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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm currently blowing out the rear DU bushing about every 2 weeks, and it's getting very bothersome. I have read ALL the previous threads about this, and there seems to be 2 theories on how to tighten the linkage axle:

1. follow the torque specs on the tech sheet
2. tighten the bolt until the reducer DOES NOT move with the shock (per sc tech guy)

Anybody had drastically better luck with one of these methods over the other?

On a similar note, it should be hilarious to see how du bushing sales escalate with the 19 new VPP bikes that SC is rolling out.
 

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Gittyup!
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Ya... those things are a pain in the arse aren't they? This may have no relevance to your situation at all, but I just got a rebuild kit for the pivots on my Superlight. The rear included a DU bushings that were entirely different from the old system (so much so that I emailed SC to tell them they sent me the wrong hardware... which I soon found out wasn't the case). Instead of the 2 reducers on each side that slide into the shock eyelet, the new system involved a smooth bore shaft that is inserted through the shock eyelet and extends out on both sides. The new "reducers" (effectively "spacers" via this new system) simply slid over this shaft and employ 2 rubber gaskets to keep the dirt out. This way there is much less opportunity for play within the eyelet as it is one solid piece rather than 2. They say this system is more reliable and much longer lasting than the old reducer system.

Your Blur may already employ this method and this is all old news to you. If so, sorry for the wasted bandwidth!

Dusty Bottoms said:
I'm currently blowing out the rear DU bushing about every 2 weeks, and it's getting very bothersome. I have read ALL the previous threads about this, and there seems to be 2 theories on how to tighten the linkage axle:

1. follow the torque specs on the tech sheet
2. tighten the bolt until the reducer DOES NOT move with the shock (per sc tech guy)

Anybody had drastically better luck with one of these methods over the other?

On a similar note, it should be hilarious to see how du bushing sales escalate with the 19 new VPP bikes that SC is rolling out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A little more info

Josh at SC was nice enough to call me yesterday to discuss the DU bushing issue on the Blur. He says that the DU bushing is often NOT failed when it feels like it is. He explained that the DU has failed when the reducers practically fall out upon shock removal. If the reducers fit snuggly in the DU, then the DU is fine.

He said the problem(most of the time)is that the frame & linkage often compress a fraction of an inch over time, and the shock/pivot axle becomes TOO LONG to pinch it all together. This can be remedied by shaving a mm off the axle. He said if you can turn the axle with a hex wrench on ONE side, then it's not pinching together properly.

Josh also confirmed that the reducers should NOT move with the shock through it's cycle. You can check this by unbolting the front of the shock and moving the shock as if it were cycling.

I'll shave down that axle and see what happens.
 

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Tear it all out!
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That is weird as the original DU bushing in my 04 Fox RL Big Volume lasted just under a year before I noticed play. I hope the one I installed lasts just as long.
 

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Tracking up the place
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Could somebody post a pic of what they are talking about :

"the rear included a DU bushings that were entirely different from the old system (so much so that I emailed SC to tell them they sent me the wrong hardware... which I soon found out wasn't the case). Instead of the 2 reducers on each side that slide into the shock eyelet, the new system involved a smooth bore shaft that is inserted through the shock eyelet and extends out on both sides. The new "reducers" (effectively "spacers" via this new system) simply slid over this shaft and employ 2 rubber gaskets to keep the dirt out. This way there is much less opportunity for play within the eyelet as it is one solid piece rather than 2. They say this system is more reliable and much longer lasting than the old reducer system"
 
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