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Perry Bessas outed this bike on the I-BOB list:

Pics: http://bessasandackerman.com/bob/px/

Tom Robinette followed up with:

Bryan is off on a field trip with his son, I'll do my best to fill in. Bryan
is my Lead Project Engineer at work and a frame builder, he's built roughly
2 dozen frames (single, tandem and even recumbent), however it has been at
least 8 years since he's built (having kids can do that ....). Once Bryan
decided the jig needed to be back in service, projects started brewing in
our heads. After he picked up a NOS of WTB Dirt Drops at Veloswap, he knew
that he was going to build a frame around the bars (he calls them his $2K
handlebars). Being an old-school mountain biker, he raced against guys like
Fisher and Murray back in the day, he patterned this bike off of an early
80's mtb but with an all-rounder intent. The frame is fully hand mitered and
fillet brazed, the dropouts were cut by hand from 4130 plate. Bryan also
designed and fabricated the fork, Type II, and stem, LD style. Chris Kelly
of Kelly bikes laid down the hand rubbed and clear coat powder. I'll let
Bryan fill in the rest of the details.

(Re: Perry)
RaceFace Atlas Cranks/BB/WTB pedals
Chris King Hubs/Mavic Rims/WTB Slickasaurus Tires - Build by Bryan
Chris King Headset
Paul Neo-retro brakes/Shimano Levers/Tektro interupters
NOS Suntour Seat Post w/NOS Hite-Rite
BRG Brooks Pro
Banana Bag

Bob Hufford
Springfield, MO
 

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Now that is a beatiful, smartly spec'd bike. Very nice. I've got a couple of expensive handlebar (or brakes, crankset...) originated bikes too. Nothing wrong with building a complete bike out of a simple part. In fact, that's the fun or creating something unique.
 

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BobHufford said:
Perry Bessas outed this bike on the I-BOB list:

Pics: http://bessasandackerman.com/bob/px/

Tom Robinette followed up with:

Bryan is off on a field trip with his son, I'll do my best to fill in. Bryan
is my Lead Project Engineer at work and a frame builder, he's built roughly
2 dozen frames (single, tandem and even recumbent), however it has been at
least 8 years since he's built (having kids can do that ....). Once Bryan
decided the jig needed to be back in service, projects started brewing in
our heads. After he picked up a NOS of WTB Dirt Drops at Veloswap, he knew
that he was going to build a frame around the bars (he calls them his $2K
handlebars). Being an old-school mountain biker, he raced against guys like
Fisher and Murray back in the day, he patterned this bike off of an early
80's mtb but with an all-rounder intent. The frame is fully hand mitered and
fillet brazed, the dropouts were cut by hand from 4130 plate. Bryan also
designed and fabricated the fork, Type II, and stem, LD style. Chris Kelly
of Kelly bikes laid down the hand rubbed and clear coat powder. I'll let
Bryan fill in the rest of the details.

(Re: Perry)
RaceFace Atlas Cranks/BB/WTB pedals
Chris King Hubs/Mavic Rims/WTB Slickasaurus Tires - Build by Bryan
Chris King Headset
Paul Neo-retro brakes/Shimano Levers/Tektro interupters
NOS Suntour Seat Post w/NOS Hite-Rite
BRG Brooks Pro
Banana Bag

Bob Hufford
Springfield, MO
Looks like nice work! It looks like that Type II copy is a unicrown?
 

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Witty McWitterson
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Hell, that's how most of my bikes are created! I've got enough parts right now to do up another Niner. Only missing brakes and a frame. I've built up a bike from a set of hubs before too.
 

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reply to fork question

ssmike said:
Hard to make out the upper leg, but it looks like a Type II. Check out the scallop treatment at the dropout.
The fork is made using 1.125 OD by .058 inch wall chrome-moly tubing for the legs and Columbus SP top tube material for the fork legs. They are silver soldered together to form each fork leg. I then used Shimano dropouts. This fork is modeled after the forks that Steve Potts has made. Many times I heard that his forks rode well and I wanted to try them out, so I made one. I am not fully testing it on this bike because I am using this as my version of a road bike, but my next full-on mountain-bike will also have them. Thanks, Bryan
 

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mondo fillet said:
The fork is made using 1.125 OD by .058 inch wall chrome-moly tubing for the legs and Columbus SP top tube material for the fork legs. They are silver soldered together to form each fork leg. I then used Shimano dropouts. This fork is modeled after the forks that Steve Potts has made. Many times I heard that his forks rode well and I wanted to try them out, so I made one. I am not fully testing it on this bike because I am using this as my version of a road bike, but my next full-on mountain-bike will also have them. Thanks, Bryan
Actual Type II or not, it's great just to see such a beautifully made bike. Post more detail shots. Not many people silver braze frames (Sachs comes to mind), let alone forks. I'm assuming the fillets on the frame are brass, yes?
 

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Indeed. That is mastery. Most lovely.

Even nailed the Potts spoon dropouts; so classy.

I'll bet she rides like the wind.
 

