front butcher never loses traction.

has anyone run a Butcher in the rear?
 

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Butchers are great tires. I run them front/rear on my DH bike. I currently have a purgatory on the rear of my Enduro, I haven't had any issues with it but do find the butchers grip better when pushed hard.

I've just ordered a set of butchers in the grid casing to replace my stock control casing tries as I need a bit stiffer sidewall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I think I'll try it out. I wonder if it will make much difference in rolling resistance?
 

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I ran butchers front and rear for a bit. Lots of traction, rolling resistance you will not notice anything big from the purgatory (since I think it rolls slow). I liked the combo but cut a butcher in the rear and a purgatory before that. So I put a ardent EXO on the rear and butcher front. Very nice combo in my neck of the woods in colorado, where there is a ton of climbing. The ardent rolls better then both, but dual butchers.....just get the job done on the way down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm in Socal, so much climbing too. Trails are mostly hardpack or loose over hardpack. I've seen a few ardents as well as high rollers in the rear. The ardent seems to have good cornering knobs, how is the transition from straight line to corner?
 

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I ran butchers front and rear for a bit. Lots of traction, rolling resistance you will not notice anything big from the purgatory (since I think it rolls slow). I liked the combo but cut a butcher in the rear and a purgatory before that. So I put a ardent EXO on the rear and butcher front. Very nice combo in my neck of the woods in colorado, where there is a ton of climbing. The ardent rolls better then both, but dual butchers.....just get the job done on the way down.
had butcher/purg, bogged

running butcher/ardent now, better
 

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I wasn't really going to post at first, because it's not what you asked, but I thought this info might be relevant anyways. When leaned over, the Purg is a pretty capable tire. If you're breaking loose a lot, maybe it's your weight distribution on the bike. Too much weight over the front tire. You could try centering yourself on the bike more, raising your stem, or maybe even try a shorter stem.
 

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I'm running a Butcher front which I love with a Captain rear which I'm not a huge fan of. It climbs ok for me but braking is terrible, and it skids everywhere though it is predictable. Everyone seems to have different opinions on the Specialized rear tires though. I did see a rolling resistance comparison that they somehow calculated a numerical value for each tire, the Purgatory and Butcher were very close, the Captain slightly better, and Ground Control significantly better. No real harm in buying another Butcher to try out as you can run it on the front when you wear yours out if you hate it out back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks skyfink. I agree that I'm part of the problem. I might be leaning forward trying to cut an agressive line with the front, and not getting back enough to have the rear follow. Will try it out the next few rides. Also lose nothing running running two butchers as gatorgrizz says, I can keep for my future front if I don't like it.

I'm not sure whether the Butcher will climb well in the back, may try running it backwards?
 

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I wouldn't try running it backwards. It has ramped edges for better rolling resistance, and the braking edges form a slightly concave shape to scoop dirt for better braking. By flipping it, you'll be putting the ramped edges on the braking side, and the braking edges on the climbing side. What you gain in traction you will lose in rolling resistance and braking performance.
 

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I'm in Socal, so much climbing too. Trails are mostly hardpack or loose over hardpack. I've seen a few ardents as well as high rollers in the rear. The ardent seems to have good cornering knobs, how is the transition from straight line to corner?
I have not had a problem with it. Some think it feels scary and then list tires like the Hans damps and nevegal as better options so they are types that spend a lot of time in that transition knob area. If you ride the ardent the same style as you ride your butcher then you are in like flin. I so far have been really impressed with the butcher/ardent combo.
 
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