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Just started riding a bike from wally world (hey it was free...) was looking at purchasing a new one but was wondering what is considered heavy for an XC bike? Is 30lbs heavy for an XC bike?
 

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Former Bike Wrench
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Depends on type and price

BikeWalker said:
Just started riding a bike from wally world (hey it was free...) was looking at purchasing a new one but was wondering what is considered heavy for an XC bike? Is 30lbs heavy for an XC bike?
Your question is lacking a lot of details so I will try and cover them all

-30lbs is OK for a $600 XC Hardtail
-30lbs is light for a sub $1200 XC Full Suspension
-30lbs is a little heavy for a $1000 XC Hardtail
-30lbs is about average if not a bit heavy for a $1500 XC Full Suspension
-30lbs is quite heavy for a $2500 XC Hardtail
-30lbs is still a wee bit heavy for a $3000 XC Full Suspension
-30lbs is quite heavy for a $4500 XC Full Suspension

Unless your planning on racing, don't get too caught up in the weight weenie game (unless you got serious $$$ to blow). I ride a 5" travel All Mountain full suspension that weighs 32lbs yet my 26lbs XC Hardtail mostly collects dust because my 32lbs bike is WAY more fun to ride.

Hope this helps
 

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Former Bike Wrench
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Ride more important than weight

You can certainly compare the weight of a few different brands, but concentrate on how well the bike feels when you ride it. A pound here or there won't make a difference in the overall enjoyment of riding (again, I ride my heavier bike 90% of the time, because its more comfortable and more fun to ride).

Even if you look at the elite pro XC racers, some will ride 25lbs full suspension bikes while others ride sub 22lbs hardtails. It comes down to what you like best...pretty much everything you look at in your price range is gonna be around $30lbs give or take a couple pounds. If you see something way less (like 26lbs) in that price range...then they are cutting corners somewhere (a lot of mail order bikes like Motobecane do this) such as putting paper thin tires that offer little to no traction and wear out very quickly (and also get lots of flats). You don't want this...now you won't be having fun.

Good Luck

PS-
A couple of bikes I'd recommend are the Kona Kikapu and the KHS XC204. Both are solid designs and have quality parts and disc brakes.:thumbsup:
 

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You should keep hardtails under 30 pounds.. anything above will be NOT fun to ride.

Full suspension differs for some reason. Lots of people can handle a 40 lb bike like a 33 lb bike because the geometry, frame design, pivots, shocks are so many factors that go into ride quality.
 

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Double-metric mtb man
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I'll agree....the most important part is how it works for you. Get what you need and what fits, then worry about weight if it is really a factor. If you get serious into racing, you'll be wanting a race bike anyway.

In general, XC oriented bikes will be on the lighter side of the spectrum. I have a 5" trail bike that has some XC leanings but can still handle some light AM / v. light FR type stuff. With my basic kit on it (for fun and long rides), it sits pretty much at 30lbs. With my "all weather, all terrain, all reason" kit on it, the weight goes up 2-3lbs as lights, batteries, fenders, different tires and so forth get added. Some folks I know have serious XC leanings and have 4" FS bikes that run 25-27lbs...but then again, they have spent a fair bit of coin to get the bike to that weight.
 

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One other thing.....yes, a lightweight bike is great, but if you are carrying and extra 10-20 pounds on your other frame (beer belly for example!) it is silly to pay a lot extra for a lighter weight frame.
 
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