Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone out there know how I can get a set of bushings for a 1996 Dakar?

Also any input on the best way to maintain the bushings?

Thanks.
 

·
shaved yeti
Joined
·
430 Posts
sorry it took so long to post.

throughthewoods said:
Anyone out there know how I can get a set of bushings for a 1996 Dakar?

Also any input on the best way to maintain the bushings?

Thanks.
Jamis doesn't have a full complement of pivot bushings for previous to '98. The way they figure it, people shouldn't be riding bikes more than 5 years old. If you're suspension is that jacked up you oughta look at replacement.

To maintain the bushings the best way to dissemble, clean and lightly lube, and reassemble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
thanks; anyone out there have a set of bushings?; frame failure?

Thanks for the response. The frame seems to be in good shape. I'll take the bike apart and look it over.

Are there any common frame failure spots for the older Dakars?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
With a little reasearch, you may be able to work through a bearing supply shop to replace all of your bushings with sealed bearings. I saw a couple threads on the old General board about this process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
alternatives...

As others have said, you will have zero success in asking Jamis to supply you with those parts, they are often unable to supply parts for their most current framesets.

If you have a dealer in your town that has been selling Jamis bikes for a while, ask to see their spare parts box; you might luck out.

Failing that, there is nothing special about the bushings in that frame. A little on-line research will reveal many bushing/bearing suppliers that will have what you need. You will need to know the critical dimensions for the bushings you want to replace, namely the OD of the bushing, OD of the axle (ID of the bushing), length, and the flange thickness and diameter for the flanged bushings, and that will likely require removing them first and making careful measurements. Here's a few:

http://www.nationalprecision.com/nm7.htm
http://www.spacersandbushings.com/
http://igus.bdol.com/cbx.asp

I recently replaced the bushings in my '98 Dakar with polymer bushings from Igus, listed above. They were more than happy to sell me just two of each of what I needed, and if you call, you can speak to a very knowledgable salesperson who can tell you exactly which of their many styles of bushings would be perfect for your application.

As for problems with your frame to watch for, those older style Dakars have proven to be very durable, and if ridden within the limits of their intended usage, it should last a good while yet. Problems with the Dakar line began in '98, when they attempted to make a move away from the XC style of that frame, but failed to increase the strength in the right spots.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Great ideas! Thanks for sharing the wisdom

Thanks for the idea of going to a bearing mfg. and getting replacements that way.

Any advice on bushing materials to use or not use?

Rough costs?

Any assembly/dis-assembly issues?

Cheers

p.s.
And I'll check out the old posts as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Some ideas...

The bushings currently in your frame are likely to be a sintered bronze material on steel. That is what most of the on-line suppliers will have, and will work fine as a replacement. The other option is the Igus type of polymer material; Turner uses them with great success, but they also incorporate grease injection ports. Igus says lubrication is not needed. The polymers ones are a little fragile, requiring careful installation technique, but so far I like them. Very smooth immediately. I used the i-Glides, I forget which model (they are the only yellow ones) Cost is pretty minimal in either case; ~$1 to $4 per bushing.

You will likely need to come up with some kind of bolt, nut and washers arrangement to press the bushings in; do one side at a time, make sure it stays square. Removing the old ones could be the hardest part, as if they are the originals, they are probably pretty fixed in there. Once you start pulling the rear end apart, you will see what you'll have to do to get the old ones out. Be careful not to damage the inside of the bore of the frame. Look on the bushings when you get them out, they will probably have some numbers on that refer to their size. Measurements are probably metric.

The hangup will be if any of the axles are worn, such as the one in the main pivot, or the little top-hat like reducers thingys at the bottom of the swing link, where it connects to the seat stay. Good luck there.

Feel free to e-mail if you run into any snags; I've rebuilt a few of these.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
thanks alibi - looks like a project for an upcoming weekend

This isn't the first replacement set for this frame so hopefully the dis-assembly will go ok. Now that I think back - the replacement bushings didn't last half as long as the originals.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top