Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,805 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Can anyone with time on both bikes assist here? There are no Turner dealers near me but I've always liked what I've read about them so have them in consideration.

I'm looking for a bike on serious or heavy duty side of trail or light side of AM/Enduro. At age 55 I won't be doing crazy things but the Flux 12.8 inch bb height concerns me. My main home trail is sharp and often greased rock that glaciers weren't able to move. It's hard to explain but the rock gardens aren't baby skulls that I consider more predictable, and the place has a reputation for hurting gear and people.

Chain stay length concerns me with both bikes because it's longer than my v 1.5 Transition Covert but all I read gives the impression these bikes climb well.

Where I sit is wanting something playful like my Covert but but with some advantages of 29rs I've rented but don't really want to own. I don't think I need a 6 inch travel bike but I do use all the 140 mm travel of my current bike.

Finally, the trend toward wide 30 - 40 mm rims interests me. I don't plan on huge tires but that setup seems ideal for the greased sharp rock conditions at my favorite local riding spot.

Rider height 5'10 and shrinking, 150ish lbs if that makes a difference.

Thank you for any input here.

:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,247 Posts
Aloha,

I have not spent a lot of time on the Burner and the Flux to compare. However, I do have some insight. I demoed both those bikes back in Oct 2013 but only limited time on the Burner. I did extensive riding on the Flux in all kinds of conditions and I was comparing it to my older Horst-Link 5 Spot highly modified for rock garden, rooted trail riding I like we have here in Hawaii. I don't jump much but like to be able to clean stuff going up and down. I too had concern about the lower BB on the Flux. My Spot had a higher BB to start with and I added a 27.5 front to make the bike even more fun through the gardens and technical descents.

What I found was the 27.5 Flux works as well as my Spot at about a pound to 1.5 pound less and essentially 20 mm less travel. Yes, I do get pedal strikes from time to time with the Flux. So far (it's only been about 4 months now) it's not been an issue and it's rare. The new bike is better climbing and much smoother through the rooted, rocky stuff even with less travel. I do have a longer travel fork I plan to try out later. The plan for this is to raise the BB a little and be able to run the front end a bit plusher.

Think of the days when there was the 5 Spot and the RFX. The 5 Spot was (still is) a great trail bike lighter free-ride bike. The RFX was heavier duty trail bike, gusto-do-anything free ride bike.

Today I believe the Flux is a lighter weight trail bike and the Burner's the do it all, burlier, beefy gonzo bike. My suggestion is also give Dave Turner a shout. He's got some really good insight on this as I spent some time out there at the factory and picked his brain before choosing which bike(s) I wanted to demo.

Good luck with that, let us know which way you lean.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,805 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Aloha,

Today I believe the Flux is a lighter weight trail bike and the Burner's the do it all, burlier, beefy gonzo bike. My suggestion is also give Dave Turner a shout. He's got some really good insight on this as I spent some time out there at the factory and picked his brain before choosing which bike(s) I wanted to demo.

Good luck with that, let us know which way you lean.
Thank you for those insights.

We share the rocks and roots and general opinion but I can't help but knowing how I often use all the 140 mm TALAS offers and it over 80, 100, and 120 mm forks in same places. That said I'm pretty sure the bikes with 150-160 rear and similar forks are overkill.

Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,247 Posts
Thank you for those insights.

We share the rocks and roots and general opinion but I can't help but knowing how I often use all the 140 mm TALAS offers and it over 80, 100, and 120 mm forks in same places. That said I'm pretty sure the bikes with 150-160 rear and similar forks are overkill.

Thank you.
Well, that's an interesting statement. Just yesterday someone asked me while we were out on the trails "how much travel do you use on your bike?". My answer was it depends because it has a lot to do with what I am riding on any given day and how much I am attacking. Essentially it's like saying I have a 600 HP motor in my car. I don't use all of it very often but when I do need it, it's there. But do I need a 1000 HP motor? Well, again, that depends on what I intend to do with this car.

That being said, that was what my "pilgrimage" was all about when I went to visit Turner (and Southern California) in Oct. Simple question because I had been running my 5 Spot with a 27.5 front but couldn't fit a 27.5 in the rear - Can a "less travel" 27.5 bike have the same capabilities as my 5 Spot. Benefits hopefully being lighter weight and better suspension than my Horst Link.

