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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there
I'm a fatso... but I used to LOVE riding bikes when I was young. It was how I kept weight off.
I want to buy a new bike and start up again.
I need a bike that can handle my weight. Last time I tried riding a bike, the tires sorta... flattened (I was 315 at that point I think)

I am currently 6'3" and 290lbs

I plan to ride some trails and drop some weight.

I need something burly.
I want it to be good on road and on light trails
 

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Your bike is incorrigible
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Chapel said:
Hi there
I'm a fatso... but I used to LOVE riding bikes when I was young. It was how I kept weight off.
I want to buy a new bike and start up again.
I need a bike that can handle my weight. Last time I tried riding a bike, the tires sorta... flattened (I was 315 at that point I think)

I am currently 6'3" and 290lbs

I plan to ride some trails and drop some weight.

I need something burly.
I want it to be good on road and on light trails
First of all, this forum is not for fatsoes; it is for those of us who happen to be big boned.

Now, the real question is, How much are you going to spend? You can always go with the Kona Hoss, as it was designed to be a XC bike for clydes. Or, if you want to spend more money, there are some good full suspension bikes out there that will stand up to clyde abuse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
heh. I'm actually just calling myself a fatso (I should have titled this "Bike suggestions for A fatso"). But even at my lightest, I find it hard to get below 220lbs. I'm a BIG guy overall. 38" waist is the smallest I've ever worn past age 14.
I'm actually looking for something on the 'less expensive' side.
Someone else mentioned a Kona Hoss to me
I've been told to look for a primarily rigid frame and fork and big fat tires and tubes.
I don't think I need a suspended bike as the trails I'll probably ride are pretty soft.
I'm might want to consider a full suspender later when I've dropped the weight and want to hit the more abusive trails.
 

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Chapel said:
heh. I'm actually just calling myself a fatso (I should have titled this "Bike suggestions for A fatso"). But even at my lightest, I find it hard to get below 220lbs. I'm a BIG guy overall. 38" inseams are the smallest I've ever worn past age 14.
I'm actually looking for something on the 'less expensive' side.
Someone else mentioned a Kona Hoss to me
I've been told to look for a primarily rigid frame and fork and big fat tires and tubes.
I don't think I need a suspended bike as the trails I'll probably ride are pretty soft.
I'm might want to consider a full suspender later when I've dropped the weight and want to hit the more abusive trails.
I was just kidding about the fatso bit.

The Hoss is really overbuilt, and it can take a lot of abuse. There are some who think it is good for dirt jumping it is so burly, but it is meant as a XC bike. The basic Hoss goes for $800, and the Hoss Dee-lux goes for $1100. Some have mentioned that the forks on the basic are not so great. I wouldn't know because I built mine up from the frame.

You could go cheaper and look at the Specialized Rockhopper. You can get one with decent forks and brakes for around $600.

A lot is going to depend on what your local stores carry. My advice for now is to check out the local shops and see what brands they carry. Also see how large the frames run (it won't do you any good if the largest frame is 19" since you're going to need upwards of 22" with that inseam). Then we can decide on which bike from which brand is best for you.
 

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Klydesdale
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Guyechka said:
I was just kidding about the fatso bit.

The Hoss is really overbuilt, and it can take a lot of abuse. There are some who think it is good for dirt jumping it is so burly, but it is meant as a XC bike. The basic Hoss goes for $800, and the Hoss Dee-lux goes for $1100. Some have mentioned that the forks on the basic are not so great. I wouldn't know because I built mine up from the frame.
Personally, I don't think that a MTB that uses a Shimano FH-M475 rear hub is "really overbuilt"or "burly". The frame may be pretty beefy but if you keep cracking freewheel bodies and bending axles like I've done with every level of Shimano freehub I've tried, you're going to want a to upgrade to a stronger hub pretty soon. (And I'm "only" 250 and don't do any sort of real dirt jumping.)
 

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Chapel said:
I guess the big question is... how much money is it gonna cost me to get a basic 'big fella bike'
Hard tail = from $700. At least, this is what I figure you are looking at in the first place, hard tails. And there are several, but, again, it all depends on what your shop carries. I would not recommend ordering one through the mail. I mean, there are clyde worthy selections from Marin, GT, Specialized, Kona--and those are just the bigger brand names.
 

