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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Anyone have an idea how long the Brooks Team Pro takes to break in? Is it tough to ride on until breakin occurs? Searched through 50 or so threads, couldn't find an an answer.

Have a new HH100X build, looking for the ultimate saddle. Currently riding on a WTB Laser V Progel (147mm across). Working out OK but I know there is something better out there for me.

The Koobi SI 1st gen (160mm across) was one of the more comfy saddles I've ridden. So I'm thinking I'll try another 160mm saddle, Team Pro fits the bill but I'm wary of riding with a sore butt for a few hundred miles even if the payoff is great at the end. Years of uncomfortable saddles have made me a bit skittish.

Regardless, of what I decide on, getting Ti rails.

Few other questions...

- B17 owners... how tough is it to work around the saddle when you're riding? I'm thinking 170mm might be too wide for me (never gone that wide). Can any non-clyde's shed some light on their experience with this saddle?

- B17 Narrow/Swift are similarly sized (155mm/152mm)... so they might work as well... but what's the differences between the saddles? How would a flatter versus another kind of profile affect comfort? Any input?

I'm semi upright on my ride and generally ride technical XC. Tried to measure my ischial span (outside to outside last night), came in around 150-152mm. Also did the Specialized Body Geometry butt meter, came out to 139-140mm.

Definitely going to order from Wallingford BTW, just haven't been able to get them on the phone. Rather than take advantage of their return policy, I'd prefer to get it right on the first go.

Any help/input is greatly appreciated.
 

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The B.17 is the most popular Brooks saddle and the one that I use.

As far as comfort goes during break-in....some riders think that they are super comfy from the 'go', others think that they are 'hard' . It really all depends on your previous experience and how well the particular saddle fits your body geo.

All Brooks leather saddles need to be 'broken in'. All this really means is that over a period of riding, the leather conforms to your sit-bones and you end up with two 'dents' in the leather near the rear of the saddle corresponding to your ischial tuberosities.

There is also some slight changes to the leather itself, a softening process which the leather undergoes during use and the application of proofide, weight and sweat.. :)

As far as moving around on the saddle during riding, I personally have no problems with the B.17, but I'm used to the width and I also ride a 29'er, which means that I don't have the same problems as 26 inch wheeled riders do.. :)

If you wear baggies, there is the danger of getting them caught up in the bag hangers on the rear of the saddle when you get off the back of it. If you are aware of it though, it usually presents no problems. Nics wearers don't have this problem.

Width and saddle choice is entirely up to you. The wider B.17 is more comfy for the majority of riders, but a B.17 narrow could serve your purpose better if your sit bones fit on it. The really narrow models can be very good if you are used to a narrow saddle.

Do you ride SS or geared? I ride SS and so I tend to stand and pedal a LOT, whereas geared riders tend to sit and spin a lot more, which means that the saddle will get to 'see' more of your rear end...so it will make a difference.

As far as the length of 'break-in' period goes, it varies from saddle to saddle and from rider to rider.

Some of my Brooks saddles are comfy right from the start, others have taken 6 months to break in properly.

If you want to short-cut the break-in period, then soaking the leather in Neatsfoot oil as Sheldon Brown suggests is an easy way out.

Personally, I prefer to break my Brooks in as per the "old" method... ie: ride it, a lot. :)

Wallingford give you the great warranty, and will also exchange the saddle for another if you are not happy with the fit. My recommendation is ... if you can get a demo ride on someones Brooks to try it out...do so.

I ride all my Brooks saddles with no padding and they are very comfy. Sure, it takes time to get them shaped to your butt, but that just means more riding ... and that can't be bad.. :)


R.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Rainman said:
The B.17 is the most popular Brooks saddle and the one that I use.

If you wear baggies, there is the danger of getting them caught up in the bag hangers on the rear of the saddle when you get off the back of it. If you are aware of it though, it usually presents no problems. Nics wearers don't have this problem.

Width and saddle choice is entirely up to you. The wider B.17 is more comfy for the majority of riders, but a B.17 narrow could serve your purpose better if your sit bones fit on it. The really narrow models can be very good if you are used to a narrow saddle.

Do you ride SS or geared? I ride SS and so I tend to stand and pedal a LOT, whereas geared riders tend to sit and spin a lot more, which means that the saddle will get to 'see' more of your rear end...so it will make a difference.

If you want to short-cut the break-in period, then soaking the leather in Neatsfoot oil as Sheldon Brown suggests is an easy way out.

R.
Thanks for the detailed reply.

-Riding geared.
-Typically ride with Sugoi and some cordura freeride baggies over. Out here in the desert of AZ, need some additional protection if you spill. :D

So any experience with the Team Pro or know anyone that does? It seems to be in a sweet spot between the 17 and Swift with respect to dimensions. But I'm concerned about Sheldon's comment regarding thicker leather. I guess I'm hoping for a saddle epiphany if possible. LOL.

I think one of the reason why I'm having a tough time figuring out which saddle to pick up is Brooks' use of the word "racing" in the catalog. The association I make with that word is hard and uncomfortable.
 

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I found the narrower Brooks saddles didn't fit my wide sit bones. However, you may like the narrow ones better. It really does depend on your bone geo.

The thicker the leather, the longer it takes to 'soften' and break in.

Disregard the word "racing" in the cattledog.. :)

What it means is that the narrower saddles are traditionally associated with the road racer / rider who spends a lot of time in the more 'aero' position of leaning forward and spinning fast.

This doesn't mean that the narrow models can't also be used for mountain biking, it just means that they may not be as comfortable in the more upright position used in the majority of offroad riding.

HTH,


R.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Rainman said:
I found the narrower Brooks saddles didn't fit my wide sit bones. However, you may like the narrow ones better. It really does depend on your bone geo.

The thicker the leather, the longer it takes to 'soften' and break in.

Disregard the word "racing" in the cattledog.. :)

What it means is that the narrower saddles are traditionally associated with the road racer / rider who spends a lot of time in the more 'aero' position of leaning forward and spinning fast.

This doesn't mean that the narrow models can't also be used for mountain biking, it just means that they may not be as comfortable in the more upright position used in the majority of offroad riding.

HTH,

R.
Gotcha... thanks for the information. I think the B17 Ti is the way to go for the time being.

I'm an excellent driver... 347 toothpicks. Sorry, favorite movie.
 

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The B.17 Ti is a great saddle. Persevere with the break-in, follow Brooks saddle-care instructions, and the saddle will probably last you 20+ years of comfortable riding.

How's that for value in this throw-away world? :)


R.
 
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