Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

On building a bike I have 2 questions.

1. Is it more economical to build a bike and choose each component separately rather than buying a bike. If there's a 2k Trek for example and I choose to build a bike using 2k worth of components I'll be getting a far superior bike right?

2. When building the bike how do you put the percentage in parts. (Just for the bike, I'm not including any accessories)

I'm just using random numbers but for example
Frame: 35 percent of total
Tires: 8 percent
etc

Thanks,
Ham :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,146 Posts
i've never priced out parts to build a complete bike, but i'm not sure you will save any money by doing it separate. Those manufacturers use economies of scale to bring prices down to very competitive levels and i doubt you will be able to match them spec for spec and get a much better deal; maybe a little but that may not be worth it.

Building your own WILL be worth it if you know your way around what parts you want specifically, because when you buy a trek, not all parts will make you happy. When you build your own, you will be happy with each and every part you get.

In the end if you're not familiar with the specs and levels and performance of each part, i dont suggest you try to build a bike from the ground up for money savings; do it if you're willing to spend just as much as or more to get the parts you want.

keep in mind you won't get the warranty that trek offers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Typically you will spend more building one from scratch, than buying a complete bike.
You can save some money buying used parts on ebay, but I found that to be a hastle, and people just plain pay to much for used parts.
I just completed a build and ended up purchasing most of my parts new, but on sale through various sites.
I'd suggest selecting a frame that you like, search for the best deal, then work from there.
My recent build, the frame was about 40% of the cost.
The fork is the second most expensive component, then wheels, brakes ,crank, bar, etc.
 

·
Is dang happy!
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
You will pay twice as much building from the ground up unless you can get killer deals everything. By killer deals I mean less than cost, the wheels and fork will often sell for as much as a complete bike in the shops around here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,762 Posts
"1. Is it more economical to build a bike and choose each component separately rather than buying a bike. If there's a 2k Trek for example and I choose to build a bike using 2k worth of components I'll be getting a far superior bike right? "

No not at all. It is ALWAYS more expensive to build a bike from frame up than it is to buy a complete bike. This is assuming new parts, no flea bay second hand junk, and also assuming current model year parts. But even with last years model stuff, you still can't touch a comparably speced complete bike for price. The reason being is that bike manufacturers buy in bulk, and usually directly from the component manufacturers. So they get HUGE discounts on components that even the online retailers don't get. Do a spec out sometime and see for yourself. Take the spec of that 2k Trek and price out the exact same components online as a build kit. You'll likely find that you'll end up with 2k+ just in components for the exact same spec! And you haven't even speced the frame yet. The key here is to compare apples to apples. When you compare a comparable frame (quality wise) and then the same parts spec you will almost never be able to build a bike cheaper than a complete bike unless you seriously downgrade the frame or the components.

"2. When building the bike how do you put the percentage in parts. (Just for the bike, I'm not including any accessories)"

There's no way to do this because what you think is important some one else won't. And people tend to spend more on things that they think are more important. There isn't even an "average" between the frame and component cost. It's different for each build. As an example a Full Suspension build I am considering, the frame is going to be right at 50% of the cost of the build, frame: $2200, components" $2350. I'm working on a Touring Bike build currently that the frame is only 25% of the build cost, frame: $400, components: $1200. I've got a hard tail that I built up a couple of years ago that the frame wasn't even 10% of the build. I got the frame from a shop that had it hanging around. It was a warranty replacement that the customer decided he didn't want, he went for a new FS bike, rather than the hardtail replacement frame so they were stuck with it. I got it for $80! I then proceeded to hang $1400 worth of components on it. That is the ONLY time I've ever built a bike from the ground up with new current year frame and parts that was cheaper than the complete bike. The complete bike in question retailed for $1500 so it wasn't cheaper by much, but it was cheaper! :D

Anyway, the bottom line is. Building a ground up bike is very rarely cheaper than than buying a complete bike. If it is, the bike is usually inferior as far as component level goes. But it is vastly more rewarding! You get experience in doing things yourself, derailleur setup, installation of the components etc. And there is a great deal of satisfaction in knowing you did it yourself. So if you are looking to get a better bike cheaper than a comparable complete bike by building your own , forget it. Ain't likely to happen. The idea behind a frame up build isn't to save money, it's to get a bike that is speced exactly the way you want it, no compromises. That's what makes the bike superior to a complete bike, it's your idea of what the bike should be, not someone elses.

You can certainly build a bike for 2k easliy. But it won't be comparable or superiour to a complete bike at 2k.

