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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all foxy guys...

I have a VAN36 RC2 bought one year ago and I'm very pleased with the performance.

The only problem I found is the "too linear" response. I use the stock spring and I'm 79Kg (175 lbs).

A 3 or 4 feet drop-off is enought to bottom it out (with the High speed regulator fully closed)

Questions:
- do I run a soft spring for my weight ?
- do the internal bottom-out knob will fix that behaviour ?
- should I open it and change to a more viscuous oil ?

What's wrong?

Thank you all for your attention !!
 

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Another festivus MIRACLE!
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What year is the fork? The 07 VANs have an internal bottom out feature.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
bullit71 said:
What year is the fork? The 07 VANs have an internal bottom out feature.
Thank you for you answer

The fork was bought January 2006, and the user manual says it has this internal regulation, but it must be done by Fox's technical service.

I followed a thread that talks about opening the fork and adjusting the internals, but before breaking something, I would like to know other opinions about that issue...
 

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noMAD man
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Same dampers?

I actually thought the dampers in both year model forks were the same...just that Fox now gives the blessing to open up the cart and make adjustments and change cart oil. The pics in their service instructions look like the same carts to me...maybe an internal difference. I have the '06 model also and have changed the cart oil. I didn't have to change the bottomout adjuster, however. A guy named, RaD, posted an excellent post on this and pointed out the 8mm nut on the end of the damper shaft near the high/low compression knob as being the bottomout adjuster...turn in or out as needed to increase or decrease bottomout. That part is quite easy. The real work, and it's not that hard for sure, is refilling the bladder with oil and making sure there's no air in it. If RaD is right on that point of bottomout adjustment, it would seem you''d be able to access that 8mm nut by just pulling out the stanchions from the lowers as shown in this pic. As I said, bottomout was perfect for me, so I didn't try to adjust it.
 

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Thanks TNC for the reply, I followed this thread you pointed.

Actually I've just found the Fox link where all the steps involving fork maintenance are.

Link to Fox 36 VAN RC2 Service Guide


It is only a matter of following those steps and be patience and delicate....

I will give a try, changing to a stiffer spring, because is the easiest modification, then I'll try the bottom-out adjustment....

Thank you for your answer!
 

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Well not having actually taken one apart I cant be sure but I was told by someone at fox the three soft/medium/firm bottom out should be on the end of the damper rod when you pull it out. Also he said all that is needed to bleed the system is to open the top part only drain it then fill it 100% with oil and use a torch/heat gun on the cardridge body to heat up and degase any air bubbles.

So like I said I havent done it yet but if that is true it is alot easier than having to take it all apart.

also I would try the botome out first so you dont ruin the small bump sensitivity.
 

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carpe mañana
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Jesse Hill said:
Also he said all that is needed to bleed the system is to open the top part only drain it then fill it 100% with oil and use a torch/heat gun on the cardridge body to heat up and degase any air bubbles.
That sounds really safe. :thumbsup: :skep:

If you want to see if there is an adjuster in the damper and don't really feel like messing with changing the oil, keep the fork attached to the bike, flip the bike upside down, undo the brake caliper and remove the wheel. Undo the footnuts and slide off the lowers. All the oil will deposit in the stanchions. You have have a few drippings from oil around the seals. Check for the adjuster, adjust it if it's there (I'm guessing this is some sort of a volume adjuster for a bottomout chamber?) and reassemble.

_MK
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've changed the spring to a stiffer one. I'll open all High-Low knobs and begin to test. If I loose the small bump sensitivity I'll go back to the standard coil and set the bottom-out reg fully closed....

we'll see what happends...

Best Regards !
 

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burnout said:
I've changed the spring to a stiffer one. I'll open all High-Low knobs and begin to test. If I loose the small bump sensitivity I'll go back to the standard coil and set the bottom-out reg fully closed....

we'll see what happends...

Best Regards !
Yeah, you're right between springs, so just have to see how it rides. Remember to back out the preload knob.

I'm at the low end (150lb) for the blue spring, so I should have no bottoming issues, but I also hope small bumps are smooth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
fsrxc said:
Yeah, you're right between springs, so just have to see how it rides. Remember to back out the preload knob.

