Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
ride
Joined
·
5,275 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I used to post on Passion pretty regularly but work, home, and riding have limited my time. Anyway, I live in a fairly conservative (ie old school Rancher conservative) area of Boulder County, CO, in a town of about 1500 people. I started a monthly column in our local paper called Bike Junkie to help spread the love of cycling, and hopefully gain a little tolerance from the good old boys. Sometimes it's about where to ride and sometimes it's been about the joy of riding a bike. I just finished up my latest column for print this week. It reminded me of an old timey passion post and thoughts some of you may enjoy. Here it is:
***********************************************************************************************
Bike Junkie, installment 5

It has happened to all of us, especially those of us that travel to on a regular basis. Imagine humming along down the highway, cruising at a comfortable speed, with no cars either in front or behind. Despite the fact that you're in a car, it's a relatively peaceful setting. Then, out of the blue, a car pulls out on to the highway right in front of you and proceeds to drive a solid ten miles an hour under the posted speed limit. You hit the brakes and follow at the slower speed waiting patiently to pass. No problem you think, as you're nearing a passing zone. You pass the offending car and get back into cruising speed, when what do you spot in your rear view mirror? That same car you just passed that was creeping along is now tailgating you at your speed!

I had one of those experiences on the trail the other day, but it worked out in a way better than I had hoped. On the highway, I can't realistically speed it up to shake a tailgater, because A) I don't want to run into Mr. Police Officer, and B) my 230,000 mile car just doesn't have that kind of oomph anymore. On the bike is different, though…

I was riding along by myself and spied a group of 4 riders taking a break on the side of the trail ahead of me. I neither sped up nor slowed on my approach. As I neared, they all pulled onto the trail immediately in front of me. I slowed down to their speed and rode patiently behind. As soon as the trail allowed room to pass, I politely said "Hello," passed them each one by one and continued on at my own pace. Well, 3 of the 4 continued at their pace, but one in the crew stepped it up, and was now tailgating me. I turned around and said something like "Beautiful day, eh?" but got no response. I shrugged it off and continued on. We were climbing on the trail by now and I could hear his labored breathing behind me. It must have triggered some kind of mental switch that had been flipped off for a while.
<O:p
Now that our oldest daughter has reached 3 years old, I've come to the realization that my past racing career is exactly that - passed. I don't attend races, and I don't race in casual settings on the road or trail. I've been there, done that, and I'm happy with the way it went - no need to relive my glory days racing. But this day was different. All I wanted was a little solitude and I knew I could not win with the tailgater. If I let him pass, he'd slow down again and I'd be stuck riding behind him. If I picked up the pace, it would look like I wanted to race, and I could face a potential ego showdown. Knowing that I could potentially explode, I picked it up and left my tailgater behind. That's when something strange happened, something I had not experienced in a long time.
<O:p
I started feeling really, really good. I recognized it immediately as the calming effect of the endorphin and adrenalin rush that many in the running community refer to as "the runner's high." I felt that I could ride several gears higher than normal (which I proceeded to do). I continued up the long and steady climb feeling fantastic. I started to daydream about racing and I realized, not only have I not raced in 3 years, I also haven't really trained in 3 years. About the time I started thinking about that was the also about the time I crested the top of the climb and the rush began to fade. I recognized that feeling immediately, too! Contrary to my racing days, though, it was neither frustrating nor fleeting. I enjoyed my ride on high and let it slip away peacefully. I don't know where it went, but I know that it will happen again someday. I continued down the singletrack, swooping through the trees with an undeniable smile on my face. I started the ride with a tailgater, but I was still able to find my solitude and then some. Having had my alone time, I turned towards home. I rolled into the driveway dirty and tired, but was then picked up by a new high, one that I've only been lucky enough to experience in the last few years. Greeting me at the door was my 3 year old. I received a hug, a "Hi Daddy," and a feeling to which no endorphin buzz can compare.
 

·
amar la vida de dos niner
Joined
·
2,682 Posts
ignazjr said:
I started the ride with a tailgater, but I was still able to find my solitude and then some. Having had my alone time, I turned towards home. I rolled into the driveway dirty and tired, but was then picked up by a new high, one that I've only been lucky enough to experience in the last few years. Greeting me at the door was my 3 year old. I received a hug, a "Hi Daddy," and a feeling to which no endorphin buzz can compare.[/SIZE][/FONT]
YES! You *can* have it all!!
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top