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The cat's name is jake
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is an update related to another thread about frame fixtures.

I was in the process of making a new frame fixture in between other jobs, and based on the aforementioned thread, it sounded like other people wanted a fixture kit that was $1k or less. Since I am in the process of making a new one anyway, I thought I'd make 2 extra sets of parts in case someone else was interested.

Progress has happened, though I am by no means finished. Our garden project sort of got out of hand in the back yard on top of everything else, but I've still plugged along a few hours a week on making parts. Here's where I'm at so far:

Grey Parallel Metal Black-and-white Steel

Floor Metal Composite material Steel Machine


There are a few more parts to machine, then all the aluminum parts go off to anodizing. There is one person who is in line for a fixture, but one is still currently unspoken for. If you are looking for a simple, "cheap" fixture (cheap compared to existing options, I realize $1k isn't chump change for many), and don't want to make your own, here's your chance.

Totally unrelated, I needed another tubing protector at work (to protect the DT of a frame while it was held in a Park clamp for welding), and kludged together this guy. I've had to do this a few times, and discovered that bicycle chain worked pretty good as a quick hinge mechanism. Our lathes at work just stink for making small parts (too big, chuck won't hold small parts easily), so this was a happy discovery. Also, cutting the tubing clamp in half before brazing parts was easier than doing it after the fact, FWIW. Cutting it in half works best by using a slitting saw, and clamping the tubing directly into a T-slot.

Metal Iron Steel Composite material Cylinder
 

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Nice looking parts!
Do you plan on using the engraved angle markings to set it up?
I engraved my frame fixture hoping to use the edge of the extrusion for reference, but the resolution just isn't good enough - yours looks pretty decent though. I need to go back and put in a better "shelf" for my bevel protracor to make set up a little easier.
 

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The cat's name is jake
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274 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Adam,

Since the pivot point for the respective ST and HT fixturing beams are several inches from the engraved lines, there is adequate space between markings, and thus it is not difficult to directly discriminate the markings, much like on an Arctos fixture (which I am copying to a large degree). The pivot point is virtual - not actually existing on the plate itself, but several inches below it on the ST plate, and coincides with the bottom edge of the HT plate.

Your point is well taken though - on the Arctos fixture I use at work, my co-worker used to feel unsure of where to set things on occasion, though I myself never felt that lack of surety. I think I'm used to it in part, as it reminds me a bit of measuring liquid volumes in scientific glassware. Be conscious of parallax, and things are easy to set.
 

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The cat's name is jake
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274 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This stuff is so cool! Looking forward to seeing how the fixtures work. Is a slitting saw just mounted in the mill to do that kind of cut on your tube protector?
Hi Scott,

Yep - mount the slitting saw on an arbor, put it in the spindle on the mill, figure out where center is on your part, cut one side, then the other. One advantage of using a vertical spindle (if you have options) is you can slice one side, then the other, without having to re-fixture the part. If I were at home, my first inclination would be to use the horizontal spindle on my Deckel, but it's actually easier to use the vertical spindle to get to both sides of the work. The advantage of using the horizontal spindle is that it pushes the part tighter into the T-slot, rather than sideways out of the T-slot as is the case with the vertical spindle. In this case, the advantage of the horizontal spindle is outweighed by the fixturing convenience, though all of that is really neither here nor there - I'm expositing unnecessarily here.
 

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Hi Scott,

Yep - mount the slitting saw on an arbor, put it in the spindle on the mill, figure out where center is on your part, cut one side, then the other. One advantage of using a vertical spindle (if you have options) is you can slice one side, then the other, without having to re-fixture the part. If I were at home, my first inclination would be to use the horizontal spindle on my Deckel, but it's actually easier to use the vertical spindle to get to both sides of the work. The advantage of using the horizontal spindle is that it pushes the part tighter into the T-slot, rather than sideways out of the T-slot as is the case with the vertical spindle. In this case, the advantage of the horizontal spindle is outweighed by the fixturing convenience, though all of that is really neither here nor there - I'm expositing unnecessarily here.
That's great info for someone like me who's never used a slitting saw! So far Ive used die grinders or dremels for cuts like that. Not sure ill get to use one on my current frame, but maybe on my next build!
 