I'm at the low end (150lb) for the blue spring, so I should have no bottoming issues, but I also hope small bumps are smooth.
thats the "problem" with coil sprung suspensions, you have to fiddle with coils to get the best performance, instead of air sprung suspensions (pump it up/down a little bit it's enought).

tested at home, seems that the stiffer spring will not bottom out (of course). With the standard one, at home, a full push with my body weight left only 1 inch of travel free :nono: ...

I'll post the results....
 

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MK_ said:
That sounds really safe. :thumbsup: :skep:

well its not my instructions but also it is not uncommon to use heat to release air in systems.
its not like I am saying to use an acetylene torch set on high or something super hot just warm it up. Personally I would use a heat gun so it doesnt discolor the cardridge body.
 

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Jesse Hill said:
MK_ said:
That sounds really safe. :thumbsup: :skep:

well its not my instructions but also it is not uncommon to use heat to release air in systems.
its not like I am saying to use an acetylene torch set on high or something super hot just warm it up. Personally I would use a heat gun so it doesnt discolor the cardridge body.
Well I've never heard of it.
More often it's suggested to cycle a damper up and down to release air.
At the least I would wonder what the heat could do to rubber/plastic o-rings and seals?
 

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well as I said heat the cardridge "body" the big center part not where the o-rings or guide bushings will be. And yes cycling is part of the procedure but sometimes heat is used to make air bubbles bigger so the go up to the surface quicker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm back from my mountain bike weekend. An aggressive trail ride full of rocks and a short session of dirt jumping ( I have basic skills dirt jumping) was a good test for the stiffer coil modification.

Recall: I'm 78 Kg (172 lbs) undressed :ihih: , around 81 Kg (178) ready for the battle.., I changed the standard coil (blue) in my 36 VAN RC2 for the next stiffer one (green, supplied with the fork).

After isntalling the stiffer coil, I can say that this is MY coil. I lost some of the initial sensitivity in benefit of a more stable fork, and less prone to bottom out. Nevertheless I'm still bottom it out, but not so often. This is, I think, a matter of Hydraulic bottom-out regulation....

I encourage all of you around this weight range (170-190) to test both coils because coils are not NASA calibrated and sometimes a 45lb/in spring rate is not so exact, so supplied guidelines are not always real guidelines....

Changing the spring will only take 5 minutes.
 

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noMAD man
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It really sounds like it's worth your time to pull the lowers and turn that adjuster in a bit, but perhaps if you're only bottoming in the most severe cases, then you may on the money. Personally I hate to lose small bump compliance to address a bottomout issue, but preference strongly comes into play here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
TNC said:
Personally I hate to lose small bump compliance to address a bottomout issue, but preference strongly comes into play here.
Yeah! Me too, I was very pleased with the sensitivity with the standard coil, but bottoming it out several times in a single day, it is not the best for the fork health....:nono:

As I have to modify, for sure, the bottom-out setting, then I will test with both coils once again to be really sure what is the best allround coil for my taste.

Regards/Saludos
 

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MK_ said:
That sounds really safe. :thumbsup: :skep:

If you want to see if there is an adjuster in the damper and don't really feel like messing with changing the oil, keep the fork attached to the bike, flip the bike upside down, undo the brake caliper and remove the wheel. Undo the footnuts and slide off the lowers. All the oil will deposit in the stanchions. You have have a few drippings from oil around the seals. Check for the adjuster, adjust it if it's there (I'm guessing this is some sort of a volume adjuster for a bottomout chamber?) and reassemble.

_MK
That's not a bad idea. I'll give that a try.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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burnout said:
thats the "problem" with coil sprung suspensions, you have to fiddle with coils to get the best performance, instead of air sprung suspensions (pump it up/down a little bit it's enought)....
No, that's the "problem" with manufacturers that don't seem to think you should be able to easily adjust the progression of the suspension. I can get my marzocchi very plush, with plenty of sag, but keep it from bottoming out due to the oil height adjustment. Why other manufacturers don't think this is important is beyond me, because one size DOES NOT fit all, more agressive riders need a more progressive fork, and less agressive ones need a less progressive fork. So there are coil forks out there that don't have this problem.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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Hardtails Are Better said:
The 36 does have adjustable bottom out, as has been stated in this thread. I just wish it was external.
That doesn't even mean it can be adjusted to be smoothly "progressive" through the stroke, just that the end stroke will prevent bottom out. And are "three settings" enough?
 
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