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How long does it take to break in a new disc brake and is there a best way / technique to do it. I have a new front BB7 that I was given for christmas. I know there is a break in period for discs, but it just slows me down; I am eager to be able to stop again!
 

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you need to find a big hill, ride as fast as you can down and grab a handful of brake for about 5 seconds..HARD.....repeat this process a handfull of times and then you'll have nice graby brakes. Be sure to put your but back or you go over the front end once the rotor starts to get hot. Be sure not to "Ride" the brake as this will not do the same thing and will only glaze over your rotor to the point where it will only slow you down and not"grab" at the rotor.....hope this helps...have fun, but be sure to hang that ass off the back, or you'll kiss the ground....

aaa yeah
 

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My LBS just convinced Avid to send clean sweep rotors to replace my gobbling J7 polygon rotors. Avid fought it hard, too - they did NOT want to send the replacement rotors. Anyway, they specified the following bed in procedure:
Get up some speed and LIGHTLY apply the brakes while maintaining forward motion (drag the brakes) for a while and release - do NOT come to a full stop - repeat this several times. The purpose is to transfer a uniform layer of brake pad material to the rotor. After several passes of light dragging / releasing / repeating, THEN get up speed and make several hard stops to get some heat in the brakes.
That was the end of their instructions - I'd add to not completely stop with the brakes hot because that might create rotor hot spots - make the hard stops, get the brakes hot, and then roll for a while to keep the rotors spinning while the brakes cool (this from my car racing / brake bedding days).
 

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wddamf said:
Not sure, but I'm wondering if that might create uneven cooling on the rotors - possibly resulting in uneven internal stress in the metal - leading to warping.
I guess you refer to my post... I once read it on a mag in an interview to a Shimano mechanic....... has worked for me a couple of times... bike brakes don't get that warm after 1 stop...
 

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Yep - I don't have any data to say that squirting water is a BAD idea - just basing my comments on materials class in college - material behavior as a result of heating and quenching. You're right in that there may not be enough heat there to be concerned with. But those rotors are thin and probably not made of a very high quality steel. You're probably right, but I'm not squirting my rotors :D
 

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wddamf said:
Yep - I don't have any data to say that squirting water is a BAD idea - just basing my comments on materials class in college - material behavior as a result of heating and quenching. You're right in that there may not be enough heat there to be concerned with. But those rotors are thin and probably not made of a very high quality steel. You're probably right, but I'm not squirting my rotors :D
Point taken ;)
 

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Hope recommend pouring water over the caliper during the initial break-in process. I sand my pads every 100 miles or so to freshen the surface and find that the pads bed back in much more quickly if I use the 'wash' method that Hope suggests. I also find that I get less noise when they are bedded in.
I also wouldn't pour anything over the rotors or calipers after, say, a long descent, but bedding pads is a ten minute job on a the flat (I'm not going near a hill until my brakes do what they should!!).
Peace,
Steve
 

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Another little trick with bedding in pads... Mark your rotors with a marker pen across the braking area of the rotor.....you can then see at a glance whether the pads are contacting the rotor all the way across the surface, and if they are dragging on the rotor arms a bit...which you don't want.

If you see wear on the rotor arms...if the marker pen is worn off there, you need to use a couple of stainless steel washers to lift the caliper up a tad to get the pads off the arms.

I usually run my pads in by dampening the rotors after the initial soft braking procedure is finished, and rubbing a little dust onto the rotors. I find that it helps to take the 'shine' off.

A few rides is usually all it takes to get a full pad/rotor contact. Good brake action is achieved within a few days.



R.
 
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