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My suggestion would be to see if you can rent a bike and try a couple of ride first, and then go from there. A friend of mine just bought a bike and less than a mounth later decided that the trails weren't for him. Don't make the mistake that I made 4 mounths ago. And that was getting back into biking for as little as possible. I spent 300.00 on a mtb with entry level equip. wasn't one week before I stripped my first set of cranks. Upgraded them and three weeks later stripped them out. I am 285 lbs. Ended up trading in the bike lossing a 1/4 of my money and getting some thing that could handle me. You are better waiting and saving your money for some thing decent.
 

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Making fat cool since '71
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Lots of "depends"...

As you can imagine there are lots of threads on this and if you want more info than you can shake a pound of bacon at just search: Bikes for Clydes, Best+Bike+Clydesdale, etc...

That being said, if money is the most predominant factor in your decision the "best" option is the Hoss. The SC Chameleon is a good choice for us, but about 30% more $ (give or take sales). My biggest bit of advice (being a clyde, being an aggressive trail rider, having absolutely zero skill, having once weighed 310+...) is to be faithful to whatever bike you get and do *not* get discouraged when things break, it happens. Despite protestations to the opposite all bits can and do break. Shimano hubs in my experience been one of the worst things a clyde can put on their bikes. It's an area I would drop some coin on. I've rebuilt tons (literally...) of rear hubs (XT) before I decided to just drop some coin on "good" hubs (King). Zero issues since, period. Having a compotent builder lace your wheels makes a shiteload of difference in how those finicky little bastards roll and stay true as well. Factory wheels may have decent bits on them, but machines don't build a wheel like a shop wrench can (in my not so freakin humble opinion...).

Anywho, and back to the question I suppose: give yourself a grand to get a bike, new, or six hundred bucks used and *plan* on things breaking (hubs, seatpost, cranks, rims, pedals). If I could only focus on one part of my bike to put lots of importance on: wheels. They will serve you long and well or cause buckets of heartache just when you don't want it (7 miles into the trail for example?). Other than that, replace things as they come up. *My* 2 1/2 cents on bikes for someone in your position since you asked: Hoss or some hardtail Giant and spend as much money as you can on wheel upgrades. Forks fail eventually and most (not all) OEM forks suck for clydes (fork would be my second upgrade since I like to know my bike will go where I point it...). Thomson seatposts rock, Chris King and Hadley hubs are the best, Race Face cranks? yep (I'm experimenting with Truvativ right now...), stay away from carbon bars for now, Sun rims are flat out the best (rhynolite xl; cheap and reliable!!!!).

Sorry for the length, but I'm stuck in Gold Beach, OR for work and I hate this place...bored. Take care, good luck and if you find yourself in OR wanting to ride send me a message I'm always up for a ride with a fellow clyde! Enjoy the ride my brother in bacon.

Brock...
 

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Brackish
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I'm 6'2" and 240 right now. My all around play bike is the Iron Horse Yakuza Waka-Gashira. It's a big, burly hardtail that has withstood 10 months of abuse so far, including general trail riding (very nimble, particularly with clipless pedals), drops of up to 4' and some skatepark riding. I love it, and Performance usually has deals on them or their lower priced counterparts (Chimpira and something else). I ride the 19" frame, and it's pretty damn heavy but heavy duty as well.
 

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Making fat cool since '71
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Oh yeah...

I forgot all about the Iron Horse hardtails. Must be too many blows to the head in my life...

I even rode an Iron Horse Chimpira (Yakuza line?) to check out for a buddy who was looking to get into the sport and it was ok. I only have urban time on one, but it took some stairs and junk like that just fine. I'm still not a fan of factory wheels, but that bike was a good place to start (he went with a kona though). Like the above cat said performancbike.com seems to have the Iron Horses on sale pretty much all the time.

Brock...

edit: size? depends on inseam and toptube length and torso length. Some "fudging" can be done with stems and seatposts if something is an inch or so out of wack though; sometimes. It sounds like you are sort of in between. My dh bike was smaller (19") and my all around is bigger (21"). More to think about.
 
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