You see, the 5 Spot was (still is) a great do anything (climb, descend, explore ride anything trail bike). However, one of the observations was while the bike benefited from the 27.5 front, the rear still gave the "shock" when it came in contact with the obstacles. I wanted to know if a 27.5 rear would improve the ride by that much (???).

In the end I can say with the DW suspension design plus the 27.5 front and rear the bike does climb better, descends as well and is a better overall bike (than my Spot). Bottom line, less travel, lighter bike better roll over obstacles and more traction (climbing for sure) but same capabilities as my Spot. Compromises? Slightly heavier wheels, a few pedal strikes and $6K all to answer the questions..............

I too can use all of my 140 mm on my Magura on my Spot. It just depends what I am riding and how I am riding it that day (what kind of group I am riding with for sure). By the way, I don't have different bikes for different days or kinds of riding. I like my one bike does it all kind of thing. Up, down, rocks, roots, smooth, stair steps, drop offs, bike paths, roads to access trails? It's all done with one bike. I don't race so it doesn't "time" doesn't matter. It's more of the "how many smiles" factor.

So hmmm. I believe the Flux at 120 mm is as capable as the Spot is at 140 mm. The Burner's certainly more capable but at a price of more weight of which do you think you'll ever "need" that extra travel? Tough call for sure. I wish you luck.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
193 Posts
The Burner truly is an amazing "do it all" bike, i have ridden it up technical stuff and today i rode DH with it and it never lets me down, 150mm pike up front is just wonderful and the weight really isnt all that bad, 13kg with a dropper.

All turner DWs will climb like a lighter bike so you might get both worlds here :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
754 Posts
I was in a similar boat to the OP when I bought my Flux 3.0.

My primary concern was the low BB on the Flux, versus the nimbleness of the Burner at lower speeds (ie... 'fun' factor on flowy trails). I was after the perfect companion for rocky, rooty trailriding. My resolution was to build a slightly tougher flux (34mm fork @140/130mm), larger casing tires, etc...

The end result was just what I was looking for. It's fast going up, fast going down and rad in between. Pedal strikes are seldom a concern due to the slightly altered geometry from a taller fork, even when riding the rockier junk in Moab.

At 150 lbs and 55 years of age, I'd go Flux in a heartbeat. You're going to love it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,805 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The Burner truly is an amazing "do it all" bike, i have ridden it up technical stuff and today i rode DH with it and it never lets me down, 150mm pike up front is just wonderful and the weight really isnt all that bad, 13kg with a dropper.

All turner DWs will climb like a lighter bike so you might get both worlds here :)
Hi,

What parts and wheels for it to be that light with a dropper?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
I'm thinking of getting a Flux but also concerned about the low BB height so my current plan would be to get a 130 fork (I will have to go through all the A/C numbers) and Burgtec bushings for the rear shock to raise it a bit. I'm still concerned that 13.0 - 13.1 might still be too low for my rocky conditions. Are all bikes designed for mythical smooth flowy trails?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
How can Burgtec bushings raise it? They can only lower it as they can and will rotate around the bolt (is it not today then tomorrow when things loosen up only a tiny bit) and thus always shorten the shock length. I read this somewhere else and to me that remark made common sense, but did not try and experience it myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
I used the Burgtec bushings to lower the BB on my converted SC 650B Nickel down about 1/4" to 3/8” and kick out the HA by a degree. This small change was a noticeable improvement in handling. I am assuming that by reversing the bushing mounting holes as shown in the Burgtec directions I could raise the BB a little and sharpen the front end up to compensate for a 130mm Rock Shox fork. A RS Revelation (32) has an AC of 519. The stock Flux design spec is based on a Fox 120 of 510 length, a difference of only 9mm that I hope the bushings could compensate for and bring me back to the spec geometry. Burgtec shows bushings for Turners in their cataloge. I have not ordered my Flux yet because I still need to convince myself that I can get it to work in the tight rocky and rooty trails of New England. I think I can live with the long wheelbase and chainstays but the too low BB has me concerned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Lowering the BB works fine (I use them for that) as even when the bushing rotates around its bolt, it will find the lowest point (on the bottom pivot). That is a stable situation. In contrast it will only remain in its highest position if the bolt is torqued down sufficiently and prevents the bushing from rotating down. It depends upon the construction of the pivot whether it allows narrowing down the gap until the bushing is snugly torqued.
As I wrote I don't know from experience whether this happens in reality, but in my oinion it is a risk.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top