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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a Specialized Rockhopper and already want to upgrade to full suspension. I'll be riding on streets, dirt trails with undulation, gravel, and maybe every other week a beginner trail in the desert.
I have an XL in the Rockhopper right now ( I'm 6'5, 255 lbs) and I'm not sure if the reach is off or the seat height but I do get a lot of fatigue in my hands pretty quick. Usually about 15-20 minutes into the ride.
Right now I'm looking at the following:

https://www.canyon.com/en-us/mtb/spectral/2019/spectral-al-6-0

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/m...lloy-29-12-speed/p/157617?color=236397-157617

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/mens-stumpjumper-st-comp-alloy-29/p/159205?color=239758-159205


https://us.yt-industries.com/detail/index/sArticle/2122/sCategory/511

I don't know too much about components so I'm hoping you guys could give me a little information about what would be better on each of these or if there's a clear favorite.

Right now I'm leaning toward the two Stumpjumper's because I'd like to stay local, my local shop offers free tune ups for life, but I'd need a good discount on them. Is there a big difference between the two that makes one worth the extra $300?

I like the Canyon after that but it's not a 29er which I'd prefer.

Appreciate the help!
 

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honestly, if you have FIT issues, you need to dump preconceptions about the bike you want, and you need to just ride bikes and figure out what fits, regardless of brand.

But I doubt that you have major fit issues. Maybe a minor setup issue, but based on what you've provided, it's impossible to say what that might be. Maybe a higher rise handlebar. Maybe adjusting saddle height or fore/aft position or angle. Maybe a handlebar with different sweep. Again, impossible to say what at this point. What is almost certain, though, is that you just need to keep riding the bike you've got because you're going to have to build up muscles and calluses. Because it takes time. Particularly, you need to build core strength to be able to support your body. Riding a mtb should involve putting most weight into the pedals and using your core to keep too much pressure off of your hands.

For the riding you're actually doing, the bike you have actually sounds like a respectable choice. I certainly wouldn't bother spending thousands on a mid-travel full suspension if you're only riding the occasional beginner trail. For that matter, when you're spending over $3k on a bike, $300 is like waffling over $50 difference on a couple of $500 bikes. It's piddly when you look at the big picture. The biggest difference between those two bikes is the difference in travel. 130mm for the ST Comp and 150mm for the Comp. That'll change how they ride and how they handle. But either is frankly too much if you're mostly riding pavement with the very occasional beginner trail.

I'd say hold onto your money until you're ready to commit specifically to mtb riding and you're ready to start using a full suspension for what it's best at - rough trails. You can keep the hardtail for pavement and gravel duties and save the FS for the stuff it's best at.

Further, take your time. Make sure that your issues aren't just your body needing to adapt to riding a bike. Because you'll feel the same thing, if not worse, on any of those FS bikes you linked if so. And if your issues are a legitimate setup issue or fit issue, then approach it systematically, which may mean spending time at the shop talking to staff about your issues, and letting them watch you ride to identify things that might help. It may mean specifically seeking someone who knows something about fitting mountain bikes. But throwing thousands of dollars at the problem by trying to pick a bike online based on price is a recipe for disaster.

Before you drop that kind of money, you need to know it's going to work for you. And at this point, you don't have a clue...just that you're not comfortable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
honestly, if you have FIT issues, you need to dump preconceptions about the bike you want, and you need to just ride bikes and figure out what fits, regardless of brand.

But I doubt that you have major fit issues. Maybe a minor setup issue, but based on what you've provided, it's impossible to say what that might be. Maybe a higher rise handlebar. Maybe adjusting saddle height or fore/aft position or angle. Maybe a handlebar with different sweep. Again, impossible to say what at this point. What is almost certain, though, is that you just need to keep riding the bike you've got because you're going to have to build up muscles and calluses. Because it takes time. Particularly, you need to build core strength to be able to support your body. Riding a mtb should involve putting most weight into the pedals and using your core to keep too much pressure off of your hands.

For the riding you're actually doing, the bike you have actually sounds like a respectable choice. I certainly wouldn't bother spending thousands on a mid-travel full suspension if you're only riding the occasional beginner trail. For that matter, when you're spending over $3k on a bike, $300 is like waffling over $50 difference on a couple of $500 bikes. It's piddly when you look at the big picture. The biggest difference between those two bikes is the difference in travel. 130mm for the ST Comp and 150mm for the Comp. That'll change how they ride and how they handle. But either is frankly too much if you're mostly riding pavement with the very occasional beginner trail.

