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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm trying to build up a chainlove blur lt2(1 1/8" steerer) and I was really confused about some of the parts.

1) "Top swing" didn't seem to mean anything to the Jenson reps or their mechanic. They weren't entirely sure what I needed. I ended up getting part #FD272A02, Shimano XT FD-M770-10 Front derailleur, Dual Pull, Band Clamp, $35.

2) Cane Creek S3 headset. Jenson couldn't determine whether a blur lt2 needed an integrated headset or not. I was almost positive that SC bikes do not use integrated headsets.

3) I couldn't put together a complete XT 9 or 10 speed drive train with what Jensen had in stock. I ended up going with a 10 speed drivetrain with XTR shifters. I also had to get a long cage rear derailleur, when I had hoped for a mid cage rear derailleur. I was told a mid range will get ripped off the hanger if you happen to be in the big ring, and then you shift down to lower gears in the rear (for climbing) and mistakenly go all the up into the big cog (34T on my cassette), i.e. Big-Big. I'm a roadie, so I imagine I won't do that. Also, I would imagine that you can feel the chain getting really tight as you try to get into the last two cogs.

Jenson had a 2011 OE Fox 36 Talas RLC 1 1/8" in stock, as well as the 2012 Fox 36 Talas RLC. The OE fork had an uncut steerer. It did not have the Kashima coating on the stanchions, which I remember reading was normal for the OE forks. It also does not have the blue accent sticker on the fork legs, so the stickering is just black and white. I hemmed and hawed between the two forks, and I finally decided to save $280, and get the cheaper fork.

I weigh 230 lbs, and the ONE thing I wanted to make sure I ended up with was a 36 hole wheelset--but I couldn't find any 36 hole hubs in stock anywhere. So I'm having some 32 hole Hadleys(front: 20mm TA, rear: 10mm x 135mm through bolt) built up locally with Stan's Flow rims and straight gauge spokes. Now I wish I had ordered the Stan's Flow wheelset at Jensen for $515 and saved $200. I read some bad things about the Stans hubs on these forums, so I was hesitant. Then I talked to a Jensen mechanic, and he said the Stan's hubs on that wheelset are great.

I still need brakes. I'm thinking of getting the Avid BB7 mechanical brake package for $120 at Bluesky. I passed on Bluesky's XT brake kit sale, which included the new M785's, resin pads, 160/180 front rotor, 160 rear rotor, and adapters all for $250(sale ended) because of some leaking problems I read about on these forums.

I'm not very flexible, and to be comfortable on a road bike, I need the handlebars even with the saddle. I'm going to attempt to replicate that setup on my LT2. Is it better to use, say a 10 degree stem and high rise bars to get the bars up, or clamp a stem higher up on the steerer and use a 6 degree stem and low/mid rise bars?

This will be my first mtb build. I bought a Park BB wrench, and I have tools for building up road bikes. I'll have the headset installed at a shop--unless there is an easy way to do it myself. Any tips?
 

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1. I think you'll be fine here. Top swing to clear the lower link moving up, so if your cable is being pull on the top of the front mech, no worries

2. No, they don't use integrated HS. Like a King InSet is a standard HS that mounts flush to the head tube, such that the bearings sit inside the head tube. For my BLTc, I run a King Mixed Taper InSet.

3. For the LTc, the long cage actually affords more room between the stay and where the chain comes off the (middle) ring. I run a 2x9+bashy on a standard 3 ring crank. So w/ a 32T mid ring, the long cage was good.
I've never felt a chain getting tight. So, I dial my derailleur swing on the stand, because I can/have gotten into situation where I just shift and flex the mech to unnatural looking angles.

Fork: Ya know, I have an older '07 36 Float and it feels WAY better than my '11 32 Float w/ Kashima. The only thing is the TALAS will feel sticker because of the seals. I can see where Kashima will help here, but honestly, I think you'll be fine.

Brakes: I run the Elixir CRs and can remember the public praise when they were first release, and then the more recent bashing of howling and MC failures. All I have to say here is mine haven't broken and don't howl, and mine are from the problematic year.
Don't skimp on brakes in terms of adjustments. I've found the ergo at the bar is REALLY important in my ride comfort...single finger w/ minimum reach that pulls almost all the way to the bar.

I'm 6ft w/ 33" inseam. Like you, I try to run an even bar/seat height. My stem is a 90mm 10 degree Thomson w/ a Race Face SixC 725mm bar and 3/4" rise, and a Reverb post w/ a WTB Rocket V SLT. Now, w/ the Reverb burried as deep as it can go in the frame, I need to drop the seat about an inch into its max extension to get my ideal position. But hey, that's why the dropper is so cool :) If I had my druthers, I'd permanently reduce the Reverb's travel by an inch...but then I heard RS will make them for this coming year...yeppie!

Tools: Do you have a torque wrench? I've been finding that if you use proper torque specs, your bike will actually remain silent...amazing huh? ;) And, I've been trying to impress this point to people for a while now...DON'T USE GREASE on things that don't constantly rotate, USE ANTI-SEIZE COMPOUND! The stuff is a helluva lot more tenacious than grease. Slap this stuff on all your threads (except for the ones where you should use Loctite), and your torque spec will be more accurate when using your torque wrench.

