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I would like to improve the breaking on my daughter's kona 134 process. She is doing longer downhill runs and is getting some brake fade. I believe she has 160 in the rear and 180 up front. Would you recommend just swapping the rear to a 180, or increase the rotor size on the front as well? Thx Pete
 

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yes. bigger rotors are stronger and have more surface area to shed heat.

but you could also stop once in awhile and just take in the scenery.

who says you need to ride 1000' straight down without stopping to enjoy the view.

im 255lbs and my brakes are still alive.

how heavy is your daughter's bike?
 

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Upping the rear rotor is a good call regardless. Also, MTB brakes typically fade due to the pad exceeding its ideal operating temperature. So besides bigger rotors, pad material is important too. Sintered pads have higher operating temps than organic.
 

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160 mm rotors are a joke — you might as well drag your feet. For that matter, I think 180mm rotors are a joke too.🤣

For someone lighter like I presume your daughter is, I’d go 180 rear and 200 front. It sounds like she is descending legit downhill terrain, or at least reasonably steep terrain. Boosting both rotors up a size will greatly help heat dissipation, and provide more bite with less effort at the levers.

She may need to improve her technique as well. I find that the vast majority of riders, “experts” included —use far too much rear brake and not enough front. Dragging the rear tire does very little to slow you down, and the more you rely on it, the more you have to use it, which causes overheating, then more lever effort, etc.

Using plenty of front brake shifts your weight forward and presses the front tire hard into the dirt, where it can dig in and truly slow you down. The rear brake merely provides assistance and can help you square up corners. Finally, relying on too much rear braking and not enough front tears up the trails.

Finally, if she’s not already doing this, teach her to look for good braking terrain, brake there, then let off completely on rough sections, then back on again when there’s good traction again. This gives the brakes time to cool off.
 

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160 mm rotors are a joke — you might as well drag your feet. For that matter, I think 180mm rotors are a joke too.

For someone lighter like I presume your daughter is, I’d go 180 rear and 200 front. It sounds like she is descending legit downhill terrain, or at least reasonably steep terrain. Boosting both rotors up a size will greatly help heat dissipation, and provide more bite with less effort at the levers.

She may need to improve her technique as well. I find that the vast majority of riders, “experts” included —use far too much rear brake and not enough front. Dragging the rear tire does very little to slow you down, and the more you rely on it, the more you have to use it, which causes overheating, then more lever effort, etc.

Using plenty of front brake shifts your weight forward and presses the front tire hard into the dirt, where it can dig in and truly slow you down. The rear brake merely provides assistance and can help you square up corners. Finally, relying on too much rear braking and not enough front tears up the trails.

Finally, if she’s not already doing this, teach her to look for good braking terrain, brake there, then let off completely on rough sections, then back on again when there’s good traction again. This gives the brakes time to cool off.
Funny.



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He is an exception. Likely a rare one. I don’t know any downhillers or enduro racers who use anything but 200s or bigger.

What’s your point?
My point is that you’re recommending gigantic brake rotors for a young woman

A) who lives in a town where the biggest decent is 339ft in 0.9 miles

and

B) rides a Kona Process 134


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My point is that you’re recommending gigantic brake rotors for a young woman

A) who lives in a town where the biggest decent is 339ft in 0.9 miles

and

B) rides a Kona Process 134


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What part of OP’s post mentions where he/she lives? I saw “my daughter is beginning to ride longer downhill runs and is getting brake fade.” He also mentioned his daughter runs a 160mm rotor in the back. That’s all there was to go on.

Changing to a 180 in the back will likely help quite a bit. 200 in the front will not hurt a thing. I’m confused as to why people (yourself likely included) go “OMG are you nuts running a 200 mm rotor?!???”

My wife is a novice, weighs 135 pounds, and can ride my enduro bike on green and blue trails without a single issue with my brakes.

I stand by my advice, and would give it again. What better advice do you have to give? Since you seem to know something about OP and his daughter that I don’t, let’s hear your advice.

Oh, that’s right, you’re the guy who primarily just picks apart my posts as well as countless others, inserting your none-too-subtle sense of superiority. I forgot.
 

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I clicked on his profile, and looked up where he lived on Trailforks. Call me crazy, but I don't hand out advice to people without at least trying to understand where they live and how they ride. Try it sometime, eh?
 

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I clicked on his profile, and looked up where he lived on Trailforks. Call me crazy, but I don't hand out advice to people without at least trying to understand where they live and how they ride. Try it sometime, eh?
Okay, I will call you crazy.

Because if someone asks a reasonable question and provides a reasonable amount of description and detail, I don’t know, I think it’s rational to go ahead and answer it.

And your argument is essentially “no, you have to investigate the original threadstarter and see where they’re from and if they’re even asking the right questions and if they’re even qualified to ask them.”

Yeah, I’m the crazy one.

I apologize, MTBR— I will henceforth conduct a thorough investigation into each threadstarter’s background before responding to anything. Because that’s what all responsible members do.🤣
 
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