Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know I screwed up by buying the wrong frame size bike but it is such a mint bike. It is very close to fitting my 6'3" body. The bike is a Specialized FSR 2003 Large. To get a comfortable leg extension on the downstroke I need to jack the seat a bit too far up. My question is can I get to a comfortable place with say an increased angle rise on the stem and a higher rise bar? Or will the geometery be all goofed up? Do I need to go shorter on the stem or longer when I increase the rise of the stem? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Sid
 

·
Domestic Fowl
Joined
·
869 Posts
You need to explain a couple of things:

What do you mean when you have to jack the seat up too far? What do you mean by "too far"? If you're not making the minimum insertion depth on your seat post, then you need to buy a longer seat post(or get your dealer to swap it for a longer one). Otherwise you risk breaking off the seat post and possible damage to the seat tube.

What size frame do you think you should have gotten? If the frame is flat-out the wrong size for you, there really isn't anything you can do to change that. Never, never, never buy a bike that is the wrong size for you, no matter how cheap it is. That said, some people are on the size boundry and could go either way on a frame size. They can go with a larger frame and shorter stem and seatpost, or go with the smaller frame and longer stem and seatpost. It is quite possible you are in the latter catagory.

To answer your question about stems, a 120mm stem with a 5 degree rise will create a longer cockpit than a 120mm stem with a 15 degree rise. To increase the stem angle and maintain the same cockpit length you will need a slightly longer stem.


Just as a frame of reference, for a cross country bike you probably want the handlebars about 1" below the seat. This is just a general guideline. People that ride more technically aggressive terrain generally like the bars a little higher. If you need to go with a steeper stem and a riser bar to get there that's fine. Also, if your current setup has spacers above the stem you can move those spacers underneath the stem and get some height also.

FRC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Free chicken advice

FreeRangeChicken said:
You need to explain a couple of things:

What do you mean when you have to jack the seat up too far? What do you mean by "too far"? If you're not making the minimum insertion depth on your seat post, then you need to buy a longer seat post(or get your dealer to swap it for a longer one). Otherwise you risk breaking off the seat post and possible damage to the seat tube.

What size frame do you think you should have gotten? If the frame is flat-out the wrong size for you, there really isn't anything you can do to change that. Never, never, never buy a bike that is the wrong size for you, no matter how cheap it is. That said, some people are on the size boundry and could go either way on a frame size. They can go with a larger frame and shorter stem and seatpost, or go with the smaller frame and longer stem and seatpost. It is quite possible you are in the latter catagory.

To answer your question about stems, a 120mm stem with a 5 degree rise will create a longer cockpit than a 120mm stem with a 15 degree rise. To increase the stem angle and maintain the same cockpit length you will need a slightly longer stem.

Just as a frame of reference, for a cross country bike you probably want the handlebars about 1" below the seat. This is just a general guideline. People that ride more technically aggressive terrain generally like the bars a little higher. If you need to go with a steeper stem and a riser bar to get there that's fine. Also, if your current setup has spacers above the stem you can move those spacers underneath the stem and get some height also.

FRC
Thank you very much for replying so quickly. While home at lunch a few minutes ago I was looking at the bike and doing some shock measurements. Anyway, I am 6'3" 36" inseam and like to extend my legs just about all the way when I pedal. I do definitely need to get the 300mm long seat tube. But as it is now, I am hunched too far over I think, or I KNOW for a 2 hour ride. I'm thinking maybe an XL would have been the proper choice. Anyway, water under the bridge. I too am hoping I am in the ladder of your two categories, making a shorter and larger rise stem for for me. Funny you mentioned the spacers on my steer tube. While at home I was wondering what those black aluminum spacers were. Although they were under the stem and top of the headset. Three of them, 2 seemed different thicknesses. Nice idea though. Is 15 degree about the largest rise you have seen readily available in someones stock? I am looking at replacing the Manitou AXEL with something that works.
 

·
Domestic Fowl
Joined
·
869 Posts
For good fit your legs should be slightly bent at the bottom of the pedal stroke. You need to ensure that your seat front-to-back position is correct too. If you do some googling on "bike fit" you should find some information on this. You'll need a helper. There is a method where you use a plumb line from your knee down to your pedal to determine correct seat position. Once your seat is in the correct position, then you can worry about the handlebars.

Like I said before, a general rule of thumb for bar height is about 1" below the seat. Grab a level and measure yours. If you're close to this there is probably some other fit issue going on.

Most stems fall between 5-15 degrees. You may be able to dig up something with more rise, but I don't know of anything off-hand. If you do end up putting a different fork on the bike you can have them leave the steering tube a bit longer and put more spacers under the stem to gain some height also.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top