I'd say hold onto your money until you're ready to commit specifically to mtb riding and you're ready to start using a full suspension for what it's best at - rough trails. You can keep the hardtail for pavement and gravel duties and save the FS for the stuff it's best at.

Further, take your time. Make sure that your issues aren't just your body needing to adapt to riding a bike. Because you'll feel the same thing, if not worse, on any of those FS bikes you linked if so. And if your issues are a legitimate setup issue or fit issue, then approach it systematically, which may mean spending time at the shop talking to staff about your issues, and letting them watch you ride to identify things that might help. It may mean specifically seeking someone who knows something about fitting mountain bikes. But throwing thousands of dollars at the problem by trying to pick a bike online based on price is a recipe for disaster.

Before you drop that kind of money, you need to know it's going to work for you. And at this point, you don't have a clue...just that you're not comfortable.
I appreciate your advice and will follow it. I bought the bike about 3 weeks ago and have been riding it almost every day. I figured out the saddle issue and bought an ergon which made a big difference. The biggest thing is that there's a lot of pressure in my hands and it feels like the bar is digging into my palms.

How do you recommend riding other bikes though? Rent them? It's usually hard to find things in my size.
 

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I appreciate your advice and will follow it. I bought the bike about 3 weeks ago and have been riding it almost every day. I figured out the saddle issue and bought an ergon which made a big difference. The biggest thing is that there's a lot of pressure in my hands and it feels like the bar is digging into my palms.

How do you recommend riding other bikes though? Rent them? It's usually hard to find things in my size.
It's demo season. Bike demo trucks are traveling the country right now. Usually you find them here and there one at a time, but occasionally you'll find events where multiple demo trucks show up to the same event. For example, recently there was one in my area where YT, Specialized, Trek, Transition, and a few others were on site. The demo rides got rained out, unfortunately, so it just ended up being a big party (which wasn't so bad) with onsite pavement test rides. You can find out about the events from the brands' social media feeds or their websites (events sections).

Your hand issue is probably just a setup thing. Do you wear gloves? Do the grips offer much "cush" or are they thin/firm? Lots of options for cushier grips, and also a variety of ergonomic shapes.

But part of this may be related to larger fit/setup issues. If you've got long legs and a short torso, you're going to have a big saddle-bars drop. That'll put a lot of weight on your hands. A bike with a very tall "stack" dimension can help bring your hands up without as much need for mega-rise handlebars. You can make your current bike work better by using bars with more rise if this is a reason for the hand pressure, as it should help you balance your weight better.

But all that is hypothetical because I can't see your bike/setup, and you haven't posted pics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's demo season. Bike demo trucks are traveling the country right now. Usually you find them here and there one at a time, but occasionally you'll find events where multiple demo trucks show up to the same event. For example, recently there was one in my area where YT, Specialized, Trek, Transition, and a few others were on site. The demo rides got rained out, unfortunately, so it just ended up being a big party (which wasn't so bad) with onsite pavement test rides. You can find out about the events from the brands' social media feeds or their websites (events sections).

Your hand issue is probably just a setup thing. Do you wear gloves? Do the grips offer much "cush" or are they thin/firm? Lots of options for cushier grips, and also a variety of ergonomic shapes.

But part of this may be related to larger fit/setup issues. If you've got long legs and a short torso, you're going to have a big saddle-bars drop. That'll put a lot of weight on your hands. A bike with a very tall "stack" dimension can help bring your hands up without as much need for mega-rise handlebars. You can make your current bike work better by using bars with more rise if this is a reason for the hand pressure, as it should help you balance your weight better.

But all that is hypothetical because I can't see your bike/setup, and you haven't posted pics.
I did buy bike gloves that have some gel in them to deal with it. I rode a bmx bike A LOT as a kid (haro shredder ?) and never a mtb. This is my first time riding them so there's definitely a lot to learn. I've never really had issues with pain in my hands. Granted we are talking 20 years ago when I was 1,000x more active so that could be it too.

My grips were upgraded to the Ergon GE1 Evo. The stock grips were too aggressive and were tearing up my hands.

What pictures would be best to post and what determines if you have a short torso? I measured my inseam and it's 36".

