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Sorry for the 'nu-bee' question, but what is it used on and for, and where do you get it? I thought grease and lube and tightening to spec was enough. If you use it on any bike bolts, do they torque out without breakage? TIA, Tom
 

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blue loctite

p0Ke'[email protected] said:
Sorry for the 'nu-bee' question, but what is it used on and for, and where do you get it? I thought grease and lube and tightening to spec was enough. If you use it on any bike bolts, do they torque out without breakage? TIA, Tom
Blue is medium strength, appropriate for screws and bolts you don't want coming loose. You can still loosen them with a wrench, it's not permanent. Thing about anaerobic threadlock compounds, the more thread area it's applied to, the stronger it holds. So, while I know some people do this, I wouldn't recommend using blue strength on stuff with a lot of thread surface, like bottom bracket cups. That's what weak loctite is for, LocTite calls is #222 I believe, it's purple.
My local Wallyworld sells a blue threadlock compound that's equivalent to LocTite blue. Most any decent hardware store or auto supply place should have either the actual brand name LocTite or some other equivalent brand of blue/medium. For the purple, or the green sleeve retainer that LocTite makes, you gotta find a place that carries the LocTite brand.
Heat will loosen threadlock compounds, including the sleever retainers, which you should never use on threads you'll be wanting to loosen someday. But if you screw up you can apply heat with a soldering iron to get the parts apart again.
 

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p0Ke'[email protected] said:
Sorry for the 'nu-bee' question, but what is it used on and for, and where do you get it? I thought grease and lube and tightening to spec was enough. If you use it on any bike bolts, do they torque out without breakage? TIA, Tom
Loctite #242 is generally refered to as "blue loctite" and is a medium strength removeable threadlocker. However, there are other loctite products which are blue as well. It's used to lock bolts, screws, and nuts from loosening.

You can get it online www.mcmaster.com or most auto parts stores or hardware stores.

Grease and lube and tightening to spec "should" be enough. I've never had to use loctite on my bike. However, in real life, sometimes things don't always work as they should. Parts can be made out of spec, or be worn. This is where threadlockers come in handy. And also they can be used for extra "feel better" insurance. You're pretty sure that pedal is tight, but you'd "feel better" if it were loctited on.

If you use the proper loctite, with the proper size/type fastener, they won't break when unthreading.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for.....

The threads on threads (pun intended). Soon as I start doing my own repairs....the more money I'll have for parts ;) I guess my bottom line question is......where on the bike does it make sense to use Loctite regularly :confused:
 

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p0Ke'[email protected] said:
The threads on threads (pun intended). Soon as I start doing my own repairs....the more money I'll have for parts ;) I guess my bottom line question is......where on the bike does it make sense to use Loctite regularly :confused:
I don't use loctite anywhere on my bike. So I guess the answer would be nowhere.
 

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Reviewer/Tester
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I use blue loctite on the threads on my VT-2 in the rear suspension bolts. You do NOT want these to come loose because they will quickly hammer the bushes out of round, causing damage and failure.

I use blue loctite on the lever adjusting screws on both brake levers.

Just a couple of examples for you... :)


R.
 

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83 feet less per minute
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OK, I've got blue loc-tite. Should I paint it on the suspension bolt threads and let it dry before installing the bolt or should I paint it on and install the bolt, letting it dry in place. Several bolts I've received with brake parts already have the loc-tite dried on the threads.
Thanks
 

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not loctite

the stuff you have seen dried on uninstalled bolts is some type of anti vibration compound. i have seen it on race face's bb cups for instance. this is different than loctite. loctite is applied and then tightened while wet. happy wrenching.
 

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Tater Like'um Bike Ridez!
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loctite on my cassette??!!! oh yea.

Personally I like to put a dab of loctite onto every SRAM cassette I buy. The only prob. I've ever had with these cassettes is that tiny little allen screw that holds the body together will come out after a few hundred miles and start to destroy my spokes, etc. I take my new cassette, remove that little bastard, and then reinstall it with a dab of loctite on the threads. This prevents it from deciding to relocate whilst I ride. Saves u the hassel of taking everything apart now and then to make sure it's still secure. :)
 

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Seatposts

Ullrite said:
Personally I like to put a dab of loctite onto every SRAM cassette I buy. The only prob. I've ever had with these cassettes is that tiny little allen screw that holds the body together will come out after a few hundred miles and start to destroy my spokes, etc. I take my new cassette, remove that little bastard, and then reinstall it with a dab of loctite on the threads. This prevents it from deciding to relocate whilst I ride. Saves u the hassel of taking everything apart now and then to make sure it's still secure. :)
My LBS guys also recomend brushing blue loctite on carbon fiber seatposts to prevent slipping.That's what I do with mine,never had a problem on my Bontrager Carbon post.(not sure I would have a problem anyway,but I hear Easton Carbon Fiber tends to slip)
 

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ballbuster
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I use it on a bunch of stuff

Like pedal threads. Not only does it keep the pedal from backing out under less tightening torque, it keeps it from siezing. This is good if you swap pedals around as much as I do.

I also use it on suspension bolts, and Disc brake bolts. Basically, important stuff that is likely to shake loose.

Again, not only does it keep bolts from shaking loose, it keeps them from siezing.

I like the newer 'chapstick' tube style loctite rather than liquid. It doesn't spill, and is easier to apply in small amounts on small bolts.
 

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In case it has not been mentioned, use extreme caution when using the blue stuff on smaller bolts (like the 2mm lever reach adjust screws on Hayes levers) I've ruined these in the past trying to move them afterward. Better to go with the purple stuff mentioned above on tiny stuff.
 

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The Riddler
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Pedal threads
BB Threads (no problems yet)
Disc Rotor Bolt Threads
I have used them for these three applications and they work awesome. Trust me, all it takes is for the pedal to come out once during a race and realize that it has completley stripped the crank arm in the process to want to loctice em down. The loctite on the discs is a safety precaution. As for the BB, i used it in lieu of the plumbers tape and it worked out fine. I find BB cups hard to get out under any situation.
 

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Down South Yooper
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I've used it on:

Some really persistent BB cup creaks, although I've seen it remove some of the shell material upon removal, if you use too much.

Crank bolts, again on persistent looseners.

Small bolts, like reach adjusters.

Threaded headset rings, although these have gone the way of the dodo.

Typically, I try grease first now, it seems to prevent most creaks, and with proper tightening, rarely do they come loose. But I keep a small tube, just in case.

Plum
 
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