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Discussion Starter #1
I took a weekend ride that had some pavement / grassy areas. My tires picked up quite a few of those thorn balls, and I didn't bother stopping to pick them out because I thought they wouldn't do any damage. When I woke up the next day BOTH tires were completely flat. So I pumped them back up to about 35PSI and in about 5 hours they were completely flat again. So I am thinking some of those thorn balls got pushed deep enough to puncture both tubes.

My question is should I replace the tubes or tubes and tires?
Because I am thinking what if there are some thorn bristles that are still poking through the inside of the tire when I get my new tubes. I don't want to have the same problem due to using the same tires and not getting all the thorns completely out.

I'm running Bontrager XR1 tires on my new bike.

Thanks in advance. Not looking to go tubeless at the moment.
 

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Ridin' Furry
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I hate those thorns. We call them Goathorns down where i live. You will more then likely have to replace the tubes if you got a bunch of them. Tubes are cheap enough. I normally patch tubes only if they got a single puncture and then use for "extreme" Spare.

I would look into puncture resistant tires and tape if you ride where this a lot of those suckers. Don't forget to check inside of your tires for thorns when replacing your tubes.
 

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Take the tubes out check the inside of the tire in case there is something that went through. Remove the thorn or whatever,and just change the tube.......With the dry season in effect it happens a lot....
 

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What I do is take the tire off the bike and rub the inside with something like a cloth towel or something. It will snag on any thorns still left in the tire and pull them out.

next take the tube and pump some air in it. Doesn't need to be alot but enough so it expands. Then submerge the tube under water. Either the whole thing or section by section (if using a small bucket). It will bubble where the holes are. Even the smallest hole will produce bubbles if its leaking. Do the whole tube including the valve stem. From here you can patch the holes in the tubes. I would get the glue patches and not the glue-less ones. Before I went tubless I always had problems with flat tires and would ride tubes with 5-10 patches on them. If done right patches hold up fine. The only patches I had problems with are the glue-less ones.

Also thicker tires resist thorns better, I only ran into flatting problems when I switched to light weight tires. Also tubeless with sealant or slime in your tubes really help with thorns if you have alot in your area.
 

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Goat heads,stickers, whatever you want to call them are a big problem down here in TX, I used to get a ton of them every time I went riding, and I never replaced a tube. I do however use the slime tubes and I NEVER pull the goat heads out. Occasionally I would have a flat, but I just air up the tire, give it a good couple of spins and I am off. Before I used the slime tubes I was repairing/replacing tubes numerous times a week, it got real old real fast.
 

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Goat heads is the term of preference here. No one has mentioned using tubes with slime, goo gone or a similar sealing product. I prefer this to super thick tires or protectors. Those items just make the wheels really heavy. Goat heads are small enough that 9 times out of 10 the slime or similar will seal the hole. Bear in mind that initially you may lose air, but if you remove the object, re-inflate and then ride a short while, it distributes the material along the inside of the tube and will seal small holes rather effectively. Sometimes this happens while riding and you won't even realize it. Sometimes I will find my tire deflated in the AM, I'll find a thorn, remove it, pump it up and head off to work. Most of the time, it holds.

As others mentioned, if you do have to remove the tire, you must feel the inside of is thoroughly to make sure no more objects are in there. Otherwise, you'll be doing the same thing in a short while.
 

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since 4/10/2009
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goat heads are these:



Sandburs are these:



similar problem, very different plant. sandburs are actually a type of grass. goatheads are obviously not grass, they are legumes. from what I've seen, goatheads seem to be a bigger problem for bike tires. I've had tons of sandburs sticking to my tires with nary a leak. the spurs on them don't seem long enough to completely penetrate the tire and tube.

sealant solves these problems. if you don't want to go tubeless (and honestly, with a bunch of preexisting holes in your tires from these, you're going to have a hard time sealing the tires up), just buy tubes with sealant in them already.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes. Curse those things. Especially when your front tire kicks them back at you and they get stuck in your clothes. :madmax:




goat heads are these:



Sandburs are these:



similar problem, very different plant. sandburs are actually a type of grass. goatheads are obviously not grass, they are legumes. from what I've seen, goatheads seem to be a bigger problem for bike tires. I've had tons of sandburs sticking to my tires with nary a leak. the spurs on them don't seem long enough to completely penetrate the tire and tube.

sealant solves these problems. if you don't want to go tubeless (and honestly, with a bunch of preexisting holes in your tires from these, you're going to have a hard time sealing the tires up), just buy tubes with sealant in them already.
 

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local trails rider
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I normally patch tubes only if they got a single puncture and then use for "extreme" Spare.
There's no particular reason to consider a patched tube an "extreme spare". I have tubes on my two main bikes that have been patched a couple of years ago. No problems.
 
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