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Discussion Starter #1
I know this is a more limited group, but for any/ all Bluto adopters, where are you running your fork? I am having to drop my pressure way below recommended to get any good action out of the fork and get full travel. Even at 75psi, I get 15% sag and the fork feels super stiction-ey. Dropped it down to 65 to try later today. I'm 165- 170 all kitted up, so should be 100+ psi.
 

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Sure, now that I have the thing on order someone posts something negative. I'll be able to join in on this discussion on Saturday (maybe).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ha! Not negative- I've been super happy with it, but I am pretty picky about how my suspension feels. I've still only had it on maybe 4 rides (busy summer plus 2 other bikes that I regularly ride), but it feels stiffer than I want it to, and it looks like I'm only getting about 2/3 of my stroke. I'm going to put some slick honey on the stanchions and have it on a few more rides with lower pressure before I decide to tear it apart. Maybe it just needs to be broken in?
 

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What kind of trails and riding were you doing that required a lower than recommended type of pressure? Do you consider yourself to a casual rider who prefers soft suspension or an aggressive rider who prefers stiff suspension?


I rode my bluto for the first time last night, but just around the block a few times.

It seemed stictiony, but only like a new fork normally does. In my experience, it takes a few rides for fork bushings to loosen.

Also, turning the compression knob made a surprisingly huge difference in the typical push down on the bars test. Unfortunately I threw away the manual and can't find it online so it isn't clear exactly what that knob does within the fork.

I had to use slightly more pressure than recommended to get the desired stiffness. Instead of worrying about sag, I normally aim for a pressure that prevents bottoming except when something extreme happens. As the fork breaks in, it'll need some tweaking for sure. But for a starting point, I'm running 105psi for 160 pounds of rider and gear.
 

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My normal method of setting up a fork is like yours dfiler, I want to use all the travel when I am riding aggressively and don't want excessive bob when I'm pedaling. I'll start with the recommended psi and work my way to the right spot.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
dfiler- I'm a pretty aggressive rider. The trails I ride are chunky and techy, dry, Colorado front-range trails. I am pretty savvy to suspension, but this felt more stictiony than I thought- it very well could be that it just needs to break in, but with the fork at recommended PSI and the compression all the way open, it's tough to even compress the fork very far, and, like I said, I am only getting about 60% of my stroke.

The blue knob is your compression damper. Typically, the damper has oil flowing through it- either in an "open bath" or enclosed "bladder." Either way, the oil/ fluid is flowing through the damper assembly and through various ports. When the blue knob is all the way open (counter clockwise), it's allowing as much fluid to pass through those ports as possible. As you turn the knob clockwise, you are, in essence, closing off those ports, making it harder for the fluid to flow through and thus harder to compress the fork. All the way clockwise is "locked out" (though it will blow through if it needs to on a bigger hit to prevent damage to the fork). FixieDave hypothesized that it could be that some of these ports are clogged, but, again, I'll probably give it a bunch more rides before I take it apart- just wanted to see if anyone else was experiencing similar stuff.
 

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That's how I would describe compression damping as well. I'm interested in the specific type of valving but not enough to break the fork down before it needs service.

It will be interesting to see if your fork breaks in at all. I'll report back with my findings as well.
 

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if you let all the air out of the fork, can you compress it all the way? It could be overfilled with oil I've had this happen before where a fork is hyrdo-locked by too much fluid - after getting it back from a rebuild.
 

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Good suggestions Jisch.

I'd seen the service manual but was hoping that a user manual might contain additional info on damping/lockout. That service manual also depicts a gate valve which only applies to the Reba.

The reason for the interest is that there can be a big difference between forks. For example my manitou circus can be run with the compression knob set to lockout without fear of damaging the fork. It has blow off valving. The same is not true for the fox floats I've owned. I destroyed the lockout on a float by forgetting to unlock before sending a medium sized drop.
 

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Sounds like you're running too much air.

Recommended psi's are just that--recommended.

I weigh 15# more than you and I'm running 15psi less.

IMO, you need to dump some air before anything else.

Once the air spring feels right, then you can fiddle with air volume and damper adjustments.
 

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I weigh 240 and have 160 lbs of air 3 turns out on rebound and 4 bottomless tokens installed....also have changed to 80mm with an air tube from a SID...I'm also thinking about changing from 5wt to 7.5 just to see what happens
 

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I have only ridden my Fatboy with the Bluto around the yard, in my pump track and up and down a few curbs, hopefully I'll get it in the dirt tomorrow.

At first I kept letting air out because I wasn't getting the travel or the response I was hoping for. I checked the rebound and it was all the way slow (doh!). Speeding it up improved things dramatically - as someone else mentioned, that knob does a lot and when its too slow it prevents the fork from moving through its travel.
 

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A few rides on the bluto now... 115psi is working for me (160 pounds with gear). The o-ring shows I've been bottoming it but I haven't felt it behave like it was bottoming.
 

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Be sure to play with the air tokens, if you are not getting full travel try removing a token. The more tokens you have in the air side of your fork the more the air spring ramps up through the travel.

Also if you are really picky about your suspension, you can actually run the RCT3 damper in the Bluto over the stock damper. You will have to play around to find the right oil volumes though.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
^Wow- good to know about the RCT3 Damper- I LOVE my Pike. Amazing feel. I took out a token last night. FWIW, there were two installed on a 100mm Bluto. I'll try it out sometime later this week.
 

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It says in the manual you'll need 2 bottomless tokens and buy a new air shaft (part# 11.4018.026.015). Looks pretty straight forward.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
^^You could take your air shaft out, send it to me, and I'll send you my 100 shaft.
 

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Did my first real ride on my fatboy with the Bluto tonight. On the continuum of incremental to revolution change, it's somewhere in the middle. It was great to charge through rock gardens without worry. Catching air was awesome. Overall I'm very happy, it will take a few more rides to get it dialed. The best part is it didn't mess with the feel if the bike at all, I really didn't notice the weight or anything weird with the geometry.
 
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