Good Dirt
 

·
MTBR Member
Joined
·
3,008 Posts
Depends on how soon you want your bike. It's gonna take some time to find good deals on the parts you want.

Generally, the big manufacturer will win out. But, if you know what you want and want to hand pick your parts, go for it. Gonna need to figure in some money for tools too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
851 Posts
Alot of the advice assumes you only purchase new parts. Fork, wheels, and frame can be purchased used for a huge savings. You can always send the suspension into push to be freshened up. I built my Yeti 575 for $1500 and it not only rocks but it has a pretty sweet build sheet.
 

·
Can't feel my legs
Joined
·
852 Posts
agabriel said:
Alot of the advice assumes you only purchase new parts. Fork, wheels, and frame can be purchased used for a huge savings. You can always send the suspension into push to be freshened up. I built my Yeti 575 for $1500 and it not only rocks but it has a pretty sweet build sheet.
On the same note, used bikes can be purchased for a huge savings over a bike built from used parts.
There are many benifits to building a bike, but price is not one of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
342 Posts
louisssss said:
keep in mind you won't get the warranty that trek offers
How important is the warranty? How many of you have had to use it? I've owned 10+ mtb's over the years and never had a warranty issue. That being said, if you know what your looking for you can build up a bike for cheap buying off ebay. Also check out CRC they usually have the best prices on shimano.
 

·
Pretty in Pink
Joined
·
628 Posts
Noone has mentioned yet that tools to build up a bike need to be figured into your first bike build. There are some specialty tools that you simply cant do without, and tools are pricey. Granted its nice to have the tools for the job anyway, you will never have to worry about someone else having to do your work for you, and you will save a lot of time and money on not having to take your bike in to the shop for them to work on it.

I think its worth it to build your own bikes, and it is very rewarding riding around on a bike that you wrenched yourself. But as far as cost goes, I would say its similar unless you find amazing deals on things, which right now you might be able to do if you shop around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,878 Posts
if you really do some bargain hunting and buy used parts you might be able to build a bike up for less than the cost of a new bike. if you think you're going to buy new parts and build up a bike that way then you're going to end up spending a lot of $$$$. buying a complete bike is the way to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
here is my 2k bike and i would def say it is superior to a 2k manufacturers bike with ease. yes i got a sh!t load of discounted parts but it is diffidently possible. took me about 4 months to complete and the only tools i had to buy where a chain wip witch i made my self and bearing tool for crank every thing else you can do with basic mechanics tools.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for all the advice, even though it makes it more confusing as well :p
I am taking all this information into account, thanks for every post.

Do you think it's very difficult to build a bike, I've heard that from several people?
And nobody has bike builds, I'm surprised? I know when building a computer people have builds that they show off showing all the components for a computer. The goal obviously isn't to make the most expensive computer, but to make the best computer possible in the price range, and to confirm that everything's good. I understand that everyone has different goals as Squash said but aren't there any top rated builds that people can use as a standing point to assemble?


and nice bike Moto

Thanks guys
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,146 Posts
building a computer isn't the same as a bike. Similar, but with building a computer you can often get high end parts and assemble them together than buying a high end computer. The same probably can be had with the very high end bikes that are $5000+, which would be similar to a $2000 computer.

With lower cost computers such as <$500, its very hard to build your own that can beat out those from Dell and HP. The same goes for bikes that i'd guess are from $500-$5000.

Again, there is more much testing from computers about which parts perform the best. With bike parts there is no comparison tests between which derailleur shifts faster or which crank is more efficient etc. Its the opposite with computers, we know exactly which CPU performs which tasks better @ power consumption.

I guess if you're really set on building a bike start with a good name brand frame thats rather lightweight (1600g or less) and work from there. The next part would be to get a good fork that works with your budget. then wheels would be my next priority. Then brakes, then drivetrain then bar/stem/post
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,146 Posts
motoxkfx123 said:
here is my 2k bike and i would def say it is superior to a 2k manufacturers bike with ease. yes i got a sh!t load of discounted parts but it is diffidently possible. took me about 4 months to complete and the only tools i had to buy where a chain wip witch i made my self and bearing tool for crank every thing else you can do with basic mechanics tools.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket
can we get a complete spec list + prices so we know what u got for $2000?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'm also using this advice on buying a whole bike from a company as well.

thanks for the advice, interesting suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,146 Posts
hamshank said:
I'm also using this advice on buying a whole bike from a company as well.

thanks for the advice, interesting suggestions.
i see, forget that percentage thing in your OP.

if you're buying as a whole, post the bikes you're looking into and your budget. we'll tell you whats good and bad about those bikes
 
1 - 20 of 54 Posts
Top