Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 64 Posts

·
Hueston Woods Trail Crew
Joined
·
1,844 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I promised to build this bike for someone and send him photos of the process.
I hope to get to get it finshed and tested this weekend. Busy week ahead.

Step one-get the nicest frame you can afford. This is a good one. Titanium/Carbon/Exogrid Titus Motolite with 4"/5" travel, Fox RP23. Any decent frame will do (if it fits you).

Step two-assemble the components you want (or have on hand, or can afford). I left out a couple things out of the photo, so no need to remind me.

Step three-got tools? Torque wrench is important. Set up bike stand outside in sunlight. I think mt. bikes are better built in the fresh air where they will thrive. Also better for photos.

Step Four-Invite a few friends, turn up the muzak.

Stay tuned.
 

Attachments

·
Freshly Fujified
Joined
·
8,199 Posts
Nice build spec!

That's gonna be one hell of a bike. Your friend is a very lucky person!

Bob
 

·
Hueston Woods Trail Crew
Joined
·
1,844 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
faced and chased

Anodized or painted frames often need to have their headtube faced, and bottom bracket shell faced and chased. Not so much on unpainted ti frames. Many times this is already done by the factory or builder.
Same with disc brake mounts front and rear.

Oh, and before you forget, weigh the unbuilt frame. Many people will ask you the weight of the naked frame, as well as the finished bike. That way they can figure their own build's projected weight if they are considering a similar frame.

This one weighs 5.83 lb. Sorry, the digital scale turned off before I snapped the photo.
Under 6 pounds is good for a 5" travel full suspension frame.
YMMV.
 

Attachments

·
Hueston Woods Trail Crew
Joined
·
1,844 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Lube, insert and mount

Sounds kinda sexy, but it's not.
Lightly grease the seatpost (not if it's carbon), insert into seat tube, tighten seatpost collar, and mount on stand.
Good idea to keep a finished bike nearby for reference,inspriation, or cannibalization if you are swapping parts.

Lube and carefully thread the bottom bracket after reading and rereading the instructions. Better to have the right spacers in place the first time. Bikes have different bottom bracket shell widths, usually 68mm or 73mm. It's good to know your bike's specifics.
If you really want to avoid squeeks in future, add some plumber's teflon tape. It's available at any hardwar store.
Take much care not to crossthread.
Use Ti prep in place of grease on ti frames. Gets all over your hands and clothes (and camera and keyboard) if you're not careful.
Please hand tighten to start. It should go in easily. Finish with the correct tool for your particular bottom bracket per instructions included.
 

Attachments

·
Hueston Woods Trail Crew
Joined
·
1,844 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Guess which headset

Correct. You must use the obligatory Chris King No-Threadset. Choose your favorite color (pink??) Even your girlfriend knows what a Chris King is. Makes any bike a custom-could even double the value of some rigs. But be careful. If you spent more than $300 on your headset, stem and carbon bars, you better be able to handle your bike. Otherwise you might get the dreaded poser label.
Actually, there are numerous excellent headsets available these days. Sealed bearing types are readily available and recommended. Cane Creek, FSA, RaceFace are all topnotch But if you want to add color, Chris King has the market cornered.
Ti prep on ti frames first. I like to carefully line up the KING letters. If you're more casual, skip this step. People can still see the logo from a distance.
If you don't have Chris King adapters do not continue. Take it to your freindly neighborhood bike shop (along with a 6-pack) and have them do it, along with setting the crown race (adapter also required)

NB. Insert the fork, but make sure it doesn't drop to the ground.
Measure 3 or 4 times with stem and spacers in place. Most of now allow for extra spacers so we can determine stem placement over time. Or if we swap the fork to our next frame, it's good to have some leeway.
 

Attachments

·
Hueston Woods Trail Crew
Joined
·
1,844 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Break's over-cut steerer

Remember-cut twice, measure once. Or is it measure twice, cut once. More than one builder has forgotten the stem when he marked his steerer and cried himself to sleep. Use a hacksaw, some kind of guide, and cutting oil if you have it. Pipecutter can be used instead.

File the cut steerer to smooth the edges. If you have a star nut setter, hammer in the starnut, being careful to go in straight. I have another starnut setter that makes sure you're straight, but it's hiding from me. In a pinch a bolt and hammer will do the job.

Blow off the filings and reinsert fork, headset top, spacers and stem. Sealed bearings require no grease. Ball bearing race takes a good dollop of grease.
No carbon spacers? Too bad. Better luck next time. We would also have accepted Chris King spacers.

Make sure there's a 2-3mm gap above the steerer tube and beneath top of the stem so you can tighten the top cap properly. That's a common error causing loose headsets.

You have to have the right touch to get the proper preload on the topcap. Too tight and it binds. Too loose is worse. This is something you'll recheck once the bike is complete and on the ground.
 

Attachments

·
Hueston Woods Trail Crew
Joined
·
1,844 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
DeeeRailleurs

If you are building a singlespeed, skip this step. You're a masochist anyway. You should be lifting weights instead of being online.

Dab a little grease on the derailleur bolt, make sure the b-screw and the plate it hits are in the right position and install into the derailleur hanger on yorur frame carefully. There's usually a tiny bit of play when it's in place, so don't 'try to tighten this away.
Notice the SRAM rear. Personal preference. Like the shifting and looks. Like Shimano in front, though.

Setting up the front derailleur is more of an art form. Put it in position, tighten the bolt just enought to keep it in place, but still able to slide up and down and around the seat tube.
If it's a new one, out of the box, it should have the little sticker that shows you where the chainring teeth should be in relation to the derailleur cage. If not, you want a 1-3mm clearance between the teeth of the big ring and the cage.

Now line the cage up parallel with the chainring. This is a good place to start. When you get to the final step of adjusting the shifting you may have to toe it in slightly. Now you can tighten the clamp to spec.
 

Attachments

·
Hueston Woods Trail Crew
Joined
·
1,844 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Bar details

There is no end to the discussion of what bar and stem combo to use.
I think the OS bars look cool, if nothing else. And your bike will look dated if you go skinny. (Might as well have anodized barends).
With the current popularity of carbon bars and oversize 31.8 stem combos, you will want to have a torque wrench on hand. Cuz who would want to put a hairline crack in their $120 carbon bars.
Keep in mind that many bars come fairly wide and can be cut back to suit you. But this may cause problems and void the warranty on carbon bars. So pick your bars accordingly. If you have a tendency to hit trees or the ground often, a carbon bar might not be wise.
Read the stem manufacturer's instructions for torque spec and apply evenly. Lightly grease the stem bolts. Alternately tighten the 4 bolts (or two) little by little. You don't want to torque one all the way before getting the others close. You want an equal gap on all corners of the clamping surface.
Then use the torque wrench alternately for the lightly greased side bolts to tighten the stem to the steerer tube.

Thomson Elite stems insist on using a torque wrench. Many people don't, and may have loosening issues,or worse, stripped bolts. Tighter is not always better, except in abs and buttocks. .
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
695 Posts
You are making this look too easy...esp just looking at the pics:D


Edit. Lemme guess, the hardest part is coming up with the scratch for that beautiful exogrid frame. I hear online begging is all the rage, perhaps its time to try.
 

·
Hueston Woods Trail Crew
Joined
·
1,844 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
What we have so far

Sun's going down. Too cold, too little light. Here's the bike so far.
Tomorrow brakes, shifters, grips, wheels, cassette, tires, chain, cables, test ride.
Weather permitting.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,683 Posts
Oh that brings back memories, Bobly, you are a legend. Keep up the GREAT work...
 
1 - 20 of 64 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top