Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After researching, I've found that I can shave over 900 grams, over 2lbs, on race day by replacing my tank ass Bontrager Big Earl wheels with Easton Havocs and going with Super Tacky Minion front and High Roller rear. I'm assuming I'm going to get a bike that's easier to throw around the corners and a more lively suspension. Anyone else bounce back and forth between a heavy and light wheelset? Is it a night and day difference? I've never upgraded to a nice wheelset before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,445 Posts
900g will be an enormous difference. The bike will pedal and accelerate way better, it will hold speed better, suspension will activate better, it will pop and jump way better. But there are a few conditionals.

First of all, how new are your bontrager big earls? If they're newer then 2009, then you probably won't be shaving 900 grams off the wheelset, and you'll be loosing that mostly in tires. If they're older big earls, then pretty much any wheelset you get will be miles of smiles better.

Newer bontrager big earls, for all of their faults, are definitely not tanks. They use 2spoke cross on a 530g rim. The rim already dings like cheese, and I haven't encountered many rims that weight (or lighter) that don't also ding easily. (I'm on my 6th rim within a year - and my builds are all good enough that even when I fold the rim it doesn't go out of true). The hubs are fairly light re-branded dt-swiss hubs, so sealed bearings and star ratchet engagement. You could shave a bit of weight on the wheelset, but chances are, if your wheels are 2009 or newer, you're loosing weight on the tires. You could reasonably loose about 300g on the wheelset and still have a workable race wheelset, but that would be a very light wheelset and a "for race run only" setup.

If you're loosing most of that weight from tires (which it sounds like you are), knowing your tire setup becomes an important variable. Are you considering singleply tires? 2.35? or are you moving from some tank tire to a dual ply minion/highroller combo? If your maxxis tires weigh less then 1100g, chances are you're not running dual ply, and if you're racing beginner, that shouldn't be a probably, but unless you're really really really smooth, anything above sport and you'll probably be getting pinch flats the whole way down.

Hope that helps. Let us know whether you're running pre 2009 big earls and what your tire choices are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for your input. My wheels are from 06'. I got them when I worked at a Trek shop on closeout for $100 or so for the set. For tires, they're the 2.7 DHF Minion dual-ply, and 2.5 DHR Minion dual. Last year was my 3rd year riding downhill, first year on an 8" travel bike, first year racing. I only got to do a couple races and sucked, but I had a blast and want to take it more seriously this year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
ajdemo76 said:
After researching, I've found that I can shave over 900 grams, over 2lbs, on race day by replacing my tank ass Bontrager Big Earl wheels with Easton Havocs and going with Super Tacky Minion front and High Roller rear. I'm assuming I'm going to get a bike that's easier to throw around the corners and a more lively suspension. Anyone else bounce back and forth between a heavy and light wheelset? Is it a night and day difference? I've never upgraded to a nice wheelset before.
Get yourself some American Classic Hubs (150mm x 12) or (135 x 10) and a American Classic 20mm front hub laced to some Stans Flow rims. Super light at 1675grams and has lasted two seasons for me riding them all year, not just races. Add an aluminum or ti axle to them in the rear helps even more.

Want to step it up, put some Gatorbrakes ti 203mm rotors to shed even more....careful, this weight weenie stuff is addictive. That's why they've dedicated a forum to it! I should have my Intense 951 in the 34lbs range this year. Big savings is coming from a Rockshox Vivid Air as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,887 Posts
DTswiss EX1750.

1750 grams. Strong enough to race on. Little spendy at around a grand for the set but light weight never was cheap.
 

·
Glad to Be Alive
Joined
·
43,006 Posts
eride1 said:
i think its gonna be more mental then anything. 900grams on a wheelset is a lot.
more mental??? hardly not....2 pounds makes a lot of difference in rolling weight. Bike just feels easier to pedal...kinda of like you are on a slight downhill....it feels that much different.

If it was me I would switch rims and tires out in a heart beat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
his dudeness said:
DTswiss EX1750.

1750 grams. Strong enough to race on. Little spendy at around a grand for the set but light weight never was cheap.
Without looking again I think the Havoc's are about the same weight. I have a hookup through Easton so I'll go that route. If I could get the same deal through DT, I'd consider those as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Race wheels can turn a good bike into a great one. Personally my race wheels are notubes flow rims, dt swiss revolution spokes on saint hubs. Certainly not a bombproof wheel, but 1700 grams, stiff, and awesome.

When building race only wheels, I tend to run as light of a rim as I can get away with (read, without cracking/exploding without notice) with pretty high spoke tension, using a pretty "soft" spoke.