Finally, I suspect it's more than just a grip issues and a bit more of an overall bike fit issue.
 

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honestly, if you have FIT issues, you need to dump preconceptions about the bike you want, and you need to just ride bikes and figure out what fits, regardless of brand.

But I doubt that you have major fit issues. Maybe a minor setup issue, but based on what you've provided, it's impossible to say what that might be. Maybe a higher rise handlebar. Maybe adjusting saddle height or fore/aft position or angle. Maybe a handlebar with different sweep. Again, impossible to say what at this point. What is almost certain, though, is that you just need to keep riding the bike you've got because you're going to have to build up muscles and calluses. Because it takes time. Particularly, you need to build core strength to be able to support your body. Riding a mtb should involve putting most weight into the pedals and using your core to keep too much pressure off of your hands.

For the riding you're actually doing, the bike you have actually sounds like a respectable choice. I certainly wouldn't bother spending thousands on a mid-travel full suspension if you're only riding the occasional beginner trail. For that matter, when you're spending over $3k on a bike, $300 is like waffling over $50 difference on a couple of $500 bikes. It's piddly when you look at the big picture. The biggest difference between those two bikes is the difference in travel. 130mm for the ST Comp and 150mm for the Comp. That'll change how they ride and how they handle. But either is frankly too much if you're mostly riding pavement with the very occasional beginner trail.

I'd say hold onto your money until you're ready to commit specifically to mtb riding and you're ready to start using a full suspension for what it's best at - rough trails. You can keep the hardtail for pavement and gravel duties and save the FS for the stuff it's best at.

Further, take your time. Make sure that your issues aren't just your body needing to adapt to riding a bike. Because you'll feel the same thing, if not worse, on any of those FS bikes you linked if so. And if your issues are a legitimate setup issue or fit issue, then approach it systematically, which may mean spending time at the shop talking to staff about your issues, and letting them watch you ride to identify things that might help. It may mean specifically seeking someone who knows something about fitting mountain bikes. But throwing thousands of dollars at the problem by trying to pick a bike online based on price is a recipe for disaster.

Before you drop that kind of money, you need to know it's going to work for you. And at this point, you don't have a clue...just that you're not comfortable.
This doesnt help much. IMO.
 

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Hey im 6'6" with a 37" inseam 260lbs. So i feel qualified to answer you.

I started with a xxl specialized fuse. This bike has lots of stack. I switched further to full length steerer tube in my fork and then mounted 38mm riser bars. So now its really got alot of stack. I end up with my seat about parallel to the bars or a touch higher. This was my first mountain bike. I learned alot on it.

Now i went and got an xxl stumpjumper. They were sold in 2018 in aluminum only. I did the same thing w the stack again. But when i first tried it, it had stock bars with a yari fork. This turned my hands numb after about 15minutes. So i put the same bars on as my fuse and it made a huge difference. Deity cz38. Way way better. Then upgraded the internal dampers inside my fork to charger rc2. Now my hands are perfect. Point is bars can be too stiff or wrong curve.

Imo a 2019 stumpjumper xl frame is way too small. I sat on one and it wasnt even close for me. Check the measurements of the xxl stumpy to compare. Also spec and im sure other frame manufacturers change specs from time to time. My stumpy has 40mm less top tube than quoted. As i found out when i got it. So do go sit on and look at the bike. Even take a couple pictures on the bike to see how your posture looks. the 29er frames have higher stack heights to fit the larger wheels (diff frames). So stay with 29ers.

If your not sure about bike fit just know that you are learning and should start with a bike that puts your handelbars about parallel w the seat.

So 650mm stack and higher. Reach should be a min of 480. Stems and seat adjust can help w the rest. Head tube angles should be 67 to 68.5 degrees. Its very hard to find a bike out there like this.

See spec. Fuse, Trek fuel. Kona wozo

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/stumpjumper-comp-alloy-6fattie-29/p/133918?color=240024-133918

https://www.konaworld.com/wozo.cfm

https://www.trekbikes.com/ca/en_CA/...-mountain-bikes/fuel-ex/fuel-ex-8-29/p/23593/

any bike shop that doesnt follow this guidelines above should be avoided.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey im 6'6" with a 37" inseam 260lbs. So i feel qualified to answer you.

