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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am working on replacing all of the parts that were stolen along with my MTB. It's shocking how many things you don't realize were taken until you try to get everything replaced. So, I am looking for a few things and would like to hear your recommendations.

Here's what I am looking for along with an approx budget:

1. Cycle computer (wireless preferred) $50
2. Multi function bike tool $30
3. Mini bike pump $30
4. Seat bag $25 (should I bother, I have a backpack already)
5. Tube repair kit $20
6. Anything else I might need?

If it makes any difference for anything, my bike is a Cannondale RZ 140 3Z

Cheers
 

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I don't know what a tube repair kit is, but I just carry a spare tube.

There's a list somewhere on the forum of what to bring on a ride. It's much more complete than what I could list here.
 

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Have you thought about using a CO2 inflator? They cost much less than pumps and if you don't get a lot of flats they are actually a very good choice. +1 on the spare tube instead of a patch kit, although it's smart to keep a patch kit with you anyways. Just throw the spare tube in for a quick change and repair the popped tube at home. Forget the seatpack if you have a backpack that you are already bringing. And for a wireless computer I really like the ones that Specialized makes. They are very easy to use and have a huge display screen. Specialized also makes some good multitools. Not sure what the computers run these days but here's a breakdown of what you may spend:

Tube:$5
Patch Kit:$3
CO2 with an extra cartridge (2 total, 1 should be included with the inflator):$20
Computer: ~$60
Multitool: ~$25
 

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I would recommend having both the spare tube and the patch kit, because just having a spare tube won't help if you get a second flat. It's definitely faster to use the spare when you get the first flat though

Also recommended:
SRAM PowerLink to quickly repair a broken chain
spare chainring bolt
spare cleat bolt if you use clipless pedals
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
OK, so I took a look at CO2 inflators and one review mentioned that you have to let out the CO2 when you get home. Why? Also, there is an ongoing cost of the cartridges compared to a pump.
 

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Not sure what you mean by letting the CO2 out when you get home. But that's what I mentioned in the previous post when I said they cost less than pumps if you don't get many flats. The trails I ride on don't have many flat causing things, if fact, the only flat I got mountain biking last year was riding at home when I found a rusty chunk of metal on my personal trails. So for me, the CO2 was just easier and less expensive. I still have a floor pump, but the CO2 goes with me everywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My understanding from the review comment on Amazon was this:
If you have a flat, repair the flat then use the CO2 inflator to pump it back up. Then finish your ride and head home. When you get home, let the CO2 out of the tube and re-inflate it with a regular air pump.

This seems odd to me, CO2 is an inert gas and should not compromise the tube material in any way, but the commenter seemed to think otherwise.

Please feel free to correct him!!

Here's the review page: http://goo.gl/g54Nz
And here is the direct quote "Of course, you have to let that C02 out of the tire, once you get home."
 

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That is very odd. I've worked in a shop during summers for 4 years now and everyone there loves CO2 and has never let it out after a ride. I'm still running a tube on my fixed gear road bike that was filled with CO2 last summer (of course I still top it off with the floor pump though) and it's holding up just fine.
 

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BritOnTour said:
OK, so I took a look at CO2 inflators and one review mentioned that you have to let out the CO2 when you get home. Why? Also, there is an ongoing cost of the cartridges compared to a pump.
Get an inflator that can use standard 12g CO2 cartridges like you use for BB guns. Now go to walmart and buy a box of 15 cartridges for $5.

I have this one and it's compatible with the standard 12g non-threaded cartridges or 12, 16, 25 gram threaded cartridges. Really versatile unit.
 

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sasquatch rides a SS said:
That is very odd.
The reason is that CO2 leaks out of the tube faster than air. It's more noticeable on a high pressure road bike tires.

For example, with standard air, you may lose 1-5psi a week, whereas with CO2, you might lose 5-15psi in the same time period.

Hence, many choose to completely replace the CO2 with air when possible.
 

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Bryank930 said:
Get an inflator that can use standard 12g CO2 cartridges like you use for BB guns. Now go to walmart and buy a box of 15 cartridges for $5.
That's a great idea actually. I've always used threaded and never really could explain why haha
 

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BritOnTour said:
This seems odd to me, CO2 is an inert gas and should not compromise the tube material in any way, but the commenter seemed to think otherwise.
Technically, Carbon dioxide is not an inert gas. Inert gasses included any of the noble gases: helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon, and radon.

CO2 may be considered "inert" because it's mostly nonreactive, just like the noble gases. In a bike tube, however, CO2 is more soluble within the butyl or latex so it permeates the membrane faster, resulting in a decrease in pressure. This is counter intuitive, given the molecular weight of CO2 is much greater than that of normal air molecules (N2 and O2).

CO2 is a great temporary fix for racers or people who don't like to ride with bulk. For me, on average trail rides, they will never replace my hand pump (Lezyne Alloy Drive).
 

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BritOnTour said:
I am working on replacing all of the parts that were stolen along with my MTB. It's shocking how many things you don't realize were taken until you try to get everything replaced. So, I am looking for a few things and would like to hear your recommendations.

Here's what I am looking for along with an approx budget:

1. Cycle computer (wireless preferred) $50
2. Multi function bike tool $30
3. Mini bike pump $30
4. Seat bag $25 (should I bother, I have a backpack already)
5. Tube repair kit $20
6. Anything else I might need?

If it makes any difference for anything, my bike is a Cannondale RZ 140 3Z

Cheers
Here are my suggestions:

1. Cycle computer - Planet Bike Protege 9.0 Wireless ($40)
2. Multi function bike tool - Crank Brothers Multi-17 ($24)
3. Mini bike pump - Lezyne Alloy Drive ($35)
4. Seat bag - none
5. Tube repair kit - Any ($2, not $20)
6. Anything else I might need? - Extra quick links (SRAM PowerLink), an extra tube (much faster than using a repair kit)

I own the above products, so let me know if you have questions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I bought a couple of things off my list:

1. Bike Computer - Thinking of getting a GPS instead. Maybe Garmin Oregon 200
2. Bought Topeak Alien II 26-Function Bicycle Tool
3. Bought Topeak Turbo Morph Bike Pump with Gauge
4. Seat Bag - Going to stick with my Hydropak for now. plenty of space.
5. Tube repair kit - not sure why i thought they would cost $20. Bought some stick on patches for emergency repair.
6. Extras - KMC missing links, spare chain, spare tube.
 

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PG256 said:
Check out Lezyne for a Multi tool and pump.
Check the post right before yours. The OP already bought a multi-tool and pump.

Protip: Read either the whole thread or the last few posts to make sure you're not replying to a topic that's dead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The thread's not dead yet!! However, PG256 did suggest items I had already purchased.

I keep changing my mind on the cycle computer/GPS. Now thinking the Oregon 450 is the one to get. I think I blew my budget of $50 to pieces!!
 

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If you plan on using the maps feature, then the 450 is good to have (big touchscreen, good maps.) If you aren't too interested in really using the mapping feature, and all you want is GPS tracking for your rides, look into the Edge 500.

I have the Edge 705 and it's useful for me when doing other activities (like hiking trips.)
 
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