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The cat's name is jake
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274 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here's an update on the fixture kits - I'm now finished with the blocks that attach the extrusion material to the angle plates. I still need to make the standoffs for the dropout extrusion (simple lathe parts), cones for seat tube and head tubes, and the BB shell mount.

Photograph White Light Metal World
Plastic Composite material Metal Plywood Engineering
 

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The cat's name is jake
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Alrighty,

I have my model finished, and a few simple parts left to machine.
Blue Colorfulness Text Line Font


I'm officially retired from Co-Motion now, so I'll hopefully finish machining parts this next week, before I start my new job. I have some other fabrication work to do as well, but I'll try to get this done first, so I can get the aluminum parts to anodizing.
 

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Alrighty,

I have my model finished, and a few simple parts left to machine.
View attachment 891831

I'm officially retired from Co-Motion now, so I'll hopefully finish machining parts this next week, before I start my new job. I have some other fabrication work to do as well, but I'll try to get this done first, so I can get the aluminum parts to anodizing.
Jig is looking really nice. Regarding ano, is it mostly for visuals , or will alu used in this application last longer/work smoother"?

wiki:
electrolytic
passivation process used to increase the thickness of the natural oxide
layer on the surface of metal parts

Also curious what approximate % of total cost it adds to an 80/20 (with custom fabricated pieces) type jig such as yours(I realize the bigger the run the lower the cost per piece). Looking forward to seeing the finished product.

thanks, Brian
 

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The cat's name is jake
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hi Brian,

I want to anodize the parts for 2 main reasons.

1) Anodizing is not electrically conductive, and thus insulates the parts. I want the current to flow from the BB fixture, which is steel and makes good solid contact with the BB shell. Since the BB is the point at which most of the frame connects, this is the best place to ground your connection. I have found that allowing current to run through aluminum extrusions results in arcing across the extrusion surfaces, often creating craters. I highly recommend people use anodized extrusions as well, though it isn't required as long as the ground is attached to the BB fixture area.

2) Anodized surfaces are hard and slick. The anodized parts will hold up better over time, and slide better across each other better. Un-anodized surfaces tend to be a little "sticky", in my experience.

I'm not sure what the cost to anodize will be - I'm hoping it's not exorbitant.
 

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The cat's name is jake
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274 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Parts are all machined as of today, and I just dropped the aluminum ones off today at the anodizer. They should be done within 2 weeks and ready to ship.

I called Dan Hendrickson at Sun Source to order extrusion:

1) 1545s anodized x 40"
2) 1530s anodized x 26"
3) 1515s anodized x 8"
4) 1515s anodized x 18"
5) 1515s anodized x 28"
6) 3 end fasteners

Total came to around $153, + shipping (~$38)

Metal Machine Steel Iron Composite material

Metal Engineering Silver Steel Brass
 

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The cat's name is jake
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hi Blindboxx233,

These fixture kits this time around are $1000. Remember, they don't include the extrusion, which adds a small amount to the total cost. I did that for a few reasons - one, I don't want to ship that kind of thing, and it also allows people to get whatever they want that way. I'm really just making the bits that others might find a little more challenging to make on their own.

They are currently all spoken for, but there has been so much interest in them, that I might make another few kits in the future (if I make more, I'd probably charge closer to $1300 - the fasteners and anodizing added cost that I wasn't originally thinking of, and I'd like to use MIC6 plate instead of 6061 bar stock for some of the parts). If you are interested, please feel free to email me:

[email protected]
 

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The cat's name is jake
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Frame fixture kits are ALLLLLMOST complete. I need to turn down the center sections of some 135 axles, and I need to get a few oddball bolts, but otherwise kits are complete.

I'm going through the list of folks that emailed me, and trying to see who is really going through with purchasing the kits. One person has not responded to me, so I'm moving on down the list. The second person in-line originally seems pretty serious about going through with it.

Metal Grey Plastic Steel Aluminium

Light Tints and shades Ceiling Material property Lighting accessory

Metal Steel Composite material Aluminium Machine

Metal Steel Iron Parallel Composite material

Product Line Metal Steel Hardwood
 
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