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Ride & Smile
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What bike specific tools would you need to perform basic work including switching out forks, handlebars, wheels, tires, pedals, and basic maintenance?

I have plenty of basic tools including wrenches, screwdrivers, etc. but was curious what bike shop tools people would recommend adding to a home workshop.

Some ideas include a torque wrench and bike stand, but I don’t have a clue what brands to look at and how much to budget. I am guessing avoiding a couple trips to the local bike shop would help pay for some.
 

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I would by a work stand for sure. I have a Park PCS-9 works great. Is portable and $120 at price point right now.

You have some tools but a nice set of metric hex wrenches will be invaluable. I have a Pedros set that even came with a torx 25 that fits rotor bolts. I think it was $40

A chain tool is nice but I used the one on my multi tool for years before I bought a real one.

I like having a separate set of tire levers in the work shop so I don't have to dig through my pack. You will need at least 2 if you don't have any.

Floor pump is key if you don't already own one.

Maybe a nipple wrench for your bike. You can do a pretty decent truing job with the wheel on the bike.

Everything else I would probably just wait until it comes up. That is how I acquired most of my tools. Something would break or I would need to do a particular job I would buy the tools I needed. It depends on the job obviously, but it usually isn't much more than the shop labor charges you would pay for anyway.

I only recently added a torque wrench to my workshop. It depends on what you are working on on how much you need a torque wrench. The more expensive and "carbony" your bike the more you need to be careful and set the correct torque.

When you look at the Park tools web site there are so many tools it's crazy. But you don't need to be able to work on every bike and every different standard that has come along just your bike. You won't need nearly as many tools as Park makes
 

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Ride & Smile
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
ChainChain said:
I would by a work stand for sure. I have a Park PCS-9 works great. Is portable and $120 at price point right now.

You have some tools but a nice set of metric hex wrenches will be invaluable. I have a Pedros set that even came with a torx 25 that fits rotor bolts. I think it was $40
I plan to start with a portable work stand and a set of metric hex wrenches with some type of handle.

I actually have a torque wrench, but it has an end that accepts sockets for my socket wrench set. I think a hex bit set like the following should allow me to use the torque wrench.

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_...b&srccode=cii_18492716&cpncode=22-102102434-2

Is it fairly simple to swap out forks? If I can find a suspension fork on sale I would like to swap out the rigid fork on my SS.
 

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psycho cyclo addict
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A half decent combo tool set like: http://cgi.ebay.com/Super-B-37pc-Home-Mechanic-Bike-Bicycle-Tool-Kit-Set-/160554060828

A 3/8 drive torque wrench capable of ~50 nm or so and possibly a second more precise smaller one (2-8 nm possibly) for carbon components, chainring bolts and other things that require ACCURATE low torque.

A set of T-handle metric hex wrenches.

The things I use most often:
Scale to weigh components (I scored a nice Mettler/Toledo lab scale off eBay)
Derailleur alignment gauge (Park DAG-1)
Wheel dish tool (Park WAG-4 get this one so you can check dish of wheels w/ tire mounted!)
Bass guitar pick to compare spoke tensions
Home Depot chainsaw oil (very cost effective and as good as bike specific stuff)
Grease of some sort (synthetic or not- I have both so I can match what is already present if I am topping it off on something that does not require cleaning).

I do not own a bike stand. I work on it upside down, mounted on my car carrier or attached to a couple ropes hanging in my garage. If I get one, it is going to be the Ultimate Pro http://cgi.ebay.com/Ultimate-FEEDBACK-SPORTS-Pro-Classic-Repair-Stand-NEW-/220537704491
 

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KanzaKrūzer said:
Is it fairly simple to swap out forks? If I can find a suspension fork on sale I would like to swap out the rigid fork on my SS.
its pretty easy. You will need to cut the steering stem of a new fork. Pipe cutter or hacksaw will work. You will need to un install the headset bearing race on your old fork and put it on your new one. install a new star nut in your new fork steering tube and install brakes. That's about it.
 

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Class Clown
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Spoke wrench, cassette lockring tool, hub tools depending on your hubs (ie. cone wrenches).
You can do alot with normal allen wrenches and grease.

There are plenty of specialty tools for wheel truing/building even headset installation, crank/BB tools...I just pick them up as I need them.

