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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm having trouble climbing really steep technical sections. The front end/fork has a tendancy of being really light and lifts off the ground. To keep the weight on the front wheel, I have a 120 mm Thomsone stem installed upside down, and some rather long bar ends - but nothing helps. I used to be able to climb them no problem on my Klein Mantra (so it's not the rider :). I have a fox float RLC 100, would an 80mm fork lower the front?
 

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If you can try sliding the saddle forward in the rail clamps or even tilt it down slightly so to put less weight on the back wheel, assuming this is when you're in the saddle as opposed to an out of saddle climb. Are you running riser bars or flats?

Generally an 80mm fork will lower the front, measure the axle to crown height of your existing fork if you start shopping around so you can compare.
 

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Really_Fat_Bastard said:
So I'm having trouble climbing really steep technical sections. The front end/fork has a tendancy of being really light and lifts off the ground. To keep the weight on the front wheel, I have a 120 mm Thomsone stem installed upside down, and some rather long bar ends - but nothing helps. I used to be able to climb them no problem on my Klein Mantra (so it's not the rider :). I have a fox float RLC 100, would an 80mm fork lower the front?
Have you compared your riding position on the Mantra to your position on the Blur? That would be a good place to start. In addition to position....sometimes a lower handlebar position will make climbing more difficult if your technique is not good. While climbing steep sections, you want to be pulling back and down on the bars.....not up.

An 80mm fork will lower the front end, but it shouldn't be necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Tried all of the above. I have a flat bar, my stem is inverted, I moved the seat forward and down, and my riding technique is decent. Steep hills aren't a problem when smooth, but when I'm climbing through a steep rock bed and my fork hits a rock, it goes 'boing', lifts up, and I unclip. After 2-3 tries, I'm ready to throw my bike off a cliff. I like climbing more than descending (which the Blur does very well), but I wonder if I should get a different ride. Is it Ebay time?
 

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Ya know, it's really funny (not ha ha funny, but funny nonetheless) to read your post. I noticed the exact OPPOSITE thing when switching from a SL to the Blur. The blur has about a 1/2" longer chainstay than the superlight, so seated climbing became a breeze. On the SL I'd have to get intimate with the nose of my saddle to keep the front wheel down, but on the blur I just sit in my normal position, drop my upper body and pedal away. Now, the downside it that it's climbs a bit funny out of the saddle; I need to take a more unnatural rear-ward position to maintian traction.
 

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I'd have someone check it out for you, because there is nothing wrong with the way the Blur climbs. Seat position and fork compression/rebound would be good things to double check. Also remember its a different bike, so it will require different technique from your Klein...maybe it will take some getting used to.
 

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Try ETA

Really_Fat_Bastard said:
So I'm having trouble climbing really steep technical sections. The front end/fork has a tendancy of being really light and lifts off the ground. To keep the weight on the front wheel, I have a 120 mm Thomsone stem installed upside down, and some rather long bar ends - but nothing helps. I used to be able to climb them no problem on my Klein Mantra (so it's not the rider :). I have a fox float RLC 100, would an 80mm fork lower the front?
Sounds like a job for a zoke with ETA (Marathon probably). That'd lower the geometry 2-3 inches instead of 1. That or a beefier front tire (much cheaper but definately not as effective).
 

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because your mantra has really long chainstays....as the suspension compresses, the chainstays grow in length counteracting some of the rearward weight shift. Same thing happens on my bullit to a lesser extent. I love the way my bullit climbs techy stuff. The blur has chainstay growth also, but nowhere near what you'd get on the mantra.

It's going to come down to adjusting your technic. You'll need more body english with the blur than you ever needed with the mantra to make the same climbs.

-Sp

Really_Fat_Bastard said:
So I'm having trouble climbing really steep technical sections. The front end/fork has a tendancy of being really light and lifts off the ground. To keep the weight on the front wheel, I have a 120 mm Thomsone stem installed upside down, and some rather long bar ends - but nothing helps. I used to be able to climb them no problem on my Klein Mantra (so it's not the rider :). I have a fox float RLC 100, would an 80mm fork lower the front?
 

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spinjocky said:
Sounds like a job for a zoke with ETA (Marathon probably). That'd lower the geometry 2-3 inches instead of 1. That or a beefier front tire (much cheaper but definately not as effective).
ETA works great for fairly smooth climbs. On technical climbs (this case), it's not good. The ETA works by locking out rebound. All you have is a compressed fork with a really tight spring. If you hit a rock, it will bounce off of it...no rebound to slow it down.

The original poster specifically mentiond that when he hits a rock, his fork bounce up....ETA won't solve that issue.

I really think it's probably a combination of bike setup / technique.
 

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Try changing your technique..

It's going to come down to your technique, initially when I got my Blur I had some difficulty cleaning steep technical climbs I was able to clean with my old single-pivot bike.

The Blur's rear stiffens as you push on the pedal and the rear wheel that's rolling over an obstacle will need your help by shifting your weight forward, sometimes standing, all depending on your rear wheel traction. On loose terrain, I'll try to stay seated and keep my butt on the saddle's nose and I clean the climb with enough momentum... You'll need to spin with just enough speed and control to lunge you over the obstacle. You don't need much upper body english, just know when to shift your weight forward or back.

I went thru trial and error climbing the tech steep stuff, at first I thought the VPP was all hype, but once you understand the pivot it's actually faster at getting you to the top.

On a friend's FSR, I can stay seated and spin, but also noticed it squats and bobs more resulting in less energy transfer to propel me forward quicker.. Just my opinion but I hope it answered some questions for you.
 

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Blue Shorts said:
ETA works great for fairly smooth climbs. On technical climbs (this case), it's not good. The ETA works by locking out rebound. All you have is a compressed fork with a really tight spring. If you hit a rock, it will bounce off of it...no rebound to slow it down.

The original poster specifically mentiond that when he hits a rock, his fork bounce up....ETA won't solve that issue.

I really think it's probably a combination of bike setup / technique.
Fox has a new fork out it is just as soft at 3 inches as it is at 5 inches I have seen it in action and it is true
 
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