I started with a xxl specialized fuse. This bike has lots of stack. I switched further to full length steerer tube in my fork and then mounted 38mm riser bars. So now its really got alot of stack. I end up with my seat about parallel to the bars or a touch higher. This was my first mountain bike. I learned alot on it.

Now i went and got an xxl stumpjumper. They were sold in 2018 in aluminum only. I did the same thing w the stack again. But when i first tried it, it had stock bars with a yari fork. This turned my hands numb after about 15minutes. So i put the same bars on as my fuse and it made a huge difference. Deity cz38. Way way better. Then upgraded the internal dampers inside my fork to charger rc2. Now my hands are perfect. Point is bars can be too stiff or wrong curve.

Imo a 2019 stumpjumper xl frame is way too small. I sat on one and it wasnt even close for me. Check the measurements of the xxl stumpy to compare. Also spec and im sure other frame manufacturers change specs from time to time. My stumpy has 40mm less top tube than quoted. As i found out when i got it. So do go sit on and look at the bike. Even take a couple pictures on the bike to see how your posture looks. the 29er frames have higher stack heights to fit the larger wheels (diff frames). So stay with 29ers.

If your not sure about bike fit just know that you are learning and should start with a bike that puts your handelbars about parallel w the seat.

So 650mm stack and higher. Reach should be a min of 480. Stems and seat adjust can help w the rest. Head tube angles should be 67 to 68.5 degrees. Its very hard to find a bike out there like this.

See spec. Fuse, Trek fuel. Kona wozo

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/stumpjumper-comp-alloy-6fattie-29/p/133918?color=240024-133918

https://www.konaworld.com/wozo.cfm

https://www.trekbikes.com/ca/en_CA/...-mountain-bikes/fuel-ex/fuel-ex-8-29/p/23593/

any bike shop that doesnt follow this guidelines above should be avoided.
Did you ever use any kind of tool to figure out what specs you should look for on a bike based on your own specific measurements? I've used some on direct to consumer websites and they put me on XL bikes because of my inseam.
 

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Pressure on palms:
1. Core strength. Do planks every day. 99% of the aches and pains we get while riding a bike can be mitigated by making our bodies stronger. From personal experience, no amount of throwing money at parts and fitting services can substitute for physical strength in this regard. You have to be able to stabilize your body without straining one part.
2. Bigger grips. Maybe even something like Ergon's shapely grips. You're nearly 6-1/2 feet tall, so I'll assume you have big hands. A few companies make really fat grips in standard round shape.
3. Raise your grips or shorten your reach, or both. Taller riser bars, a stem with a more upward angle, and/or a shorter stem will do this.
 

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I did buy bike gloves that have some gel in them to deal with it. I rode a bmx bike A LOT as a kid (haro shredder ) and never a mtb. This is my first time riding them so there's definitely a lot to learn. I've never really had issues with pain in my hands. Granted we are talking 20 years ago when I was 1,000x more active so that could be it too.

My grips were upgraded to the Ergon GE1 Evo. The stock grips were too aggressive and were tearing up my hands.

What pictures would be best to post and what determines if you have a short torso? I measured my inseam and it's 36".

Finally, I suspect it's more than just a grip issues and a bit more of an overall bike fit issue.
Yeah, a mtb is by definition going to fit differently than a bmx bike. So certainly building your core strength and bike fitness will be a factor. As will just adapting to the bike.

As for pictures, side pics of the bike (just the bike) can be informative. Especially with a side pic of you ON the bike for comparison. Unfortunately no pics will substitute for actually watching you ride it. A vid showing what needs to be seen is going to be harder to record than you think.

As for the long/short torso thing, I got to where I could look at someone (in non bulky clothing) and get an idea of that. A pic of yourself standing against a wall might do it. With a 36 inseam at your height, you prob do have a short torso. A side pic of your bike setup will prob be enough to confirm, assuming seat height is vaguely at a good height for pedaling.

Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Pressure on palms:
1. Core strength. Do planks every day. 99% of the aches and pains we get while riding a bike can be mitigated by making our bodies stronger. From personal experience, no amount of throwing money at parts and fitting services can substitute for physical strength in this regard is. You have to be able to stabilize your body without strairing one part.
2. Bigger grips. Maybe even something like Ergon's shapely grips. You're nearly 6-1/2 feet tall, so I'll assume you have big hands. A few companies make really fat grips in standard round shape.
3. Raise your grips or shorten your reach, or both. Taller riser bars, a stem with a more upward angle, and/or a shorter stem will do this.
Core strength is most likely the biggest culprit so I'll be doing those planks. I can't even ride with no hands.
 

