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emteebee
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mountain biking has brought a lot to me, and has really given me something that is truly my own.

I come from racing sprint cars, and having lots of sponsors, but that is what ruined it, the sponsors. I have always had racing in my blood, but when it comes to mountain biking, I feel NO urge what so ever to race.

I love just going out and xc riding on singletrack. Whether it's bombing down switchbacks, working rough rocky or technical terrain, or even granny gearing it up climbs, I feel so in tune with myself when I am mountain biking.

My question is, lately I have rode a lot of light bikes and nicer bikes that are more xc style, and am just questioning my bike.

I feel limited on climbs, and feel like my bike is more urban. Is my bike holding me back because it is not fulfilling my needs as an xc bike? Please be honest. Now I know any bike can do anything, but I hope you get what I mean. :confused:

It is a 2006 specialized hardrock pro disc.
 

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I wouldn't necessarily say that it's holding you back. It's a pretty good entry level bike. You could get a lighter bike and would be able to climb faster, but you also might run into issues with durability. I say enjoy riding what you have now and in the future upgrade to a full suspension mtb when you find something you like that suits your riding style. The most important thing is to have fun.
 

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new bikes are the best, but upgrading is fun

you need a brand new S-works Epic Carbon is what it sounds like to me. :D j/k. I have felt similar, although I feel like my bike has potential to become relatively lightweight. I have started investing in more lightweight upgrades and that has been alot of fun. Mine is a Stumpjumper. I do a bit of XC racing, but I'm not a contender or anything.
 

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Gravity Rides Everything
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1,126 Posts
cmktech said:
Mountain biking has brought a lot to me, and has really given me something that is truly my own.

I come from racing sprint cars, and having lots of sponsors, but that is what ruined it, the sponsors. I have always had racing in my blood, but when it comes to mountain biking, I feel NO urge what so ever to race.

I love just going out and xc riding on singletrack. Whether it's bombing down switchbacks, working rough rocky or technical terrain, or even granny gearing it up climbs, I feel so in tune with myself when I am mountain biking.

My question is, lately I have rode a lot of light bikes and nicer bikes that are more xc style, and am just questioning my bike.

I feel limited on climbs, and feel like my bike is more urban. Is my bike holding me back because it is not fulfilling my needs as an xc bike? Please be honest. Now I know any bike can do anything, but I hope you get what I mean. :confused:

It is a 2006 specialized hardrock pro disc.
bikes can hold you back. if you feel like a new bike will make you want to ride more/improve your experience: do it!

a lot of cyclists i guess are pretty frugal. i mean it is in many ways a minimalist sort of sport, you bike, bike, trail. but at the same time, the right equipment makes it a lot more fun.

if you can afford it, and you feel it's worth it, buy a new bike. it's only money.
 

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Yes & No

Sure some light fancy bikes can make it easier for you to do some areas of mtb, but the bike is not necessarily going to make you a better rider.

Fancy light bikes are nice of course, but the best way to get stronger and confident on the bike is to ride your entry level for a while. It's heavier yes, but it WILL make you stronger because of it.
You will learn skills that you might get too slack on if you have 5 inches of travel and the bike does all the work for you. You have to really pick your lines...less room for error.

If you can ride an entry level bike, you will find you can hop on just about any bike and make it shine. If you start on a super light fancy bike (even if you can afford it), your skills will never develop the same way as someone who starts on something entry level.
Ask anyone who got into this sport if they feel that their first POS bike taught them bike handling skills and they'll agree wholeheartedly.

If you really want to make the existing bike lighter, make it a single speed. It won't cost much, and will guarantee to make you stronger and the bike may even lose a few POUNDS.

Good Luck.
 

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Fo' Bidniz in da haus
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a nicer bike may not make you a better rider but it may very well make you ride like a better rider given that it may handicap things for you (eg, lighter weight making it better climber, better climbing geometry making it climb better, better descending geometry making you descend better, stiffer laterally allowing you to hold a line through the rough better, etc.)
 

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I recently upgraded from a very entry level fs bike to a used bullit, and I gotta say after two months of riding it I am easily twice the rider I was before.

There are several factors here.

1. Wanting to justify a large purchase really gets you out on the bike. The more you ride the better you get.

2. the urge to "see what this baby can do" causes you to push your limits in all directions whether climbing you a$$ off on that lightweight climbing machine or seeing how big of hit those extra inches of travel can handle. This phase leads to factor 3

3. Confidence. As good as you can ride on entry level, a good bike should (if its the right bike for you) have higher levels of comfort, durability, agility, etc, all these add up to higher limits to what you can accomplish. When you do that thing that used to kicked your ass or sketch you out on the old bike and find it easier or less scary your psychological boundaries expand and you hit it harder, faster, and ultimately funner next time.

I suggest looking for a high end used frame for a good price and throw all your salvageable parts on it. You can upgrade parts as your bike and riding style tell you what it needs. Building a bike yourself really gives you a better understanding of what you bike is made of and why it does the things it does. This knowledge helps you speak your bikes language on the trail.
 
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