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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This isn't a terrible thing, but more of a curiousity...

I was an avid biker until my first child was born. At the time of his birth I was riding 3K+ miles per year and I weighed 165 lbs (I'm 6'1" tall). In the 8 years after his birth, before I made the time to ride again, I'd gained ten pounds. Then I started riding again 3 years ago and immediately (within 2 months) gained ten more pounds of muscle and I think transfered maybe 3-5 lbs of the flab I'd gained earlier into muscle as well. (I'm still a little soft on the edges.) I'm now 38 and 185 lbs. I ride about 400 miles a year now. It's not just my legs that are growing. My arms are getting bigger and my stomach is getting more definition, but it's still far from a six pack.

My training typically consists of two rides a week. One on my SS bike of 6-10 miles of tight trails that require a lot of acceleration and another ride of 17-23 miles that is mostly dirt roads with as many hills as I can find (which aren't much in S. MI). The pace on the SS is trail limited to about an average 10 mph and the pace on the dirt roads is averaging 14-15 mph. My goal is to work my way up to the average 16-17 mph dirt road pace I had before quiting 11 years ago.

I was hoping once I started riding again I'd be back to my 165 lb weight, But I'm going the opposite direction. :madman: I'm curious if it is my training method or just old age that is causing me to bulk up. What are your opinions on the weight gain? Is there something I can do to maximise my two weekly rides to get up to my old average speed?

The ultimate goal here is ride the 28 mile Ore to Shore race in under 2 hours. (Harder trails slow my race pace from my dirt road average.)
 

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A quick and dirty rule of thumb is calories in v. calories out. If you're taking in more "fuel" than your body can burn in any given day, it is stored. If you decrease your caloric intake by 10-20% along with your riding (caloric expenditure) you should start seeing a decrease in weight. My wife (expert level/ultra racer) did just this and dropped 18 lbs, which has made her faster and able to ride more (intensity, technically challenging trails, ascents, etc.) than she used to.
J
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Are you suggesting dieting to reduce muscle mass?

While I've gained twenty pounds most of it is going into muscle mass making my legs, arms, shoulders bigger than they ever were before. I do still have some little "love handles" I could stand to get rid of but for the most part the weight gain has been muscle that makes me no longer look like the bean pole I was.
 

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Keep in mind your body fat percentage will naturally want to increase as you age, and your metabolism will naturally slow a bit as well. This is especially true if you had a long time period where you didn't ride.

I am in a similar situation in terms of putting on muscle now days compared to when I was a little younger--but I have been trying to do so. Most of my life I couldn't gain weight (muscle or fat) no matter how hard I tried. These days I've been working out and for the first time have been able to put on some more significant muscle mass. I say that in a relative manner, because I've added about 8 pounds of muscle at this point. That is a lot for me, now weighing in at about 146. Some people can put on 8 lbs of muscle mass with ease. I used to work out much harder and would be lucky to gain any weight.

Frankly, if you are in fact gaining muscle mass I just wouldn't worry about it. Unless you are into serious racing, just be happy with the better overall fitness. You might not be quite a fast over a two hour course. But who cares? (Start calling yourself a sprinter.)
 

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If you're trying to lose weight it's a matter of consumed fuel v expended fuel. No offense intended, but are you sure it's muscle-mass you've gained, or have you simply "firmed" or "toned" up from your cycling. Your first post states you rode 3k miles per year (higher volume) and you weighed less. Now you're riding 400 miles per year and weigh more. While your diet (consumed fuel) may be the same, your riding volume has decreased so you're not expending as much as you take in.
Again, please don't take offense...these are just my thoughts after reading your post(s). I'm no expert and never claim to be. These are just observations over years of riding. I live in a very active neighborhood and see people running and cycling on a daily basis with no significant change to their body shape, other than being more toned and tan.
J
 

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Although you probably won't beat too many skinny little guys up steep climbs,185 for someone 6'1" might be heavy for a bike racer it isn't too bad for general health (thinking on the positive side ;) )

