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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the best way to minimize your chances of getting your wheels stolen when locked to a bike rack?

I am finishing building a bike for my son, and need to choose skewers. This will be ridden on trials with me 20% and ridden to school 80% and locked to the rack. I don't want the wheels to dissapear.

I was looking into security skewers (either allen wrench, or proprietary tool removal). The only thing is they seem like a MS Windows firewall. What self respecting bike thief will not be carrying a allen multi wrench???? Most of the reviews for the models with a proprietary wrench seemed like the user found it easy to strip the head of the skewer or loose the wrench.

Anyone here have something good to say for the anti-theft skewers? Model, where purchased from? Is there a good way to secure wheels other than taking the front off and locking it to the rear with a U lock?

Thanks
D
 

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Super Moderator
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dh1 said:
What is the best way to minimize your chances of getting your wheels stolen when locked to a bike rack?

I am finishing building a bike for my son, and need to choose skewers. This will be ridden on trials with me 20% and ridden to school 80% and locked to the rack. I don't want the wheels to dissapear.

I was looking into security skewers (either allen wrench, or proprietary tool removal). The only thing is they seem like a MS Windows firewall. What self respecting bike thief will not be carrying a allen multi wrench???? Most of the reviews for the models with a proprietary wrench seemed like the user found it easy to strip the head of the skewer or loose the wrench.

Anyone here have something good to say for the anti-theft skewers? Model, where purchased from? Is there a good way to secure wheels other than taking the front off and locking it to the rear with a U lock?

Thanks
D
These skewers might deter somebody a bit for a short stop...but multiple locks seem to be the "safest" bet...
 

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Do It Yourself
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The best way to keep your bike from getting stolen is to have something not worth stealing. For an on campus bike, spend a $100 on a real beater, the uglier the better (rattle can if you need to). Something functional but not pretty. And be sure to park it next to some frat boy's shiny new Cannondale Scalpel with full XTR.
 

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LA CHÈVRE
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A lot of people use standard quick release skewers but attach the QR lever to the frame/fork with a... not sure about the term but it's an adjustable collar that plumbers use. You can find them in most hardware stores for cheap and you just wrap it around the frame/fork and the QR lever and then tighten this with a wrench...

But I have to agree with Homebrew though, the best is to use a crappy bike, or at least a crappy-looking bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the feedback, but I think you missed my actual question

Homebrew said:
The best way to keep your bike from getting stolen is to have something not worth stealing. For an on campus bike, spend a $100 on a real beater, the uglier the better (rattle can if you need to). Something functional but not pretty. And be sure to park it next to some frat boy's shiny new Cannondale Scalpel with full XTR.
The bike isn't what I am worried about. The frame will be secured with a good lock. I was more concerned that theives or vandals may take off with whatever isn't bolted down. (wheels, seat, etc). Someone may break his kryptonite lock, but I doubt it.

The bike wont' be outside overnight, it will be garaged. During the day, it will be locked to the rack at the public school (not at campus yet). I am not really in the mode to look for a piece of crap to store in my garage for him to ride to school.. I have 5 kids and a wife. That means 3 bikes for me, one for my wife, one for son 1, one for son2, one for daughter, one for son3 and the little guy is still in tricycle years. 8 bikes and 2 tricycles...we don't have space to house junk bikes.

I just want to find the simplest way to secure the wheels, without investing in a disposeable set of wheels....so do these security or bolt on skewers work or not? that is my question. If they are just a gimmick, I will install regular QR skewers and have him run a cable through the frame and around the rims.

PS: Don't make fun of fraternity guys with Cannondales. I was a frat guy, and I ride cannondales...in fact, that is what I am building for my son;) .
 

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No. Just No.
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dh1 said:
I just want to find the simplest way to secure the wheels, without investing in a disposeable set of wheels
Well, I suppose I'm not answering your question either, but after removing the front wheel only I can usually get a single u-lock through the frame and both rims in conjunction with most bike racks or poles. No need for secure skewers then.
 

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i like rocks
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i ride every day in downtown chicago, i use hex key bolt on screwers and thus far its worked out just fine.
 

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viva la v-brakes!
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I have used allen-head bolt on skewers in several college towns and i have been fine. Just be careful of the Delta bolt on skewers. The threads on the Al nut tend to strip out, so replace them with a cheap steel nut right from the get-go and you'll be fine.
 
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