Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 66 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am preparing to upgrade my fork on my Raleigh. It currently has a Suntour XCT. Over time the black wore off of the bottom of the stanchion tubes. I never lubricated them, so that may be the problem. My Cannondale has a RS Recon with gold stanchions which look a little more durable.
My choices in fork are a Suntour Epicon from 08 or one from 09. The 08 model has black and the 09 model has gold stanchions. The 09 is more expensive, but the only reason I would get it is because of the gold. If I properly care for the fork (i.e. lube it according to the manufacturer's specs) can I avert the black rubbing off? Or is it inevitable?
Please don't try to talk me into a higher end name brand. The bike is mainly for neighborhood riding (since the new fork will have lock out) and friends to ride with me on light trails. I ride my Cannondale on the trails. I just want an upgrade over the low end model...plus the Epicon got great reviews from MTBR members!
Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
316 Posts
The black and gold is just annodizing and will wear over time if the fork isn't properly serviced and lubed. It is inevitable and will happen just much, much slower if properly taken care of.
If you want a gold stanction, go with a gold stanction. It is personal preference.
 

·
mbtr member
Joined
·
6,503 Posts
get a tora 318- steel stanchions will never wear out and it has a decent damper w/ lockout. Cost is about the same on sale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So the gold is just as susceptible as the black to wearing off? That will definitely affect my decision making.
Thanks for your concern boomn, although I asked people not to suggest forks other than those I decided on. I have already thought about a rigid and decided against.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
316 Posts
rweakley said:
So the gold is just as susceptible as the black to wearing off? That will definitely affect my decision making.
Thanks for your concern boomn, although I asked people not to suggest forks other than those I decided on. I have already thought about a rigid and decided against.
It is just the color anodizing that the company chooses to put on the stanctions. It will wear off if the fork is not serviced and maintained on a proper schedule. If properly maintained you shouldn't have much of a problem at all. That shouldn't be a big part of your decision making unless you plan on neglecting your fork again.
 

·
Old man on a bike
Joined
·
12,399 Posts
rweakley said:
Thanks, but why don't you check out the reviews of that particular fork here before passing judgment.
Well, this from a guy who thought the color of the stanchion was an issue? :rolleyes: People love cheap forks that don't work well, reviews from same don't mean much. For the type of riding you mentioned a rigid fork would be a better choice. YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,903 Posts
you should go re-read the reviews again.. they're not from experienced people.. a few of them even stated that its their first air fork. they dont know any better.

you can believe whatever you want, but thats not a good fork and you're going to shell out your hard earned money for it.

are you trying to convince us, or yourself?
 

·
i call it a kaiser blade
Joined
·
744 Posts
believe what you want, but a budget air fork is vastly inferior to the stability and reliability of a quality rigid fork bought for the same price (or even less).

SR suntour is the OEM on low end bikes for a reason. their components aren't very good.

it's your money.

you said what kind of riding you do and what kind of fork would best suit you. and i say rigid steel. just like with a steel hardtail bike the metal soaks up bumps incredibly well and maintains stability on some really harsh terrain, or curbs if you like.

i used to ride a zion 29er with a surly fork down stairwells.
 

·
~Disc~Golf~
Joined
·
16,496 Posts
not bashin' ya bro

rweakley - I don't understand what kind of answer you are looking for.
You stated that you did not want any thing high-end.
You also said that you would be riding around the neighborhood with this bike and would be using the lockout. You have your Cannondale for trail riding.
And yet, when someone provides you with a a reasonable alternative (rigid fork), you get defensive and/or accusatory.
The posters above me pretty much know what they're talkin' about and given your proposition, answered appropriately. If you're set on getting one of the forks you mentioned, by all means get one! The deciding factors (as it appears to me) are; A - color, and B - cost. Pick one that you like.

The reviews have to be taken with a grain of salt. People rate stuff that they absolutely love or hate -in general. You'll find some reviews that are genuinely unbiased and you need a discerning eye to find those. On 'higher' rated products, the first reviews I look at are the lower to middle of the road reviews so I am not swayed by fanboys or haters (that's just me tho). As the quality of parts go up, the reviews tend to be more 'accurate' IMO ---and I AM GENERALIZING

I'll stop now:p
I too vote for a nice (suspension-corrected) rigid - my $.06
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,903 Posts
ive found that searching the forums is about 1000000x more useful than the reviews. the reviews are good for finding quick weights and things..

lots of bike parts are VERY setup dependent, its hard to get a straight review.. you never know who the person is, or how they ride, or even if their bike is working correctly. ive seen people slam xc gear beacause it broke dirt jumping! it skews the ratings..
 

·
Old man on a bike
Joined
·
12,399 Posts
rweakley said:
I didn't claim to be an expert. But out of 14 people, the fork got an average 4.71 stars on this website. So every one of them must be an idiot that loves cheap crap?
Trust me, you're not coming off as any sort of expert...

I haven't bothered with the mtbr reviews in years, many people (and not necessarily forum members at all) post just on brand name alone, don't get the model or year correctly so hard to read a lot into them. When you see something get a rave or a knock it can be interesting, but people who are happy with their purchase are often too enthusiastic, and those that feel burned in some way are the opposite, and many satisfied users don't say anything at all...

Take your chances on a Suntour fork if you want, let us know how it works out. A rigid fork sounds better all around for your purposes and budget.
 

·
~Disc~Golf~
Joined
·
16,496 Posts
tomsmoto said:
ive found that searching the forums is about 1000000x more useful than the reviews. the reviews are good for finding quick weights and things..

lots of bike parts are VERY setup dependent, its hard to get a straight review.. you never know who the person is, or how they ride, or even if their bike is working correctly. ive seen people slam xc gear beacause it broke dirt jumping! it skews the ratings..
DOH!! - Thanks Tomato! ( :p ) - I meant to include that very sentiment! :madman: :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·


Ok, assuming that you are all fairly experienced riders, I will assume you are all collectively right. If I do go rigid which of the styles above will still allow me to continue using the bike for trail riding? I still take the bike out on trails on which the terrain is not too rough where a hardtail is more appropriate, and my friends ride it when we ride together.

Now keeping this in mind...I am in the Marines. Currently I am stationed in Houston, where there is no base and the local trails are flat. Memorial Park is good but the guys I ride with there have their own bikes. Anyways, I will be transferred to Virginia in a year or so and then to Pensacola, Florida six months later. Most bases have some really good trails. I want a bike that I can let my friends ride that can handle these trails. Would you still recommend a rigid or should I just save for a while to get a more decent suspension fork?

I know that was a mouthful. But I do want to spend my money wisely.
 

·
Old man on a bike
Joined
·
12,399 Posts
I wouldn't worry about the aesthetics of the rigid fork design as much as making sure the fork size is appropriate for the geometry of the bike it's being put on. Don't know anything about which Raleigh you've got, so hard to say what you should be looking at specifically. You basically want to make sure the axle to crown measurement on the fork is suitable for the frame's design. There will be some minor ride characteristics differences among the rigid forks, but I'd go with a steel fork for price, feel and durability.

I rode rigid mountain bikes in a wide variety of terrain for years (there wasn't anything else), I'm just an old fart now and like my suspension more these days, so I leave my rigid bike riding for the road. Your friends and yourself, being relatively young and fit since you're in the service should enjoy the challenge of the rigid fork, it's better for your skills in any case and for the areas you're riding shouldn't be a problem at all (heck, you might even end up swapping rides with the guys once in a while). Some of the best riders I know ride single speed fully rigid bikes, would think a Marine would be up for the challenge...
 
1 - 20 of 66 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top