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Did you ever use any kind of tool to figure out what specs you should look for on a bike based on your own specific measurements? I've used some on direct to consumer websites and they put me on XL bikes because of my inseam.
I find that those calculators werent much help for me. Im just on the fringe end. Eg over 250lbs.

What model rockhopper? I see they make an xxl. Also that the xl has a 90mm stem and 69.8 degree head angle. You might find the xxl bike w a 45 to 60mm stem feels better. Did they have an xxl for you to try at the time?

If they have, try a fuse. Its also available in xxl.

I took my time as i knew very little about the sport and technology involved. It paid off as i ended up on a bike that suited my needs very well. A bit lucky as well.

Like yourself i also started just riding around on bike paths w the kids. But as my confidence grew that quickly escalated to longer rides and on more challenging terrain.

You need to be comfortable on the bike so maybe check out a couple other bikes, verify your bike fit, and possibly try a diff handlebar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yeah, a mtb is by definition going to fit differently than a bmx bike. So certainly building your core strength and bike fitness will be a factor. As will just adapting to the bike.

As for pictures, side pics of the bike (just the bike) can be informative. Especially with a side pic of you ON the bike for comparison. Unfortunately no pics will substitute for actually watching you ride it. A vid showing what needs to be seen is going to be harder to record than you think.

As for the long/short torso thing, I got to where I could look at someone (in non bulky clothing) and get an idea of that. A pic of yourself standing against a wall might do it. With a 36 inseam at your height, you prob do have a short torso. A side pic of your bike setup will prob be enough to confirm, assuming seat height is vaguely at a good height for pedaling.

Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
Here you go:


the seat post was moved down about an inch after taking these photos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I find that those calculators werent much help for me. Im just on the fringe end. Eg over 250lbs.

What model rockhopper? I see they make an xxl. Also that the xl has a 90mm stem and 69.8 degree head angle. You might find the xxl bike w a 45 to 60mm stem feels better. Did they have an xxl for you to try at the time?

If they have, try a fuse. Its also available in xxl.

I took my time as i knew very little about the sport and technology involved. It paid off as i ended up on a bike that suited my needs very well. A bit lucky as well.

Like yourself i also started just riding around on bike paths w the kids. But as my confidence grew that quickly escalated to longer rides and on more challenging terrain.

You need to be comfortable on the bike so maybe check out a couple other bikes, verify your bike fit, and possibly try a diff handlebar.
I haven't had the chance to ride any XXL bike yet. I'll see if I can swing by my local bike shop to see if they'll let me test ride one just for science.
 

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You moved the seat DOWN after these pics? See, I think it could go up. Your left knee is probably bent more than it should be in the riding pic.

Also, I think the bars could be rotated towards you. That amount of upsweep would hurt my hands for sure.

You look a little slouchy in the ride pic, too. Not sure how things will look when the seat height is higher and the bars rotated. Try those things, then take more pics.

Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
You moved the seat DOWN after these pics? See, I think it could go up. Your left knee is probably bent more than it should be in the riding pic.

Also, I think the bars could be rotated towards you. That amount of upsweep would hurt my hands for sure.

You look a little slouchy in the ride pic, too. Not sure how things will look when the seat height is higher and the bars rotated. Try those things, then take more pics.

Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
Alright I'll try those two things tomorrow. I could also be slouchy because I'm flabby and out of shape these days.
 

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Alright I'll try those two things tomorrow. I could also be slouchy because I'm flabby and out of shape these days.
Thanks for posting the pictures.

Hardtails on the street use a slightly higher seat position vs on the trail. Reason... you brace a little bit to raise your butt off the seat just slightly for certain obstacles during pedaling. So that needs a little bit lower seat.

To set seat height, sit and have someone hold the bike. Slowly rotate the pedals backwards with your heels on the pedals. You should be able to fully extend the knee. Then on the trail you might drop half an inch.

in the image. Your opposite knee doesnt look close to fully extended. You may not have enough seat tube to get the height you need. Another indication the bike is too small.