Like others have said, if you want to get your weight down, balance your caloric intake with increased calories out and you will loose weight. It takes a lot of discipline I know all too well. I have a broad shoulder, barrel chest kind of build and even when I was racing full time, at 6' I weighed in the mid to low 170s. To maintain even that weight took a lot of miles and dietary discipline.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
j-rocket said:
If you're trying to lose weight it's a matter of consumed fuel v expended fuel. No offense intended, but are you sure it's muscle-mass you've gained, or have you simply "firmed" or "toned" up from your cycling. Your first post states you rode 3k miles per year (higher volume) and you weighed less. Now you're riding 400 miles per year and weigh more. While your diet (consumed fuel) may be the same, your riding volume has decreased so you're not expending as much as you take in.
Again, please don't take offense...these are just my thoughts after reading your post(s). I'm no expert and never claim to be. These are just observations over years of riding. I live in a very active neighborhood and see people running and cycling on a daily basis with no significant change to their body shape, other than being more toned and tan.
J
No offense taken... You speak the truth. I guess technically you are correct, without a correct evaluation don't know how much fat has been transformed into muscle. I can say, without a doubt, I look and feel better so whatever has happened I'm happy.

I have cut down the amount of intake. Obviously, not enough as I gained 10 lbs in my off years.

Now if only I could get that tan. Unfortunately, my northern European heritage causes me to barely cast a shadow.:D

Gatorback said:
SNIP

You might not be quite a fast over a two hour course. But who cares? (Start calling yourself a sprinter.)
LOL, I'll just reclassify myself to fit my reality.:thumbsup:
 

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Green_Canoe said:
Now if only I could get that tan. Unfortunately, my northern European heritage causes me to barely cast a shadow.:D
My wife is the same. Not too long ago she shopped for a new 2-piece swim suit. The sales girl commented on how great the purple suit looked on her and in the same breath said "now all you need is a tan!". My wife laughed. Even as an avid cyclist she barely has a shadow of a tan line on her legs and arms.
Good luck with your goals, G_C. Your perseverance and attitude toward fitness and being active will go a long way with your children.
J
 

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more mileage would get you closer to your goal of course...

that age thing is a bummer though. I work out much much harder & longer than I did 15 years ago but I definitely weigh more. I'd like to claim its all muscle but it is not. :( At this rate I'd better be able to schedule 4 hours a day on the bike in another 10 years to prevent reaching maximum density!

OTOH my cardiac fitness is great, and that is what counts, in the big life picture. Or what i say to console myself :D
 

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I know that this is a little off topic, but why not do the 48 mile instead of the 28? The longer course is just more 2 track with more hills. Besides, you are traveling from Southern Michigan to Marquette, about a 6 to 8 hr drive why not make it worth it (in satisfaction from riding the long race)?
No matter what you do.. Good luck! and be sure to have plenty of Q tips, you will find dust in your ears and nose for over a week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
TBoneIH said:
I know that this is a little off topic, but why not do the 48 mile instead of the 28? The longer course is just more 2 track with more hills. Besides, you are traveling from Southern Michigan to Marquette, about a 6 to 8 hr drive why not make it worth it (in satisfaction from riding the long race)?
No matter what you do.. Good luck! and be sure to have plenty of Q tips, you will find dust in your ears and nose for over a week.
I keep telling myself this will be the last year riding the 28 miler. Problem is I'm doing with a bunch of college friends and they don't train hard enough to do the 48 miler. I know I have to strike out on my own, maybe next year... There is one fellow in our group that is a better rider than I but he wasn't able to make the race last year or this year. So I say next year I'm either riding the 28 miles on my SS or doing the 48 miler.;)

The travel isn't too bad in that we originally from N. MI and are usually staging our travel from the in-laws in Onaway, friends in Petoskey, or my folks summer place in Soo Canada and staying at some more friends in Gladstone before and after the race. The only bummer is the long trip back home, which we usually do in a straight shot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Impy said:
more mileage would get you closer to your goal of course...
I remember the days when I'd get home from work and go ride for an hour, eat dinner, and go fishing until dark. Note to the kids here: Marriage and kids are great but it really cuts into the recreation time.:D

that age thing is a bummer though. I work out much much harder & longer than I did 15 years ago but I definitely weigh more. I'd like to claim its all muscle but it is not. :( At this rate I'd better be able to schedule 4 hours a day on the bike in another 10 years to prevent reaching maximum density!

OTOH my cardiac fitness is great, and that is what counts, in the big life picture. Or what i say to console myself :D
Looking at the majority of the folks I see at the swim parks I've got a long way to go before reaching critical mass. I keep telling myself my massive, cut legs make up for any other inadequecies I may have.:D
 
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