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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hope will be offering disc brake spacers and new end caps to make existing 142 x 12 hubs fit into a Boost frame:

EB15: Hope Tech goes orange, shows new hubs, brakes, cassette and much more

Is there any reason why other companies can't do this? Mavic for example has all sorts of end caps for their Crossmax wheels - qr, 10x135, 12x142.

I'm looking at getting a new frame (a SC Bronson). It's a lot less expansive to keep my existing wheels (which I really like too) but because they're 142 that would mean getting the 2015 Bronson. The just-released version is Boost, as are many new frames.

It's a lot easier and less expensive to simply get a new frame, rather than frame and wheels. The rear Boost adapters would solve that.
 

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Cool idea about the adapters. But i thought boost was all about changing the hubs flange spacing for more bracing angle on the spokes.
It is, but I think many people (myself included) are skeptical of any real gains in stiffness it will provide and would like to use our "old" non-Boost wheelsets on Boost framesets.
 

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Another interesting tidbit ralated to this topic is a guy on the Specialized forum took a rear 148 boost wheel of a loaner 6Fattie and placed it in his Enduro 142+ dropouts just to see how much it wouldn't fit by. Surprise, it slid right in snugly with no forcing. Seems to be some chicanery involved with this new boost standard stuff at least from an untrained eye
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It may not be a permanent fix but as inonjoey said it would allow the use of existing wheelsets in new frames - and unfortunately there are many - that are only coming with Boost rears.
 

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What about cassette spacing?

The spacer corrects for the rotor, the end caps correct for the width, but the cassette will still be in the wrong spot?
Someone will come out with all of the correct crap to make it work, I'm sure. We are talking about 6mm of earth shattering, industry changing, performance multiplying radness, after all.

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Someone will come out with all of the correct crap to make it work, I'm sure. We are talking about 6mm of earth shattering, industry changing, performance multiplying radness, after all.

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
The cassette spacing (from the centerline of the bike) is wider with boost, but you can't space the freehub body out away from the hub shell, so converting a rear hub would would require pushing the whole hub 3mm to the DS to get the cassette where it needs to be, then space out the NDS with a 6mm longer endcap and a brake rotor spacer (6mm thick). And then, you'd need to re-dish the rim, moving it 3mm back towards the NDS to get it centered in the frame. Depending on the spoke lengths used for your wheel, you may or may not be able to redish it.

Converting a front hub, you could either leaving the hub shell in place and use 5mm longer endcaps on each side and a 5mm brake spacer, or you could move the hub 5mm to the NDS, use a 10mm longer DS end cap, and re-dish the rim.

Longer brake bolts with a spacer...eh, I don't like the sound of that personally.

None of these are ideal. I'd get new wheels to go with a new frame if it was Boost. The additional stiffness would be nice, and no rigged up longer brake bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The cassette spacing (from the centerline of the bike) is wider with boost, but you can't space the freehub body out away from the hub shell, so converting a rear hub would would require pushing the whole hub 3mm to the DS to get the cassette where it needs to be, then space out the NDS with a 6mm longer endcap and a brake rotor spacer (6mm thick). And then, you'd need to re-dish the rim, moving it 3mm back towards the NDS to get it centered in the frame. Depending on the spoke lengths used for your wheel, you may or may not be able to redish it.

Converting a front hub, you could either leaving the hub shell in place and use 5mm longer endcaps on each side and a 5mm brake spacer, or you could move the hub 5mm to the NDS, use a 10mm longer DS end cap, and re-dish the rim.

Longer brake bolts with a spacer...eh, I don't like the sound of that personally.

None of these are ideal. I'd get new wheels to go with a new frame if it was Boost. The additional stiffness would be nice, and no rigged up longer brake bolts.
Well Hope seems to be making it work.
Could be that they just go with 3mm end caps on either side and a 3mm spacer for the brake rotor.
Then leave the cassette where it is. Not ideal chainline but it would work.
Again, not as good as dedicated Boost wheels but allows you to use existing wheels in new Boost frames.
 

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The cassette spacing (from the centerline of the bike) is wider with boost, but you can't space the freehub body out away from the hub shell, so converting a rear hub would would require pushing the whole hub 3mm to the DS to get the cassette where it needs to be, then space out the NDS with a 6mm longer endcap and a brake rotor spacer (6mm thick). And then, you'd need to re-dish the rim, moving it 3mm back towards the NDS to get it centered in the frame. Depending on the spoke lengths used for your wheel, you may or may not be able to redish it.

Converting a front hub, you could either leaving the hub shell in place and use 5mm longer endcaps on each side and a 5mm brake spacer, or you could move the hub 5mm to the NDS, use a 10mm longer DS end cap, and re-dish the rim.

Longer brake bolts with a spacer...eh, I don't like the sound of that personally.

None of these are ideal. I'd get new wheels to go with a new frame if it was Boost. The additional stiffness would be nice, and no rigged up longer brake bolts.
Interesting. hadn't thought of it that way.

Super wide flange spacing is sometimes deemed awesome, but others (Bill Shook with American Classic, for example) have other thoughts on how to skin that cat.

The AM Classic MTB225 rear hub, for example, actually spaces the non-drive side hub flange inboard (away from the rotor, towards the center of the hub) for better dish and better balance of spoke tension (on a symmetrical rim).

Line Font Cylinder Transmission part Hub gear
 

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Boost hub hack

2 of these spacers (custom CNC'ed for a few bucks) on each side of the rear hub and 3mm of disc rotor spacers would let you use your current 142x12 hubs on a 148 Boosted rear triangle. You'll just have to adjust the RD 3mm further inward (works with Shimano 10 speed + 40T One-up cog). The standard Shimano disc bolts were long enough even with the rotor spacers.

Been on a few rides on this hack and no issues so far, even with a few hard climbs and heavy braking. Chainline remains the same, with a standard crankset.

Text Metal Circle Household hardware Aluminium
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Mingloid: this is exactly what I was talking about.
I figured the rotor spacers are not a big deal and the RD could handle the 3mm difference.
It was the end cap spacers for the hub I wondered about.
Would these simply slide into the dropouts and your existing hubs would fit?
 

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jon123, Yes! Their external diameter of 19mm would just fit into the recess in the frame. You'll have to hold them in place while sliding in the 148x12 axle. I put a dab of shoe-goo (or blu-tack / nail polish / loctite, etc) on the frame side of the spacers. The spacers would stay in place on the frame after that, so you don't have to fiddle with the spacers the next time you put your wheel on.

A 'not recommended' hack would be run run your 142x12 wheels directly on your 148 frame. The frame will flex inwards 3mm per side (which is hardly anything), and you'll need a 142 axle to clamp everything securely. I ran this for a weekend while waiting for the spacers to get done. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Mingloid: Brilliant!
I was thinking each manufacturer would have to make their own end caps. Like what Hope is doing.
Your solution is very clever. You should sell them - I'll be your first customer.
For me this is no small fix. I was going to go with my second choice for a new frame (HD3) because my first choice (new Bronson) has Boost. A) I like my wheels a lot and B) the Canadian dollar is terrible against the U.S. right now so getting a new frame AND wheel set was not ideal.
Thank you. Please keep us posted on how this is working out for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Mingloid: Do you think it's an issue or concern the end caps are not sitting in the dropouts? Just resting on the axle.
I don't know if it's possible for a 12mm thru axle to break but if it does the wheels are not secured in the dropouts.
 
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