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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Fargo has Shimano centerlock rotors and had avid bb7 brakes on it. The rotors are not ice tech. I think I paid around 15-20 bucks a rotor. Today I installed new Jones bars and took my used but good slx hydros and installed them. I had to bleed them both out which made a mess. I washed my bike afterwards to clean up all the mineral oil. Some definitely got on the brakes. After washing I removed the pads and sanded them till they showed gold flakes again. I took rubbing alcohol on a rag and cleaned both rotors. This thing squawks so bad when I brake it is embarrassing. Not typical squeal or squeak but LOUD. What else can I do to bring them back to life. The rotors have maybe 300 miles on them. The brake pads on the hydros maybe have 500-1000 but still got plenty of lining left.
 

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My Fargo has Shimano centerlock rotors and had avid bb7 brakes on it. The rotors are not ice tech. I think I paid around 15-20 bucks a rotor. Today I installed new Jones bars and took my used but good slx hydros and installed them. I had to bleed them both out which made a mess. I washed my bike afterwards to clean up all the mineral oil. Some definitely got on the brakes. After washing I removed the pads and sanded them till they showed gold flakes again. I took rubbing alcohol on a rag and cleaned both rotors. This thing squawks so bad when I brake it is embarrassing. Not typical squeal or squeak but LOUD. What else can I do to bring them back to life. The rotors have maybe 300 miles on them. The brake pads on the hydros maybe have 500-1000 but still got plenty of lining left.
I don't know if one can ever rid pad material of a liquid that absorbs into it. Not sure if that's the issue though.

It's difficult to say if the brakes would have squealed even if not for the oil on the pads.

Maybe they were not well sanded (uneven).

I suppose you could sand the pads more to perhaps flatten them. Squeaking could be from poor contact due to uneven sanding.

Also, loosen the caliper and recenter the caliper to rotor -it may be mismatched.

That's all I got.

There are 4 or 5 people here that can fix anything.
I'm a bit surprised they haven't already chimed in but they should be by shortly to tell you what to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't know if one can ever rid pad material of a liquid that absorbs into it. Not sure if that's the issue though.

It's difficult to say if the brakes would have squealed even if not for the oil on the pads.

Maybe they were not well sanded (uneven).

I suppose you could sand the pads more to perhaps flatten them. Squeaking could be from poor contact due to uneven sanding.

Also, loosen the caliper and recenter the caliper to rotor -it may be mismatched.

That's all I got.

There are 4 or 5 people here that can fix anything.
I'm a bit surprised they haven't already chimed in but they should be by shortly to tell you what to do.
Thanks but they chattering noise was there after washing the bike. I then disassembled and cleaned and sanded. It doesn't seem to have worked. In all fairness I didn't go do a bunch of burn ins although pads are used so not sure if that would be necessary anyways. It was so loud around the neighborhood that I was afraid of waking the neighbors tonight lol.
 

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IF the pads are contaminated which it sounds like they are I've tried the following with excellent results.

Step 1: Remove pads
Step 2: Grab propane torch
Step 3: Take pads & torch outside, place pads on ground, light torch
Step 4: Torch pads 1 minute each pad. Keep torch 2-3 inches away, make em smoke, do it for a minute each.
Step 5: While waiting for pads to cool clean rotors and calipers liberally with rubbing alcohol and clean cloth or paper towels.
Step 6: Lightly sand pads with clean sand paper, reinstall.

I've done this a handful of times over the years on various bikes owned by various people. Usually contaminated with mineral oil or chain lube. It's worked every time. Although last time I had to torch twice as the first round wasn't quite long enough, still sounded like a pissed off goose. I did a rather messy bleed job and neglected to clean my rotors, so much for saving time :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
IF the pads are contaminated which it sounds like they are I've tried the following with excellent results.

Step 1: Remove pads
Step 2: Grab propane torch
Step 3: Take pads & torch outside, place pads on ground, light torch
Step 4: Torch pads 1 minute each pad. Keep torch 2-3 inches away, make em smoke, do it for a minute each.
Step 5: While waiting for pads to cool clean rotors and calipers liberally with rubbing alcohol and clean cloth or paper towels.
Step 6: Lightly sand pads with clean sand paper, reinstall.

I've done this a handful of times over the years on various bikes owned by various people. Usually contaminated with mineral oil or chain lube. It's worked every time. Although last time I had to torch twice as the first round wasn't quite long enough, still sounded like a pissed off goose. I did a rather messy bleed job and neglected to clean my rotors, so much for saving time :(
I'll give that a shot
 

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IF the pads are contaminated which it sounds like they are I've tried the following with excellent results.

Step 1: Remove pads
Step 2: Grab propane torch
Step 3: Take pads & torch outside, place pads on ground, light torch
Step 4: Torch pads 1 minute each pad. Keep torch 2-3 inches away, make em smoke, do it for a minute each.
Step 5: While waiting for pads to cool clean rotors and calipers liberally with rubbing alcohol and clean cloth or paper towels.
Step 6: Lightly sand pads with clean sand paper, reinstall.

I've done this a handful of times over the years on various bikes owned by various people. Usually contaminated with mineral oil or chain lube. It's worked every time. Although last time I had to torch twice as the first round wasn't quite long enough, still sounded like a pissed off goose. I did a rather messy bleed job and neglected to clean my rotors, so much for saving time :(
I agree with this^

If that fails buy new pads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well the torch thing appears to have quieted them down. One more question though. They are bled out good and both levers are solid and not spongy and hold pressure. So I know there’s no air in it. But it appears as if the back caliper retracts more when you release the lever then the front therefore there’s more travel in the rear lever before the pads make contact with the rotor. Yet the front caliper is not hanging up and the wheel will spin freely. Is this typical variance in a not so perfect world and should I just not worry about it? The thing is that I can’t adjust the reach adjustment screw as low on the right lever as I can on the left, for this reason, without the rear lever being closer than I prefer to the grip. Otherwise I guess there’s no issue
 

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Happy to hear that the pad burn worked for you.

Regarding the piston throw, and I'm not an expert on this, I would assume you would have to rebleed with a block or you could remove the wheel on the side with more lever throw, pump the brake handle (how much is too much I don't know). Pumping (no more than one pull, possibly less) the handle with the rotor removed should push the pistons out a bit & set them in place, this should reduce the starting distance of the pads & should reduce throw. If you don't press them out too far.
But more than likely you'll want to start a new thread asking this question in order to get answers from those with more experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Happy to hear that the pad burn worked for you.

Regarding the piston throw, and I'm not an expert on this, I would assume you would have to rebleed with a block or you could remove the wheel on the side with more lever throw, pump the brake handle (how much is too much I don't know). Pumping (no more than one pull, possibly less) the handle with the rotor removed should push the pistons out a bit & set them in place, this should reduce the starting distance of the pads & should reduce throw. If you don't press them out too far.
But more than likely you'll want to start a new thread asking this question in order to get answers from those with more experience.
It's all good. The brakes work really well and this is a minor issue that in the grand scheme of things isn't hurting anything. Thinking back to my automotive days the square cut seal on a brake caliper piston is supposed to rock backwards after the brakes are released to pull the piston back away from the rotor. I was just assuming these little bitty bike calipers had the same design. I would've thought by applying the brakes it would've set the distance to the rotor automatically. Either way both brakes are solid and work well. The rear lever just has more travel is all.
 
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