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Reply to silver brazing and how she rides

I only use silver solder in 3 joints. The first is the joint between the fork legs and the curved crown pieces, the second is the seat tube to the seat tube reinforcement (just below the top tube/seat stay joint) and the third is the head tube emblem (letter "B"). The rest of the frame is brazed with brass (actually it is Bronze, people just say brass). As far as the ride goes, she is rock solid down hill (just a blast). I think that this is a combination of the geometry and the fork. Sprinting over hills with the type II fork and the drop bars is pure fun. I really enjoy this bike. I was having my fingers go numb with flat bars. With the WTB drops that problem is gone now. I have a set of On One Midge drop bars on the shelf and look forward to another bike this next winter. As far a pictures go, a friend took the pictures and a friend of his put them on the website. As I understand it, more pictures are on the way very soon. Thanks for all of the positive feedback. I am really quite surprized. Thanks Again, Bryan
 

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The Stem

i'll tell you what i'm stoked on, is the use of that super trick looking LD threadless stem that apparently has a top cap on it with the centerbolt running into the star nut in the steerer tube of the fork, that is pure genius. By running that extenstion out of the top of the curved bit of the LD you can utilize that style of stem for a non-threaded fork, correct.

nice work, bike looks great.

how much for a Stem of that sort?

thanks

nate
 

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Reply to Stem Question

You are correct about the stem. I used a one inch steerer tube and a chris king threadless headset. Yes I have a draw down bolt on the stem just like a flat bar stem would have, except that I added an adapter to reach down to the star fangled nut. The nut is further away from the bottom of the bolt head in this application, even though I have the steerer tube inserted almost all the way up the straight section of the stem (stiffer that way). So in theory this stem can work with any one inch threadless steerer, but I like having as much overlap of the stem and steerer as possible. And I am not making them to sell at this time. I have time to either ride bikes or make them and in the spring, summer and fall months I choose to ride. Thanks, Bryan
 

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cursivearmy said:
i'll tell you what i'm stoked on, is the use of that super trick looking LD threadless stem that apparently has a top cap on it with the centerbolt running into the star nut in the steerer tube of the fork, that is pure genius. By running that extenstion out of the top of the curved bit of the LD you can utilize that style of stem for a non-threaded fork, correct.

nice work, bike looks great.

how much for a Stem of that sort?

thanks

nate
Another way to do it (without having the little quill bolt extension on the pretty curve of the LD) would be to run a top cap at the bottom of the steerer tube and have some sort of star nut (or the like) in the bottom of the LD stem. Sorta the opposite of what is standard now. You would have to remove your front wheel to adjust the headset but this would allow you to run a true LD on a threadless system.
 

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cursivearmy said:
i'll tell you what i'm stoked on, is the use of that super trick looking LD threadless stem that apparently has a top cap on it with the centerbolt running into the star nut in the steerer tube of the fork, that is pure genius. By running that extenstion out of the top of the curved bit of the LD you can utilize that style of stem for a non-threaded fork, correct.

nice work, bike looks great.

how much for a Stem of that sort?

thanks

nate
Nice brazed-on cable stop on the stem too. I can just hear Nate's mind reeling on the possibility of a new LD stem.
 

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oh, not to hyjack and all, but...

ssmike said:
Nice brazed-on cable stop on the stem too. I can just hear Nate's mind reeling on the possibility of a new LD stem.
i'm definetly stoked on that stem, would be perfect on the Potts of mine. i'm really worried actually at the moment on how the heck the said Potts is doing in the up's hands on it's way to Cali to visit you and DL, mike. hope it doesn't get beat up. Oh yeah, and DL, be on the lookout for your "package" tomorrow in the mail, sorry its so late, and also the brake levers i thought i had were worked, and not really that great, but the key components are there.

oh yeah, and bryan, seriously nice looking rig, and if you decide to build these later in the winter, let me know and i'd definetly order one for sure. nice work again.

nate
 

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Reply to "fillet brazed" on stem

I had thought about using a draw bolt from the bottom, threading into a star fangled nut in the stem, but I chose not to use that method for two reasons: The first is that adjustment would require wheel removal using a very long wrench or a very long bolt, and the second is that the insertion of a star fangled nut in the stem would reduce the allowable insertion of the steerer tube (I hate excess flex in such areas). Bryan
 

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mondo fillet said:
I had thought about using a draw bolt from the bottom, threading into a star fangled nut in the stem, but I chose not to use that method for two reasons: The first is that adjustment would require wheel removal using a very long wrench or a very long bolt, and the second is that the insertion of a star fangled nut in the stem would reduce the allowable insertion of the steerer tube (I hate excess flex in such areas). Bryan
Real nice work there Bryan. I dont know if Id even want to know the amount of hours that went into that! I think its neat that you did that. I wish I had those skills. Someday maybe I'll give it a go when my life calms down. :)

Regarding the stem, if you used a standard bolt head you could adjust it without wheel removal, or if you had a bit of clearance you could use an allen with the wheel still in place. You really only adjust the headset once (hopefully) anyway.

Ya, the star nut probably take up too much real estate. What about just brazing in a 1/16" plate or washer inside the stem with a nut brazed to that? That would allow you to slide the LD on and get some good overlap I would think...
 

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cursivearmy said:
i'm definetly stoked on that stem, would be perfect on the Potts of mine. i'm really worried actually at the moment on how the heck the said Potts is doing in the up's hands on it's way to Cali to visit you and DL, mike. hope it doesn't get beat up. Oh yeah, and DL, be on the lookout for your "package" tomorrow in the mail, sorry its so late, and also the brake levers i thought i had were worked, and not really that great, but the key components are there.

oh yeah, and bryan, seriously nice looking rig, and if you decide to build these later in the winter, let me know and i'd definetly order one for sure. nice work again.

nate
Sounds good Nate. Thanks a ton. See ya soon.
 
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