A repair stand is a great thing to have although I don't have one atm so it's not a necessity.
 

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Ride & Smile
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I dropped by Home Depot and picked up a hex bit set that I can use with my torque wrench. I also bought a $5 one piece metric set of hex heads.

I went online to look at repair stands and purchased the Feedback Sports Pro-Elite Bicycle Repair Stand without tote bag at Jensen USA for $206.99 including shipping. You just have to shop around and find a valid online offer that Jensen will price match. I had been wanting to try out Jensen since Universal has been getting most of my business.

That should work for my needs.
 

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Ride & Smile
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
KanzaKrūzer said:
I went online to look at repair stands and purchased the Feedback Sports Pro-Elite Bicycle Repair Stand without tote bag at Jensen USA for $206.99 including shipping.
I just received the Feedback Sports Pro-Elite Bicycle Repair Stand and am really impressed with the build quality. Very solid and extremely user friendly!
 

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That’s no moon.
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KanzaKrūzer said:
I just received the Feedback Sports Pro-Elite Bicycle Repair Stand and am really impressed with the build quality. Very solid and extremely user friendly!
Congrats! I saw one of those in REI the other day and it was nice, I like the ratcheting mechanism. I have an older Ultimate stand which works good, maybe not as easy to clamp the bike but I'm happy with it.

As far as everyday tools/supplies, the things I use most when tinkering are allen wrenches, needle nose pliers, zip ties, stubby ratchet, screwdrivers, grease, chain cleaner, chain lube, rags, alcohol, spoke wrench, tire levers, floor pump. Most of my bike specific tools only come out once a year or so.
 

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Here is what I bought...

KanzaKrūzer said:
What bike specific tools would you need to perform basic work including switching out forks, handlebars, wheels, tires, pedals, and basic maintenance?

Some ideas include a torque wrench and bike stand, but I don't have a clue what brands to look at and how much to budget. I am guessing avoiding a couple trips to the local bike shop would help pay for some.
I kind of went all out and bought a bunch of Park tools. Like you, I already have many basic tools, but didn't want to keep running to the shop for odd tools. I got their PRS-21 stand, AK-37 tool set, their big blue book and a few other things described here:

http://www.cuttingthebills.com/2011/01/do-it-yourself-bicycle-maintenance.html

The AK-37 tool set may seem like overkill, but I've actually used most of the tools already (and even loaned some out to a friend).

So far I've completely overhauled 3 bikes and am really happy with the results. Prior to this the most complicated thing I had done was to change tires! I even fixed a really hard to troubleshoot creak in my new Gary Fisher hard tail.

I've even also sprung for the Park truing stand and spoke tension meter (should arrive tomorrow - Yeah!). I figure being able to true my own wheels adds a whole new level of challenge.

Yes, this stuff is not cheap, but given that I've totally rebuilt my bikes, I am more than pleased with the fun I've had and knowledge gained. Eventually I'll probably even recoup my investment (however, that really isn't my goal).

Cheers,

George
 

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It sounds like you've already got the basic stuff you need. As mentioned buy things as you need them. The one thing I didn't see on your list was rags, chain lube and bike cleaner. I use these 3 things the most outside of my bike stand and hex wrenches. I buy bags in huge bundles and throw them away, they are really that cheap.
 

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KanzaKrūzer said:
I just received the Feedback Sports Pro-Elite Bicycle Repair Stand and am really impressed with the build quality. Very solid and extremely user friendly!
I just got mine on Friday and couldn't be happier with it. Very worth the money spent! I also purchased a Feedback Sports tool tray that snaps on to the stand.
 

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brent878 said:
its pretty easy. You will need to cut the steering stem of a new fork. Pipe cutter or hacksaw will work. You will need to un install the headset bearing race on your old fork and put it on your new one. install a new star nut in your new fork steering tube and install brakes. That's about it.
Since you have to get a new star nut would it make sense to replace the headset bearing race at the same time? What tools are needed to uninstall and reinstall the headset bearing race...or do they just slide off? I tried reading this article and it just confused the heck out of me....

http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/threadless-headset-service
 

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Oh no you di'int
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To install a crown race you need an appropriately sized PVC pipe and a mallet to set the race. To remove the race you can use a screwdriver and mallet and tap around the race to keep the race straight so it doesn't bind as you are removing it.
 
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