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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My buddy gave me an old schwinn homegrown, it has a rock shox long travel SID dual air fork that seems like is isn't working, leaking oil & not compressing at all. I called Sram and they suggested two re-builders (hippie Tech & Suspension Experts), but leaned towards hippie Tech.
Anyone have any experience with them or know if it is worth rebuilding old gear as opposed to buying new? I'd prefer to go the cheaper route and see if this grows on me.
kind of surprised that there aren't any place in SoCal or CA in general.

I'm completely new to this, and actually haven't ridden a bike in ages and haven't had this in the dirt yet since the fork is essentially solid. I've just been riding locally to get used to riding again, have a flat now so time for some tools and work on repair skills too!

Thanks for any input!
 

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Your call....

but the old SID is likely pretty flexy. They were designed as an XC Race fork so saving weight was the priority over durability and stiffness. A reasonble replacement fork would likely run you between $300 and $400. I'd call Hippe Tech, Suspension Experts, and Push Industries to get a ball park on what a rebuild would cost you. Hippe Tech would be the ones to call first though. They have quite a bit of experience and are more likely to have the parts to do your old SID. If it pushes to much past $200 for the job, I'd say go with a newer fork.

Good Dirt
 

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Avoid Hippie Tech at all costs. Just run a search if you want to find out why.

Push Industries won't work on that generation SID.

EDIT: I agree withe AndrwSwitch below on not putting a Tora on a Homegrown. Put something on there worthy of the frame.
 

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Definitely price the work a few places.

But the SID had a reputation for being a high-maintenance fork. The Homegrown is a racing bike, so suggesting a Tora feels wrong to me. But they're supposed to be one of the best values going in a new fork right now. The Reba is a pretty popular light-ish, raceable trail fork.

You can also rebuild the fork yourself, if you don't mind working with your hands. I haven't done the SID, but I rebuilt my own a while ago. I don't know what year your fork is, but here's a service manual.

EDIT: I meant to add that rebuilding my fork wasn't that difficult, but finding all the right oils to do the job can be a pain.

http://www.sram.com/_media/pdf/rockshox/forks/sid/03_04SIDServiceGuide.pdf

The SID platform has changed a couple times, I think, so you'd need to find the correct manual for your year. This should be pretty representative, though.

With a lot of air forks, the O-rings on the air pistons get worn out and that's why the forks stop working. The rebuild manuals have part numbers, so your authorized Rock Shox dealer can order them (hopefully.) I don't know if you could order something from a hardware catalog with any confidence. I might try it on a cheap fork, but I'd be inclined to just get the OEM part for a nice fork on my main bike.

You can also just get a nice carbon-fiber fork, and have a frameset that will make weight weenies cream their cycling shorts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So hippie is bad? I'll google as you suggested. That's disappointing to hear because they were saying I'd be looking at $150 max.

As mentioned push doesn't work on old stuff and Rockshox, now Sram doesn't do it either, spension experts said he'd have to see it in person to determine if he coud do it. The guy at push said that hippie bought all the old stock of parts.

I am mechanically inclined but from the bit I've read it looked like it was worth the $150 to have someone else deal with sourcing hard to find parts and the assembly. I've only ridden around town an was hoping to see if this was something I even wanted to get into. Also the old fork apparently has just 100mm of travel, apparently that's the norm now.

I'll try and search for the hippie horror stories, and consider a cheap fork to try. So this homegrown is still viable??

Thanks for all the helpful input and apologize for any typos, iPhone does some idiotic stuff!
 

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Not google, search on MTBR.

If you can afford to, strongly consider just upgrading to a new fork. The new SID is an excellent option.

Yes, the Homegrown is still very much a viable option. Quite a few people on here still ride them, myself included. My two favorite bikes:

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good to know that it's still an ok choice, I think this one is from 1999.

When you say flexy I take that as being too soft and maybe bouncy...like a bad shock on a car? I was looking at wheelworld, they are close to where I live, they have some low end marzocchi forks in the $250 range, would those be crappy?

Is rockshox a decent choice compared to fox, marzocchi or others...generally speaking?
I realize it's best to compare specific models.

I'll try and post a pic, not sure how via phone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A little bit of wifi, I've been searching more and came across the posts others have mentioned. I'm looking into dirtlabs and garageworkssuspension, hoping GW can do it since they are sort of local.

Here's the pix of the bike...a long way from the schwinn varsity I used to ride!




 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I dropped it off at Garageworks Suspension the other day, so I'm bike-less for about two weeks, but hoping the wait will be well worth it. I'll hit back when I get it and ride a trail.
 

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If funds allow, I would replace that fork. The standard SID was a noodle, and the long travel SID was quite terrible. You'd never quite be sure which direction the bike would choose to go.

Check your front tire, it looks like it's on backwards.
 

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Bad Mechanic, out of curiosity, why is your saddle so far back on that homegrown? You look like you would be way too far behind the BB to be efficient. Also, how do you deal with chain stretch with vertical dropouts, no tensioner and no ecc. BB?
 

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Mount Dora Cycles said:
Bad Mechanic, out of curiosity, why is your saddle so far back on that homegrown? You look like you would be way too far behind the BB to be efficient.
It's because I have long legs relative to my height, and therefore need to position my saddle further back to achieve the correct distance between saddle and BB.

Mount Dora Cycles said:
Also, how do you deal with chain stretch with vertical dropouts, no tensioner and no ecc. BB?
The hardtail uses a Forward Components EBB which is designed for standard bottom brackets. The full suspension uses a White Eno Eccentric hub. In my opinion, the FC EBB and White Eno Eccentric are the two best tensioning systems available, including track ends.

http://forwardcomponents.blogspot.com/
http://www.whiteind.com/rearhubs/singlespeedhubs.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I totally hear you, things are a bit tight now and the repair of this is cheaper than a new fork.

I don't have an ebay account yet nor the knowledge if I'm buying some used beaten up thing. Do you think that this dual air lt sid will be that awful....even if it is set up specifically? I only dropped it off the other day, it isn't going to be touched for a week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Finally have a decent internet connection, and got the bike back and a few rides! It took a few weeks to get the work done, mainly due to scheduling mismatches but they were able to rebuild it for $175. The rear shock is ok for now, good enough for me to ride and learn.

I went on a single track trail that had some sections I couldn't make it through and had to put my foot down or walk short bit, overall a really fun time. I even got to use the m-19 multi tool on my first trail ride when the chain popped. The day after that ride I wasn't working so I took the trail going the other way through some crazy rock formations with some steep sections that ended up as a fire road. Again had to put my foot down a bunch, there were some pretty steep sections and I forgot to lower the seat. There was a point where the fire road was a long downhill and I realized quickly that meant a long boring trudging uphill in the hot sun. On the way back there were a few sections I just couldn't make and for the finale I went over the bars at the very bottom but was really luck to have been able to just walk off the front w/o falling. It was a pretty steep section.

My buddy who gave me the bike wanted me to head up to mammoth and go downhilling, if I had insurance I'd have been a bit more stoked! Went for it anyway, full face helmet, knee/shin guards and the padded moto jacket, I was ready and bugged out too. I really haven't ridden since my schwinn varsity days. My friend had a newly built yeti and I was on his "superseded" santa cruz nomad, I lowered the seat all the way to help lessen the fear factor. I have to say it was an awesome experience and I had a blast, we went down some pretty hectic trails and I was able to make it down most stuff and w/o any bad crashes (knock wood). What those bikes are capable of is crazy, the one I was on is a cross country, the yeti was like a dirt bike. I hope work picks up so I can get into that too, the safety gear is pretty costly.
 
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