**NOTE: these comments are based off of an aluminum Nomad MK1, BLTc, several carbon, steel and Ti road bikes, and a handful of aluminium DH bikes. Your mileage may vary :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1) Sorry, I can't understand what you mean. I need to know how to tell if a front derailleur is "top swing", and in particular whether the front derailleur I bought is top swing. I don't understand why SC uses the term "top swing", but none of the Shimano derailleurs say the are top swing.

2) You seem to be describing an integrated headset.

3) Are you saying that a Blur LT2 won't work with a mid cage rear derailleur? Or, are you saying it is harder to set it up, so there's no front derailleur rub? I thought with a mid cage the shifting would be crisper and there would be less chain slap, hence if you don't anticipate screwing up and shifting into the biggest cog while in the big ring, a mid cage was the way to go.
 

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Sorry, I can't understand what you mean. I need to know how to tell if a front derailleur is "top swing", and in particular whether the front derailleur I bought is top swing. I don't understand why SC uses the term "top swing", but none of the Shimano derailleurs say the are top swing.
You're derailleur is a dual pull. It will work for both top or bottom pull applications. For the Blur the cable comes down directly to the pinch bolt, tightened w/ a 5mm hex. Top swing / top pull, same thing.

You seem to be describing an integrated headset
The Blur uses external cups. At least the 1 1/8 straight head tubed frames that CL sold. Not sure about the current tapered HTs.

Are you saying that a Blur LT2 won't work with a mid cage rear derailleur
It's not the frame that determines what size RD you'll need, but the length of chain, which in turn is determined by the gears. I'm running a 22/36 2x9 with a med cage. The bigger rings on your 10 spd requires more chain, so keep the long cage
 

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1) Sorry, I can't understand what you mean. I need to know how to tell if a front derailleur is "top swing", and in particular whether the front derailleur I bought is top swing. I don't understand why SC uses the term "top swing", but none of the Shimano derailleurs say the are top swing.

2) You seem to be describing an integrated headset.

3) Are you saying that a Blur LT2 won't work with a mid cage rear derailleur? Or, are you saying it is harder to set it up, so there's no front derailleur rub? I thought with a mid cage the shifting would be crisper and there would be less chain slap, hence if you don't anticipate screwing up and shifting into the biggest cog while in the big ring, a mid cage was the way to go.
1. "Top Swing" isn't a SC term. Okay, here's to check to see if your front mech will work:
Measure the diameter of your largest chain ring. Bolt on the front mech so the out plate is 1/2 this distance from the BB center. Remove the shock bolt at the link, rotate it out ofthe way, and cycle the rear. If the frame interferes w/ the mech in any way, it won't work.

2. An "integrated" headset has machining in the head tube so you can just put in a cartridge bearing w/a conical base...no pressing necessary. An integrated HS doesn't require a HS cup. What I described is called an InSet by Chris King, and it requires a bearing cup to be pressed into the frame. If the headtube is tapered, You can get a King Mixed Tapered which will get you an ext lower bearing and an InSet upper. With HS, when in doubt, break out a mic and refer to Chris Kings head tube diameter chart for guidance.

3. Not what I said. Just keep your long and don't stress w/ "crisp" or chain slap. If you really want crisp, go w/ X0. and just wrap your stay w/ some marine electrical rubber tape (3M) to quiet the chain slap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok. I'll keep the long cage. I think the med cage would work better, but I don't have time to source one. I'll look for some anti-seize. I saw some Locktite 767 (anti seize) at an LBS and it looks pretty cool. I have no idea where to acquire it, though.
 

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I'll look for some anti-seize...I have no idea where to acquire it, though.
Automotive parts store like Checkers or Autozone. For $12-$15, you can get a bottle that will last you a life-time! :thumbsup: I bought an 8 or 12oz bottle 10 years ago, and it's still 90% full...HAHA!

Use this stuff where you don't want parts to "bond" to each other by swapping electrons. This stuff isn't used to reduce friction like grease, but it does have a bit of lubricating value.,,at places like threads or between Ti rails saddles and aluminum seatpost clamps. And, a little goes a LONG ways w/ this stuff!
 

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I'll check my local Autozone for the anti-seize. What about putting it on BB threads and seat posts?
Oh hellz yeah! Slap it one the BB threads for sure. Remember, a dollop goes a long ways...

If you have a carbon frame, use carbon paste for the seatpost no matter what material the post is (a torque wrench is important here). If aluminum frame w/ aluminum post, anti-seize. If aluminum frame w/ a carbon post, carbon paste (a torque wrench is important here).

FYI, I also like using carbon paste up at the (carbon) handlebar for lock-on grips, shifties, and brake mounts...also stem if it doesn't already have a rough patch.

Bottom line, carbon has shi++y compression/crush resistance because the resin will NEVER be as hard as aluminum. Use carbon paste to increase friction, and torque everything to spec and avoid over torquing.

From Autozone: Permatex/8 oz. (226.8 g.) anti-seize lubricant (80078) | Lube | AutoZone.com...smaller tubes down below.
 
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