The thinking behind this is running what ends up being a soft rim/spoke combo so you don't flat as often, but high spoke tension so the wheels are laterally stiff. I would not recommend building wheels in this manner if you plan on using them on a daily basis, but for race only this setup is dynamite.

Face it, when you're letting it hang all the way out, and pushing it hard flat spotting the bajesus out of a rim beats the heck out of pinch flatting and loosing all of the air in your tires in half a second.

I'm from the camp of running disposable rims over getting flat tires.

Matt

Note. My everyday rims are 721's, supercomps, on hopes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
grnbkr said:
Race wheels can turn a good bike into a great one. Personally my race wheels are notubes flow rims, dt swiss revolution spokes on saint hubs. Certainly not a bombproof wheel, but 1700 grams, stiff, and awesome.

When building race only wheels, I tend to run as light of a rim as I can get away with (read, without cracking/exploding without notice) with pretty high spoke tension, using a pretty "soft" spoke.

The thinking behind this is running what ends up being a soft rim/spoke combo so you don't flat as often, but high spoke tension so the wheels are laterally stiff. I would not recommend building wheels in this manner if you plan on using them on a daily basis, but for race only this setup is dynamite.

Face it, when you're letting it hang all the way out, and pushing it hard flat spotting the bajesus out of a rim beats the heck out of pinch flatting and loosing all of the air in your tires in half a second.

I'm from the camp of running disposable rims over getting flat tires.

Matt

Note. My everyday rims are 721's, supercomps, on hopes
Do you run a compact cassette as well? I hear ya on the lightest you can get away with. I thought about even doing Easton's Haven wheelset but I think it's only a 100 gram difference between them and the Havoc while losing some rim width and durability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
I usually find myself running half xtr cassettes as they get too worn for xc racing. It ends up being a 6 speed with a 11-21 spread.

On a side note I have always preferred to build my own wheels, it allows you to find replacement spokes, nipples, and have a stockpile of rims in case you blow one up. Also I find that the wheels last longer, and you can get more wheel for your money. Factory built wheelsets have tons of proprietary components, and "innovative" building techniques. In downhill racing, where roasting a wheelset is one missed line away being able to have spokes, and an extra rim at the car is godsend.


Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
grnbkr said:
I usually find myself running half xtr cassettes as they get too worn for xc racing. It ends up being a 6 speed with a 11-21 spread.

On a side note I have always preferred to build my own wheels, it allows you to find replacement spokes, nipples, and have a stockpile of rims in case you blow one up. Also I find that the wheels last longer, and you can get more wheel for your money. Factory built wheelsets have tons of proprietary components, and "innovative" building techniques. In downhill racing, where roasting a wheelset is one missed line away being able to have spokes, and an extra rim at the car is godsend.

Matt
I looked around and found that Hope makes a light hub that's pretty cheap on chainreactioncycles.com. Saints are fairly cheap as well. I also have access to discounts on Sun/Ringle rims. I've only had their Single Track rims on my dirt jumper but liked them. I've heard the Rhyno Lites are a good one as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Alright, I think I've got it figured out....

Current beater wheelset minus rotors and cassette:
Bontrager Big Earl wheels
Minion 2.7 dual ply front
Minion 2.5 dual ply rear
12.50 lbs

Race build wheelset minus rotors and cassette:
Hope Pro 2 hubs
Sun Rhyno Lite XL rims
DT Swiss Champion spokes
Minion Super Tacky 2.5 front
High Roller 3C 2.5 rear
9.64 lbs

With the addition of a compact cassette, swapping old Codes for Hayes Primes and upgrading my old Easton Flatboys, I should be able to pull 4lbs off this thing, 3 in the wheels alone. Doing the build myself will cost me just over $300. Opinions? I'm wondering if I'm missing something and could do better for the money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
ajdemo76 said:
Alright, I think I've got it figured out....

Current beater wheelset minus rotors and cassette:
Bontrager Big Earl wheels
Minion 2.7 dual ply front
Minion 2.5 dual ply rear
12.50 lbs

Race build wheelset minus rotors and cassette:
Hope Pro 2 hubs
Sun Rhyno Lite XL rims
DT Swiss Champion spokes
Minion Super Tacky 2.5 front
High Roller 3C 2.5 rear
9.64 lbs

With the addition of a compact cassette, swapping old Codes for Hayes Primes and upgrading my old Easton Flatboys, I should be able to pull 4lbs off this thing, 3 in the wheels alone. Doing the build myself will cost me just over $300. Opinions? I'm wondering if I'm missing something and could do better for the money.
Go with a butted spoke, a DT Comp will be lighter, and likely last longer.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top