For playing around with the kids, this bike will do.... but its too short and your hands are too close to your knees. Raising the seat a little will help, but you will notice when you try a larger bike.

bars... definitely look rolled up and at a weird angle. Put both feet on the ground. Loosen them, Approximate your pedalling position for your arms and upper body and rotate them till they feel most comfortable, then lock them down. Riser bars with a bend that fits you best will help. Look up the diety cz38 model i spoke of. But try holding some in the store to feel how different they feel from one to another.

Dont forget to have fun.
 

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Hardtails on the street use a slightly higher seat position vs on the trail. Reason... you brace a little bit to raise your butt off the seat just slightly for certain obstacles during pedaling. So that needs a little bit lower seat.

To set seat height, sit and have someone hold the bike. Slowly rotate the pedals backwards with your heels on the pedals. You should be able to fully extend the knee. Then on the trail you might drop half an inch.

in the image. Your opposite knee doesnt look close to fully extended. You may not have enough seat tube to get the height you need. Another indication the bike is too small.
Eh, seat position for "road" riding vs "trail" riding isn't going to be enormously different. It's really a pretty subtle difference. You don't have much wiggle room because too far and your knees will start to hurt. The way you phrase it makes it sound like a big difference. It isn't.

As for determining the seat height - that might be a start, but shoe thickness will affect things. Do this with the shoes you're going to ride in. If the pedals on that bike are the stock plastic platforms, OP should get some more durable ones ASAP before messing too much (because pedal thickness will affect saddle height, too). Setting the saddle height is largely about getting decent leg extension and knee comfort while pedaling.

It's not a reliable gauge of whether a bike fits or not. I've noticed over the years that a LOT of tall guys have odd body proportions (especially the short torso/long leg combination) and ride a frame size shorter than you might expect for their height. I worked in a shop with two tall guys who were exactly like this. Because of their long legs, they had to have their saddles high. But because of their short torsos, they had to ride a smaller frame size to keep reach reasonable.

I hesitate to say OP's bike is too small because in raising the saddle, it will stretch him out because the saddle will also be moving backwards. And yeah, it's possible that OP might need a longer seatpost. I'd say before buying a any parts, though, it'd be worth trying a XXL frame. If I was selling OP a bike, I'd definitely want to see him on an XXL at his height. If anything, it would be informative to see which size he was closest to.

If, in fact, OP is on the wrong frame size, we've got a legitimate reason to buy a new bike and I'd emphasize that what is most important is a bike that fits, not what looks good on a spec sheet.
 

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I also wouldn't spend more money on this bike before getting into a quality bike shop and trying out a few different xxl frames. That might mean a few different bike stores as there are only a few bikes made in xxl size and each shop carries only a few brands and fewer yet may actually have one in stock.

The bike you have is an entry level bike that sadly comes in xxl size which you could have tried. Its very common to adjust handlebar stem length to make a short bike a bit bigger and a long bike a bit smaller. Most manufacturers are specifying 50-60mm stem lengths. Then you can size down to 35mm or up to 75mm. Its uncommon to see 90mm stems factory on modern geometry bikes. IMO.

To get on a bike that comes with a stem that long and already be too big for the frame is legitimate reason to size up to an xxl.

Unfortunately alot of stores dont want to carry these bikes as they can be harder to sell. So they often end up discounted at the end of the year. IMO, for cash flow reasons, they would rather just not bother to stock them. This leaves sales people with a desire to sell what they have. Size availability is just one of the negatives us tall people face.

To the OP. Biking is alot of fun and a great and rewarding activity to do with the family or with a friend. Way to go for having the courage to post on here and share your experience and look for help and answers.

Im an inch taller and have an inch more inseam, so i can pretty much assume we have similar torso's. You may likely have a little more arm reach than I which is good as it will let you accommodate a bike with a lower stack height a bit better.

Once you find a bike frame that fits, plan on changing a couple things. Most shops will give you a deal on accessories. Mine gave 10% of the bike cost towards accessories credit at purchase. So on went taller bars with a bend that fit my hands in a more relaxed position. The bars also had a little more flex (didnt feel like a steel beam stiff) so that made riding more comfortable. I also upgraded pedals to ones with steel pins to grip my shoes and that offered the size support for my 14 shoe.

Attached is a pic of my hardtail xxl Fuse. I frequently have people comment "wow is that a big bike".



Stick with it and you may find a new passion that provides more health and wellness benefits than you originally thought possible.
 

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